Author Topic: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest  (Read 85232 times)

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Offline sparkie

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #30 on: August 30, 2010, 05:38:43 AM »
      Thank you   typos ,for the  link to the  Nova Scotia re-habs.  Very Interesting  articles.  Enjoyed  seeing the  videos you  posted from Alberta. Beavers are very  cute to  watch. I spent  hours in  Algonquin Park Watching  beavers in their  natural habitat  busy going about their  business.Thanks  Nancym :thumbup:

Offline Maria dB

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #31 on: August 30, 2010, 06:37:22 AM »
A very interesting article on the oiled eagle. How on earth did it get covered in cooking oil? Guess we will never know  :puzzled2 The video of the beavers kept stopping and I had to move the cursor along, but it was a joy to watch. My name literally translated from Dutch is 'the beaver'. My Dad a brother, myself and some other rellies had 2 front beaver teeth (mine are false now) :rotf1

Offline mew

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #32 on: October 07, 2010, 08:43:16 AM »
A friend in Alaska sent me the following link of a story about 2 rehabbed fallen eaglets up there.  http://redoubtreporter.wordpress.com/2010/10/06/eagles%E2%80%99-flight-to-path-has-bumpy-start-%E2%80%94-hatchlings-rescued-after-nest-collapse/

Very interesting.   

Offline beans

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #33 on: October 07, 2010, 09:22:33 AM »
A good story!  Thanks for sharing it with us. 
Jean, California

Offline birdvoyer

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #34 on: October 07, 2010, 09:23:29 AM »
Very nice article Mew. Thanks for sharing it. As awareness increases about how important our wildlife is to our environment, we are hearing more and more success stories about these magnificent birds. Perhaps these eagle parents are young and inexperienced. There have been a few nest failure stories in the two years that I have started learning about the eagles. It is hard to know exactly why but it is my hope that they will be more successful this coming season. Some were not as lucky as these two.  :ecsad

Offline BBE

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #35 on: October 27, 2010, 01:44:24 PM »
Good and bad news stories related to Syncrude Oil

In 2008 I posted (on HWF) the story about a major oil spill in Syncrude's tailings pond in Northern Alberta.
Syncrude was charged for the deaths of 1600 waterbirds in one of its oil tailings ponds in Alberta.

The good news: from October 23, 2010:
Judge approves $3M creative sentence in dead ducks case
 Syncrude also fined $800,000

By Darcy Henton, edmontonjournal.com

Quote
ST. ALBERT Conservation groups rejoiced Friday over a historic $3-million creative sentence handed
to Syncrude Canada.

Provincial Court Judge Ken Tjosvold approved the unique sentence as an appropriate penalty for the company's
failure to take reasonable action to prevent the deaths of more than 1,600 ducks on a toxic settling basin more
than two years ago.

Syncrude was fined $800,000 and ordered to pay an additional $2.2 million toward research and
conservation projects.

Read the full story at:
HERE

The bad news story: Today

More ducks land on Syncrude Canada oil sands pond
Reuters Environmental Online Report - 5 hours ago
(Reporting by Scott Haggett; editing by Peter Galloway)

Quote
CALGARY, Alberta (Reuters) - More ducks have landed on a tailings pond owned by Syncrude Canada Ltd,
three days after Syncrude was ordered to pay a C$3 million ($2.9 million) penalty for a similar incident that
killed 1,600 ducks and helped fuel environmental opposition to Canada's oil sands.

An unknown number of ducks landed on Syncrude's Mildred Lake settling basin in the northern Alberta oil sands
on Monday night, the province of Alberta's environment department said on Tuesday. Though the exact number
of ducks isn't known, Alberta Environment said some of them were heavily oiled.


Read the full story at:
HERE

The noon TV news today is reporting that up to 300 ducks were killed.  
Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. (Anonymous)
Avatar is of Karula (female leopard). May 1, 2013

Offline passerine

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #36 on: October 27, 2010, 01:49:54 PM »
The fines aren't high enough for example they were fined $300, 000,000 some to go back into prevention. That obviously didn't work. :ecsad Two other tailing ponds also have dead birds in them, Shell & forget.
They need to clean up & close the tailing ponds.

Syncrude being fined 3 million is a drop in the bucket as they make 7 million a day.

