Author Topic: International Bird Rescue Research Center (California)  (Read 107201 times)

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Offline beans

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #15 on: November 14, 2009, 01:45:41 PM »
On October 26, the Coast Guard transported around 350 birds by plane from Oregon to Sacramento.  We picked them up in several vans, and they arrived at our hospital Saturday night.


Murres waiting to be loaded onto plane

The above picture shows flight crewmembers from Coast Guard Air Station Sacramento, Calif. and specialists from the International Bird Rescue Research Center loading pallets full of birdcages onto a C-130 Hercules aircraft.


Some of the cages being loaded


Slimed Loon in cage

video: Channel 7 News Report
Jean, California

Online Tigerlady105

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #16 on: November 14, 2009, 01:52:02 PM »
Thank you, Beans.  This is a real eye-opener.  You are doing very important work.   :heart
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline beans

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #17 on: November 14, 2009, 02:00:11 PM »
While we were in the middle of the agae bloom crisis, there was another bunker oil spill in San Francisco Bay at 6:45 AM on October 30.


A protective boom appears next to the Dubai Star in San Francisco Bay.

To read the stor and see the short video, go to this link:

Coast Guard Scoops Up Oil In San Francisco Bay
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2009, 02:09:36 PM »
A volunteer tubes a bird to keep him hydrated.  She is putting medications into the tube, after which she will attach the large syringe filled with electrolyte or water or special formula, as ordered by our veterinarian.  This is being done for all of the birds, at regular intervals.  It is like an assembly line.  Everything is organized, although it looks like chaos.  



This bird is being rinsed after her wash.  We used oxygenating showerheads and soft water.  All of the detergent must be thoroughly rinsed from her feathers before she goes to the drying room.  In the drying room, she will be placed in a net-bottomed pen with a special fan underneath directing warm air at her.  The pen is covered with a sheet to keep her toasty warm.



This is one of the pelagic pools where washed birds swim to regain their strength.  After they are washed, their waterproofing is thoroughly checked before they are put into the pool.  In addition to our own pools, each of which is on a filter system, we have brought in temporary pools.  With over 450 birds so far, we need these extra pools!



From the San Francisco Chronicle, October 28, 2009:

Quote
The seabirds flew 700 miles from Oregon to Fairfield, but not under their own power: Stricken by toxic algae, they were loaded onto a Coast Guard plane for emergency care at a bird rescue center.
The migratory birds, including grebes, murres, scoters and loons, have lost their waterproofing ability as a result of what is known as an algal bloom, which slimes them, strips them of their natural oils and leaves them wet and cold. The more seriously affected birds drown or die of hypothermia.
The culprit is a species of phytoplankton that has flourished in the Northwest as a result of warmer-than-usual ocean temperatures. Stormy weather has churned up the water, creating a sudsy foam that disrupts the alignment of a bird's feathers, which act like shingles on a roof to protect the creatures from the elements.
Thousands of birds have died in the past week as a result of the phenomenon off the coast of Oregon and Washington.
About 150 injured birds found on beaches were taken by van from Portland to the International Bird Rescue Research Center in Fairfield, arriving Saturday night. On Monday, 305 more birds were put into crates and flown by a Coast Guard C-130 Hercules to McClellan Air Force Base in Sacramento before being brought to the center…
Each bird is expected to stay anywhere from a week to 10 days. The cost of caring for the birds is mounting, and although the treatment is similar to what would happen after an oil spill, there's no oil involved in this disaster - and that means no responsible party will foot the bill, Holcomb said.
A number of groups helped fund Saturday's transport, and the Coast Guard donated Monday's flight. But the cost of rehabilitating the birds is expected to exceed $50,000, said Paul Kelway, a center spokesman.
To read the article, go to this link:  click here

Here's a video of the hospital, made on October 30.  I used my tiny Flip Video on breaks.  It fits into my pocket.  Sorry no footage of the washroom where the birds get baths, but most of the birds were already washed by this date.  The ones waiting for a bath weren't healthy enough to wash, so they need some more time.

video:  Rescue & Rehab of Birds in Algae Bloom

We had about 80 experienced volunteers and staff.  They came from wildlife centers all over California to help us!  Normally, we have three staff and perhaps five or so volunteers each day.
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #19 on: November 14, 2009, 02:16:59 PM »

Dr. Ziccardi releases a Surf Scoter at Berkeley waterfront

Fourteen birds rescued from last month's Dubai Star oil spill in San Francisco Bay were released back into the wild yesterday, taking their first tentative swim in the bay waters in Berkeley before flying out of sight.

