Author Topic: Flora Native to Your Area  (Read 53516 times)

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Offline madrona

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Flora Native to Your Area
« on: September 15, 2010, 09:53:27 PM »
This is a place for us to discuss the plants that are native to our areas, or areas we have visited – from trees such as the endangered Garry Oaks on Vancouver Island (my area) to wildflowers and humble local mosses - and what they contribute to the local ecosystem.  We hope for lots of illustrations!
   Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to
      rather than what we are separate from. - Terry Tempest Williams

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2010, 10:26:43 PM »
This is going to be a great place to share ideas and pictures!  Thanks for making it, Madrona!    :eclove

The birds like these berries!

Pyracantha


2010 Tigerlady105
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Offline NancyM

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2010, 07:29:51 AM »
I do not live in Italy, but I made a trip there this past June.  We were in a beautiful area near the very tip of the "heel of the boot."  One day, while touring, we passed through a very hilly area near the sea. We stopped to look at something or other and I noticed these beautiful plants growing wild along the rocky hillside.  One of our Italian colleagues explained that this was the plant that yields capers!  I had no idea the flowers were so beautiful. For that matter, I'm not sure that I knew that capers were the small tight buds of this species.

Wikipedia says this species is "present in almost all the circum-Mediterranean countries and is included in the floristic composition of most of them but whether it is indigenous to this region is uncertain. Although the flora of the Mediterranean region has considerable endemism, the caper bush could have a tropical origin, been only naturalized in the Mediterranean basin." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caper


Capparis spinosa L.




Offline boonibarb

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2010, 08:10:03 AM »


Beautiful flowers & plant!
i LOVE seeing what grows under rocky/dry conditions.
Lovely fotos Nancy.

Someone told me that capers are also the buds of Nasturtiums?
i wonder if that is false information.
wooohoooo!

Offline madrona

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2010, 09:44:57 AM »
What a gorgeous picture of the Pyracantha berries, Tigerlady!  The birds certainly do love the berries, and I wonder if they also help spread the plants?

I was curious to find out whether this plant, the shrub Pyracantha coccinea Roem (firethorn) was indeed native to N. America.  In reading about it, I discovered that it is Native to parts of Asia and Europe (Click)  A Plant distribution map indicates that it is also native to British Columbia - (See Here) and introduced into the US.

I recall that it was quite common in England, and when I visited a friend in France, where it is apparently a native plant, he was so concerned about security for his property that in addition to a gate and surveillance camera, he had incorporated Pyracantha alongside his wall to deter intruders!  It is certainly a very thorny plant.   :eceek

I was interested to discover that it is related to Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster Horizontalis has become so invasive in some parts of England that it has been banned!)  It is a 'volunteer' plant that springs up all over our yard here on Vancouver Island, and is especially loved by the ground-foraging birds like the juncos and towhees - and I am sure that birds are responsible for spreading it.   This photo, taken this morning shows it growing in our yard, where the birds planted it (beside a small holly bush also planted by birds).   :ecsmile 



This plant is also native to parts of Asia, but has likely been introduced and naturalized here. 

 
   Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to
      rather than what we are separate from. - Terry Tempest Williams

Offline passerine

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2010, 11:11:30 AM »
Beautiful plant Nancy, since they grow wild there, is probably one of the reasons they're prevalent in Mediterranean diets.

I looked up the firethorn too Mad. :ecwink it says that Robins, Blackbirds, Thrushes, House Sparrows & Waxwings are attracted to them. Apparently the birds can get some what drunk form the berries. The butterfly the Holly blue will also lay its eggs on pyracantha and the caterpillar eats the flowers and berries! Bees love the flowers for nectar.. Sounds like a great plant to get if someones is wanting to attract wildlife.

One article i read said it was a member of the rose family.

Disclaimer: These are articles from the net i have no personal knowledge of this plant.

Offline madrona

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2010, 12:52:39 PM »
Nancy - I love capers - they are great, liberally sprinkled on cold-smoked salmon slices (lox) and thinly sliced onion on rye bread!   :biggrin6

I learned from orovalaz (a HEG member) that capers are actually pickled flower buds - she lived on Crete in the Mediterranean for some time.  She showed me photos too and I thought then that the flowers were exquisite.

