Author Topic: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?  (Read 67913 times)

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Offline gzebear

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery
« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2010, 06:13:49 PM »
Sooty Grouse Chick it is!

Offline birdvoyer

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery
« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2010, 06:18:42 PM »


Nautilus, I think you are right...a Sooty grouse chick! Cute little thing.

Maybe, passerine, your daughter saw the baby and not the mama?

Offline passerine

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery
« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2010, 06:32:54 PM »
Nautilus & gzebear i believe we have it, thank-you. :thumbup: She was sitting on eggs BV. :ecsmile Thanks everyone for the assistance.


ETA http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sooty_Grouse/id  Map of their territory from Cornell

Offline nautilus

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery
« Reply #18 on: October 08, 2010, 06:37:05 PM »
Yeah! What do I win? What do I win?

If it is indeed a juvenile grouse, more info at http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/1108/_/Sooty_Grouse.aspx

BTW, I love that a group of grouse can be called a "chorus", "covey", "drumming", "grumbling", or "leash" of grouse.

Thanks for posting photo from web, Birdvoyer - haven't figured that out yet....

Offline passerine

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery
« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2010, 06:41:07 PM »
You gals win a trophy

Lots of names, wonder if they use the different names for specific areas or grouse type?

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery
« Reply #20 on: October 08, 2010, 08:23:13 PM »
Congratulations on the I.D.!!!  :clap  The pattern of thin white lines on the top/back is interesting.  :ecsmile

 :thumbup:
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Offline Thumper66

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery
« Reply #21 on: October 08, 2010, 08:35:40 PM »
Congratulations, Nautilus.  I've never heard of a Sooty Grouse Chick. They are cute. Good eye!!  :investigate2

Offline BBE

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #22 on: October 08, 2010, 09:57:37 PM »
In Sept. I spent a week at a beach on the Baie De Chaleur (Bathurst) in New Brunswick.
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaleur_Bay

'Common Sandpipers' were frequently seen running up and down the beach or walking on the sand bars.

My last day there I saw this bird, by itself, busy running around.  I couldn't hear a call.  Most people I asked said it was a 'sandpiper'.  The sun was directly on it so hard to tell if the:
1.  legs are black or greeny-black? They aren't yellow.

2. back is black (which it looked) or a dark brown.

I have checked Cornell's http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/search and http://whatbird.com/ 

My two thoughts are a:

1. Non-breeding 'Sanderling'  http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sanderling/id

2. Juvenile 'Least Sandpiper'  http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/least_sandpiper/id

Any help would be appreciated.   With thanks

BBE



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Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #23 on: October 08, 2010, 11:45:13 PM »
Beautiful pattern on that bird's feathers, BBE.  :ecsmile
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

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Offline gzebear

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #24 on: October 09, 2010, 05:09:21 AM »
passerine, I take noooo credit for ID-ing the grouse chick - all prizes go to Nautilus. But that is such a cute little bird ...

Offline Blue

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #25 on: October 09, 2010, 10:03:20 AM »
The plant is Siberian Miners' Lettuce - Claytonia siberica. It was an important plant to early miners and settlers because the leaves were used as salad greens.

Nearly as common here is Miners' Lettuce, Claytonia perfoliata which also has 2 opposite leaves which are usually fused, forming a disk around the stem.



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Offline passerine

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery
« Reply #26 on: October 09, 2010, 10:22:44 AM »
Without knowing the scale, my guess is Siberian miner's lettuce (a.k.a. candy flower), Montia (= Claytonia) sibirica.

Thanks Blue & Nautilus. :thumbup:

BBE
he does look like the Sanderling, their a lot of fun to watch, the Sandpiper group. :heart

eta Blue i guess they would both be good in salad, didn't realize they fuse to form one leaf. The  Claytonia perfoliata .

Offline nautilus

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery
« Reply #27 on: October 09, 2010, 12:17:15 PM »
Without knowing the scale, my guess is Siberian miner's lettuce (a.k.a. candy flower), Montia (= Claytonia) sibirica.

Finally figured out how to post the pix to go with this...



« Last Edit: October 09, 2010, 11:32:28 PM by BBE »

Offline winterwren

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #28 on: October 09, 2010, 03:38:46 PM »
I just found this new thread yesterday... what fun! what a good idea, Passerine, thank you!

Now that I have time to answer, almost all the pieces of the puzzle have been found! But I can tell you about the other plant mentioned, the one on the top right of the picture; it's called cleavers, Galium aparine. Together with the siberian miner's lettuce, it sets the scale... this bird is tiny!!!
I immediately had thought it looked like a grouse or ptarmigan chick... because of a close encounter I once had in the alpine zone on Vancouver Island:
(click to enlarge)

This is the chick of a white-tailed ptarmigan... this one has no true feathers yet, just the first down. It was so well camouflaged, it took me five minutes to locate it -- and it was right under my nose. So I can appreciate Passerine's sharp eye in spotting her little bird.
Look how similar the face and eyes and beak look to Passerine's photo!

I know next to nothing about the sandpiper family, and therefore cannot help BBE... Even if I know where la baie des Chaleurs is.  :ecsmile

Wren
« Last Edit: October 09, 2010, 11:28:24 PM by BBE »

Offline passerine

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Re: What are These? Can you Help Solve a Mystery?
« Reply #29 on: October 09, 2010, 05:24:08 PM »
The size is throwing me off too wren as a grouse/ptarmigan are.
Length
15.719.7 in
4050 cm

The bird i posted seems smaller judging from the plant life. :puzzled2
I put the two pictures side by each they do have similarities but also differences & because of ages too.

  :thumbup: Nautilus posting pic.