Offline BBE

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #37 on: October 27, 2010, 01:54:10 PM »
Now some really great news about the Whooping Cranes

Cranes make whoopee during Canadian stay Near-record number of new chicks boosts the
last surviving wild flock of the continent's tallest birds
 By Randy Boswell, Postmedia News October 27, 2010

Quote
North America's imperilled whooping crane population -- which had experts in a panic just
18 months ago after nearly 10 per cent of the giant birds died in their wintering grounds in Texas --
has rebounded after a banner summer season in northern Canada where a near-record number of chicks hatched.

The unexpected resurgence of the last surviving natural flock of the continent's tallest bird -- one of Canada's
 most endangered species -- has wildlife officials on the Gulf Coast in Texas excitedly awaiting this fall's arrival
of the cranes after their epic, annual flight south from Wood Buffalo National Park along the
Alberta-Northwest Territories border.

Read more: HERE

Unfortunately the two photos in the paper do not come with the article.
Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. (Anonymous)
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Offline NancyM

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #38 on: November 10, 2010, 12:30:58 PM »
The Montreal Gazette ran this article today (Nov. 10):
http://www.montrealgazette.com/technology/Roadkill+oldest+bald+eagle+ever+documented+wild/3804859/story.html

Roadkill is oldest bald eagle ever documented in wild
by RANDY BOSWELL, Postmedia News

An eagle hit by a car in New Brunswick was found to be 32 years, 10 months old.

Excerpt:
Based on its band number, the New Brunswick bird is known to have been tagged as a chick on June 23, 1977 - two months before the death of Elvis Presley -near Perry, Me., about 40 kilometres southof St. Stephen in the southeast corner of the state.

Offline madrona

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #39 on: November 10, 2010, 12:56:56 PM »
Thanks Nancy for posting that.  I read it this morning and was looking for a place to post it.  Fascinating that they were able to determine its age.

Quote
Biologists have traced the metal ring on the raptor's leg to a bird-banding program in Maine in 1977, making the avian accident victim the oldest bald eagle ever documented in the wild....

.... <snip> the eagle's record-setting age -- pegged at 32 years, 10 months -- suggests habitat rehabilitation efforts and other bi-national conservation measures are giving members of the majestic species a much better chance of living a long, well-fed life than they had 40 years ago.
Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/technology/Bald+eagle+killed+oldest+found+wild/3805116/story.html#ixzz14unmyo3U

   Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to
      rather than what we are separate from. - Terry Tempest Williams

Offline boodle317

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #40 on: November 10, 2010, 01:05:17 PM »
An eagle survives 32 yr 10 months in the wild and then it's life is ended by a car?   :sad

Offline madrona

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #41 on: November 10, 2010, 01:16:33 PM »
Makes me wonder if it wasn't failing in some way Boodle.  You'd think after reaching that age it would be wary.   :sad  It is certainly a sad ending for it.  But the fact that it was banded and its age could be determined is very useful for BE statisticians.
   Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to
      rather than what we are separate from. - Terry Tempest Williams

Offline NancyM

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #42 on: November 10, 2010, 02:01:17 PM »
I have read about other eagles being hit by cars - a newly fledged one from California a couple of years ago was hit by a car in Nevada.  I have read that if an eagle is eating road kill, they often can not get out of the way of an oncoming car fast enough to avoid injury themselves.

The article in the Montreal paper was a little longer than the Vancouver one- they did not elaborate on the accident, but did mention another long-lived eagle:
Last month, a dead bird discovered on a roadside near Duluth, Minn., was found to have been tagged in that state in June 1978, making it the second-oldest bald eagle recorded in the wild after the New Brunswick individual.

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/technology/Roadkill+oldest+bald+eagle+ever+documented+wild/3804859/story.html#ixzz14v3QZjPM


Offline BBE

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #43 on: November 10, 2010, 02:08:29 PM »
The two stories above are both very interesting in that the eagles were banded and hence could be tracked re longevity.  The more we watch the eagles the more we learn about them.
Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. (Anonymous)
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Offline madrona

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Re: Wildlife Rehabilitation cases and stories of interest
« Reply #44 on: November 10, 2010, 03:10:04 PM »
I can't find another place to put this story, but I think it is interesting in that it is about starlings - birds that are not native to N. America, but with which we are all familiar.  (Frequent visitors to the Hornby nest!)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/8123164/Starling-ballet-in-danger-as-bird-population-declines.html

Quote
Starling 'ballet' in danger as bird population declines
As dark clouds of starlings gather for the annual migration, conservationists are warning the birds could be in danger of dying out because of modern farming practices...
   Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to
      rather than what we are separate from. - Terry Tempest Williams