Author Topic: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)  (Read 123018 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline jeavverhey

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1,057
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #450 on: January 08, 2016, 01:49:46 AM »
Thank you Gze and Hubster! :heart What a duo! Keep up the great work you do. :thumbup:

Offline gzebear

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 591
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #451 on: January 08, 2016, 01:33:22 PM »

Bald Eagle "Union" finished her first round of chelation therapy, and they drew blood again today. Her blood lead level is still beyond the upper limit of our screening instrument. We also got back the report from the diagnostic lab giving the level of lead in her blood when she was first admitted, which was quite far into the toxic range. She's alert and has a good appetite so it seems she will most likely survive, but there's a possibility that she may have permanent cardiac or neurologic deficits. That said, there are tremendous individual differences among eagles in lead tolerance, so I am still hopeful that she will make a complete recovery and return to her mate. Apparently he was there the day of her rescue, watching her, according to local residents.

They started a second round of chelation today, so we'll see how that goes. Thanks for all your prayers and good thoughts. 


Offline gzebear

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 591
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #452 on: January 16, 2016, 02:53:53 AM »
BAEA 16-1 Union
"Union" finished her second round of chelation therapy, which brought her lead level down to just within the range of our screening instrument. It's still very high, so she's on a third round and will probably need a fourth. She's still alert, active, and eating well, not showing the usual symptoms of a lead-poisoned eagle. When I was there on Sunday, we moved her to an outdoor habitat in the Eagle Recovery compound, where she has more room to move and the company of other eagles in an adjacent cage.


              
               "Union" - in Bart's Place                                  photo by Glori Berry, Avian Haven



Offline linused

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 398
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #453 on: January 16, 2016, 12:59:11 PM »
Really good news Gze,  thank you for the update. She looks magnificent

Offline gzebear

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 591
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #454 on: January 25, 2016, 06:55:47 AM »

BAEA Bar Harbor, Maine - lead poisoning

We recently admitted another Bald Eagle with lead poisoning. This adult female was seen hitting and getting briefly entangled with a power line. It was a power line in her territory that no doubt she'd flown by hundreds of times. This time she hit it, likely due to the lead level we found which could have impaired her coordination. She suffered a large laceration in one wing, but the greater damage is to her foot. It appears that she may have received an electrical burn in that foot, as it is a different color and temperature than the other foot. We are still watching it, doing what we can to increase circulation and make her comfortable, while also chelating for the lead exposure. 

She is the fifth eagle with lead poisoning admitted to Avian Haven in the past three months.

               


I posted her photo on Facebook yesterday, and the usual conversation about lead ensued: where are they getting it? from the water? from the fish? what can we do? why don't people care? etc., as I patiently answer the same questions with basically the same answers. The good news is that other people also answered some of the questions! which is a hopeful sign that we are getting somewhere in educating the public about this dreadful danger for eagles.

Please do what you can to help: contact your legislators and other high-up government officials; write letters to the local papers. Share this website with your friends who still hunt with lead or who leave gut piles for coyotes and other scavengers: www.huntingwithlead.org  As with many States, making lead ammunition illegal in Maine is probably a long way off. But one thing that seems like it could be done fairly quickly is to regulate the proper disposal of the potentially toxic remains of all game killed with lead ammo - carcasses, gut piles, waste meat from game butchers, some of which is used as coyote bait. If we could keep this meat out of the field, the problem for eagles would pretty much disappear. 

Please hold this beauty in your hearts as our rehabbers work to save her life.

Follow us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Avian-Haven/381894018553252






Offline Faerie Gardener

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1,456
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #455 on: January 26, 2016, 03:48:50 PM »
 :eccry   :heart   Thank you Gze for doing so much to help these gorgeous birds.
"In all things of Nature there is something of the Marvelous"  -Aristotle

"A garden is never as good as it will be next year" -Anon

Offline gzebear

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 591
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #456 on: January 30, 2016, 03:43:52 PM »

Bald Eagle updates ...

I'm so sad to report that Bar Harbor mom did not survive her encounter with the power line, which was most likely a result of impaired coordination caused by lead poisoning. Her foot never regained circulation and it looked like her wing was going the same way. After discussion with State and Federal wildlife biologists, she was gently put to sleep.