I have often wondered if they would grow here - although, of course, we should be very careful about introducing non-native species. :nope  Our rocky and southern exposure (where I live) has a distinctive Mediterranean feel - to the extent that we actually have an olive tree and fig trees.  I did notice, from reading the info in the URL you posted, that capers don't tolerate frost well, so it's maybe not a good idea, and might be why I haven't seen them around here - we do get some frost in the winter on Vancouver Island, for sure.
   Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to
      rather than what we are separate from. - Terry Tempest Williams

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2010, 01:31:23 PM »
I have had pyracantha in the backyard for years and it does well here, since we have a Mediterranean climate.  We get an occasional frost, but it climbs all over the neighbor's garage roof if it isn't pruned once-in-awhile and seems to get enough shelter and absorbed warmth there so it doesn't die off. 

In Northern California, is grows along many roads in neighborhoods where people have planted it.  This time of year, the berries start coloring...turning from green to yellow to orange and then the well-known bright red.  It's a marker for the holidays that are on the way and I love to see the changes when I watch the berries transform into bright red.  Very festive-looking! :biggrin6

We tried hibiscus and bougainvillea in the backyard, too, but it's too cold for both of them there, so they have to be in the front yard.  Micro-climates can be tricky!   :ecsmile
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Offline passerine

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2010, 01:45:16 PM »
I have had pyracantha in the backyard for years and it does well here, since we have a Mediterranean climate.  We get an occasional frost, but it climbs all over the neighbor's garage roof if it isn't pruned once-in-awhile and seems to get enough shelter and absorbed warmth there so it doesn't die off. 

snip
Tigger it's the capers that like the Mediterean climate, pyracantha does well here on VI.

Mountain Ash has the red berries Robins & Waxwings like too, I've been keeping a close eye for the birds to start in on them, as there is a street in town lined with them so hoping to get some good pics.

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2010, 02:12:56 PM »
Mountain Ash is beautiful, especially with the red berries!   :ecsmile  The leaves are interesting, too. :nod2

I like a few capers with smoked salmon and a little lemon juice added for flavor. Yummmmmm :ecsmile
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Offline madrona

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2010, 03:48:44 PM »
The birds have now stripped all the berries off the Mountain Ash trees (just saplings that the birds must have planted over the years).  I did take some photos earlier, over a month ago.


Above is the one that we let continue to grow in our flower bed.


Close up of the berries.

After a little research on the Mountain Ash I discovered that there are 4 species native to Canada -
The Canadian Encyclopedia.

Quote from: The Canadian Encyclopedia
Mountain Ash (Sorbus) are a genus of small trees or shrubs of the rose family (Rosaceae), consisting of perhaps 100 species distributed in temperate Eurasia and North America. Plants are deciduous, lack thorns, and have simple or pinnate (feather-like) leaves with 9-11 leaflets. Creamy white flowers form large, flat-topped clusters. Small, red, applelike fruits are much sought after by birds. There are 4 species native to Canada, usually found in moist woods: 2 eastern (S. americana, S. decora) and 2 western (S. scopulina, S. sitchensis).

I discovered more interesting information about the Mountain Ash (Sorbus) here
Quote from: Dave's Garden
Many northern gardeners are familiar with Sorbus, known as mountain-ash in North America or rowans in Europe. These relatively small trees are wonderful additions to the garden for their floral display of white flowers in spring, attractive crop of orange-red berries in autumn  and if you want to attract fruit-eating birds to your garden, then mountain-ash are one of the best woody plants to cultivate. However, what you may not know is that this genus of about 50 species shows considerable variation. While the common garden varieties are trees up to 12 m, there are some species that barely reach a foot! We typically think of mountain-ash as having orange-red fruit but among the many species that exist, this is a rare colour; white coloured berries are far more common, but they also come in yellow, pink and many subtle, in-between shades. And as common as mountain-ash are in North America and Europe, we, as a whole, have relatively few native species; the vast majority hail from the Himalayas.

Last edited 11:50 PM PDT Sept 16
   Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to
      rather than what we are separate from. - Terry Tempest Williams

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2010, 06:20:31 PM »
Madrona, the birds are smart. They drop the seeds and then harvest the berries when they grow on the trees!   :chuckle
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2011, 03:40:37 PM »
   Rose from the garden
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2011, 07:06:46 PM »
Gorgeous rose, Gmadeb!  It's now starring as a puzzle on our forum puzzle thread!   :eclove
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Offline Faerie Gardener

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Re: Flora Native to Your Area
« Reply #14 on: June 07, 2011, 08:43:57 PM »
I'm amazed at the beautiful tulip varieties that are available now. Here's one from the Faerie Garden that looks and even SMELLS like a rose!!

    


« Last Edit: June 08, 2011, 05:42:17 PM by passerine »
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