Author Topic: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?  (Read 69996 times)

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Offline winterwren

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #30 on: October 09, 2010, 09:35:31 PM »
Passerine: I guess what I'm saying is that there may have been confusion somewhere, as the story got passed on, between the mom brooding and the chicks being brooded? the bird in your picture looks chick-like to me. The downy head, and what looks like partially grown feathers, and the size, make it look like a chick of the grouse family. If it is not, if THIS bird is sitting on eggs, then I really have no idea what it is and I'd love to learn more.
 :ecsmile

 

Offline luvthebirds

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #31 on: October 09, 2010, 10:03:57 PM »
We often see miner's lettuce when hiking the trails in Marin County here in No. California.  :ecsmile
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Offline birdvoyer

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #32 on: October 10, 2010, 07:55:26 AM »
Okay, now I am wondering if we have really solved the mystery of passerine's photo. I agree with wren, that passerine's bird  looks like a baby. Also, when I went back and compared the photo to the image at whatbird.com website, passerine's photo did not look at all like the adult, but possibly the babies?

Info from whatbird.com: (the image is copyright protected)


http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/1108/_/Sooty_Grouse.aspx

And the adult female from birdweb.org:



One other question I have is concerning the differences in two different images of the Siberian miner's lettuce. Blue's is totally different from the other.

 :puzzled2

(btw, passerine, I love this thread. Fun and interesting)

Offline passerine

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #33 on: October 10, 2010, 08:18:19 AM »
Wren i do believe you are right, my dgt. either misunderstood what she seen or i wasn't paying attention to what she said, the latter very possible. :really

Now i'm thinking like BV he's a Sooty Grouse or at least the grouse family, BUT he is a baby. Most likely close to the the same age as wrens ptarmigan.

Family-Turkeys and Grouse (Phasianidae)    Order- galliformes (that info from BVs above link)

So do we still think she/he's a Sooty only a youngin?

We have the plants - cleavers, Galium aparine & miner's lettuce. :thumbup:

Offline passerine

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #34 on: October 10, 2010, 08:22:59 AM »
One other question I have is concerning the differences in two different images of the Siberian miner's lettuce. Blue's is totally different from the other.
:puzzled2

Blue picture is totally different......Blue wrote this with the pic:
Quote
Nearly as common here is Miners' Lettuce, Claytonia perfoliata which also has 2 opposite leaves which are usually fused, forming a disk around the stem.

Offline birdvoyer

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #35 on: October 10, 2010, 08:34:21 AM »
 :blush Oooops, I guess I missed an important sentence. Thanks for pointing my nose in the right direction. I don't make a very good detective, do I?   :ecrolleyes

Offline passerine

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #36 on: October 10, 2010, 08:44:53 AM »
BV :heart

Offline nautilus

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #37 on: October 10, 2010, 12:39:03 PM »
Re: grouse/ptarmigan chick

Maybe it was "brooding" its own Dudley.  :ecwink

Just for the awww factor, here's another photo of a grouse chick, which are more common in forests,



and a couple of white-tailed ptarmigan chicks, which are more common above the timberline.






Offline BBE

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #38 on: October 10, 2010, 12:49:58 PM »
The 'grouse' chick is so colorful.

A friend came by and agreed that my 'mystery' bird may well be a non breeding / juvenile 'Sanderling'.

'Wren', your comment re 'Baie de Chaleurs' made me chuckle.  :biggrin6  I was told that lot of changes have occurred in that area and also on the Gaspe Peninsula.
Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. (Anonymous)
Avatar is of Karula (female leopard). May 1, 2013

Offline passerine

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #39 on: November 12, 2010, 10:39:14 AM »
Does anyone know the name of this tree, may have started as bush?  It's probably at least 20 years old, it blooms for a very short time with no aroma. Has thin Alder looking bark. The squirrels like the little buds at the end of the branches when it starts to green up in Spring.


Offline winterwren

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #40 on: December 10, 2010, 11:12:51 PM »
I've looked it up several times and keep thinking it's a mock orange, but the pattern of leaf veins is different, and I think mock orange is supposed to be fragrant? (though "this species is extremely variable in both vegetative and floral characters" -- Pojar and McKinnon)

The flowers and the general shape of the leaves do look like mock orange... I wish I knew for sure!

Wren

Offline passerine

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #41 on: December 11, 2010, 09:30:40 AM »
Wowser Wren you are good. :biggrin3 I think you may be right, I've been trying to id this tree for at least 7 years. I believe it was planted mid eighties & left to it's own till 7 years ago. It's 15 to 20 feet. The little squirrels go right to the end of the branches & eat the new little pods seed pods or somethin, really cute when they do this. It does nothing to wreck the blooms & like i said does not flower long. Thank-you. :ecsmile

Offline winterwren

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #42 on: December 11, 2010, 12:08:07 PM »
Ok, does the description of the fruit match?
"Oval, woody, 4-chambered capsules about 1 cm long." -- Pojar and McKinnon again.

That would be the sort of thing a squirrel would like...
 :ecsmile

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #43 on: December 11, 2010, 01:32:02 PM »
Wowser Wren you are good. :biggrin3 I think you may be right, I've been trying to id this tree for at least 7 years. I believe it was planted mid eighties & left to it's own till 7 years ago. It's 15 to 20 feet. The little squirrels go right to the end of the branches & eat the new little pods seed pods or somethin, really cute when they do this. It does nothing to wreck the blooms & like i said does not flower long. Thank-you. :ecsmile

Passerine, when I saw the squirrels in my backyard going to great lengths (literally) to get the new buds at the tips of new branches on my fruitless mulberry tree and eat them, I found out the reason.  Apparently they are higher in protein than the other buds and somehow the squirrels 'know' that. They do daring acrobatic stunts to get to those end buds.  Nature is amazing!   :eclove
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Offline passerine

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #44 on: December 12, 2010, 07:28:18 PM »
Ok, does the description of the fruit match?
"Oval, woody, 4-chambered capsules about 1 cm long." -- Pojar and McKinnon again.

That would be the sort of thing a squirrel would like...
 :ecsmile

I'll check next time i'm there. :ecsmile

Sure is tigger. :heart