"Union" however, the eagle rescued by the hubster and meself on New Year's Eve, is still with us. She finished the third round of chelation therapy which brought her lead level down quite a bit. It's not as low as we'd hoped to see it, so we'll re-test this weekend and she may have to do a fourth round. Meanwhile, she's flying fairly well, good landings, good appetite. She's not going for the high perches yet, but I have high hopes that, against all odds, she will make it.


               
                                   photo by Glori Berry, Avian Haven (no, her feathers are not really blue!)



Offline Faerie Gardener

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1,456
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #457 on: February 09, 2016, 02:09:52 PM »
Sad news from Bar Harbor  :eccry  Union does look good!
"In all things of Nature there is something of the Marvelous"  -Aristotle

"A garden is never as good as it will be next year" -Anon

Offline gzebear

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 591
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #458 on: March 16, 2016, 08:34:55 AM »


BAEA 114 Rockland
Another lead-poisoned Bald Eagle was admitted to Avian Haven this week. He had been reported Sunday afternoon, in a town about 10 miles away. By the time I got there he had flown off, and extensive search efforts were in vain. An onlooker had taken photographs and I could see from the picture and description of the eagle's behavior that it was probably another case of lead-poisoning. On Monday morning, we got another call. The same eagle was seen sitting on top of a huge pile of debris behind a big box store. When we arrived, he was still there. This pile of debris was about ten feet high and covered with old dried-up Christmas wreaths and trimmings from wild rose bushes, so it was a prickly climb to get to where I could capture him. He seemed exhausted and barely resisted my net. Diagnostics confirmed my assessment - lead poisoning, emaciation, severe debilitation. He is still alive but struggling for his life.


               "Rockland"
             
                                                                             photo by Glori Berry, Avian Haven


The same day, another lead-poisoned eagle was also rescued after flying into a semi, but was dead on arrival. The high blood lead level had no doubt contributed to the accident.

And one more sad note ... and thank you all for allowing me to share ... the eagle we rescued on New Year's Eve, "Union", did not survive her encounter with lead.

After three rounds of chelation, she seemed to be doing so much better. But we began to see typical signs of brain damage from her massive lead exposure, and those symptoms suddenly and dramatically worsened in February. Loss of visual perception and sensory-motor coordination were obvious when she began flying into walls. After lengthy discussions with State and Federal raptor biologists, the consensus was that it would be unfair to keep her going in this unhappy condition. I visited her on February 29, and she was quietly put to sleep the following day.

Fly free with your angel-wings, sweet love ... I am so sorry.


               "Union"
               
                                                                               photo by Glori Berry, Avian Haven



Well, that's a lot of sad news. We did admit our first nestlings of 2016, these plump healthy little Rock Pigeons who were evicted from their nesting site. I guess that's not really good news. But the babies are doing well and will be cared for by foster pigeon parents.


               


 :heart

Offline birdvoyer

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2,048
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #459 on: March 17, 2016, 10:49:50 AM »
I love to follow the wonderful work that Avain Haven does but so often it is just horribly heart breaking to read.   :ecsad  However, thankfully you are able to report the successes that are made possible thanks to the dedication of many.  Thank you for all that you do to make these successes happen.

Offline gzebear

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 591
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #460 on: March 17, 2016, 01:51:46 PM »

Here's a cheer-up ...

Two juvenile Northern Saw-whet Owls were rescued in late November, both with eye injuries as a result of collisions. The two owls (female, based on weight) spent most of the winter together in an outdoor habitat while they recovered from their injuries. By the time they were ready for release, both owls were quite plump! We released them together a couple weeks ago.


                     
                                                                             photo by Glori Berry, Avian Haven


 :heart

Offline birdvoyer

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2,048
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #461 on: March 17, 2016, 05:21:24 PM »
 :thumbup: Yay!  Wishing them a wonderful life in the wild. :heart

Offline Cawatcher

  • HEGPS
  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9,347
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #462 on: March 17, 2016, 08:53:39 PM »
 :biggrin3 Wonderful Gzebear

Offline jeavverhey

  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1,057
Re: Avian Haven Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center (Maine)
« Reply #463 on: March 18, 2016, 05:58:07 AM »
Sweet little owls. Great news Gze. Thank you for what you do and for keeping us posted.