The birds seemed reluctant to leave their pet carriers and fly to freedom at first. But when one brave American coot slipped out of the cage and skipped out over the water, 10 others quickly followed…


Released American Coots

Eleven American coots, one surf scoter and two tiny dunlins were released on Friday. The birds were rescued a day or two after the Oct. 30 oil spill, which dumped 400 to 800 gallons of oil into the bay. The birds were treated at the San Francisco Bay Oiled Wildlife Care and Education Center (IBRRC) in Fairfield.


Two Dunlins enjoy their new freedom

A total of 49 oiled birds were taken our hosital - 10 had been released before Friday and another eight are still being treated. Seventeen birds died at the facility and another 20 birds were found dead on the shore after the oil spill.
Caregivers spend the first day or two after rescuing birds just keeping them warm and feeding them.
 
Once the birds are stable, they're thoroughly washed, in a mixture of water and Dawn detergent. Then they're rinsed off and dried with warm fans.
If their feathers appear healthy and normal, the birds are allowed into an outdoor pool to make sure their weatherproofing is working again and that the birds are behaving in a normal birdlike fashion. If they aren't doing well they may be washed again. Treatment can take a few days or a few weeks.

To read the rest of the article in the San Francisco Chronicle, CLICK HERE

Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #20 on: November 14, 2009, 02:21:10 PM »
Now that we are "caught up," my next posts will describe what goes on in the hospital.  How we intake birds, their care, booties, donuts, etc. 

I generally volunteer Tuesdays and Fridays at the hospital.  But sometimes I'll go in an extra day.  On average, I work about six hours each time.  However, some days have been eleven hours.  At home, I work on projects for IBRRC.  More about that later. :ecsmile
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #21 on: November 14, 2009, 02:26:52 PM »
Thanks, Tigerlady, for your post.  If you follow this thread, you will learn a lot about  bird rehabilitation. 
Jean, California

Online Tigerlady105

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #22 on: November 14, 2009, 08:33:39 PM »
This is very interesting Beans.  We may want to link this topic to the Terrific Teachers' Lounge so they will be able to find it easily, too.   :nod2
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline beans

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #23 on: November 14, 2009, 08:38:49 PM »
Oh, I would like that, Tigerlady.  I'll have to watch my grammar!  :laugh:
Jean, California

Online Tigerlady105

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #24 on: November 14, 2009, 09:40:37 PM »
 :rotf1  Beans
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline Rajame

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #25 on: November 14, 2009, 10:28:04 PM »
Beans, thank you.  I appreciate your good work and the education.  Sometimes, we are so insulated and when facts of what it takes are right in front of us, as you have done so well, we are humbled.

Blessings to you and the group.  I stand amazed.

Rajame
Your soul lights up the room as if the sun is beaming directly.

Offline beans

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #26 on: November 15, 2009, 10:59:21 AM »
Thank you, rajame.  But the more I learn at IBRRC, the more I realize that I know so little.  I started out doing laundry and washing implements in the kitchen.  Now I'm working directly with the birds....  and doing laundry and washing implements.   :ecwink
Jean, California

Offline emptynester

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #27 on: November 15, 2009, 11:29:21 AM »
Wow beans, I am so proud that you are my friend.
You are teaching us so much as you learn about our feathered friends and how to help them in disastrous times for them.  It broke my heart to see all the pics of the oiled birds but to watch the process to help them is amazing.  So much time and love helping them.
I truly appreciate all the reports you post to educate each and everyone of us !  :heart
~~~ I am so happy to be here ~~~

Offline beans

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #28 on: November 15, 2009, 02:42:08 PM »
Thank you very much - I wasn't sure how many members were reading this thread.   :ecsmile
Jean, California

Offline NancyM

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Re: International Bird Rescue Research Center
« Reply #29 on: November 15, 2009, 03:33:59 PM »
I'm reading!  The IBRRC's work - and yours - is very inspiring to me.