Author Topic: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre (Vancouver Island)  (Read 65135 times)

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Offline Blue

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2010, 06:41:11 PM »
Wonderful video, passerine.  Thanks for posting it -also NIWRC's FaceBook page.
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Offline Blue

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2010, 06:34:14 PM »
As part of the Brant Festival, there will be an eagle release.  From the website:

The 2010 Brant Wildlife Festival will run from March 5 to April 28 in Parksville and Qualicum Beach on Vancouver Island, BC.  The annual eagle release for 2010 will be April 24th at 2pm right at the centre.

We are honoured for the 2010 release to have Bruce Williams of A Channel send the bald eagle to freedom.  NIWRA is thankful to Bruce for his expertise with non-profit organizations and how he has endeavoured to help us better what we do.


(Thanks to member Jean for telling us about the eagle release.)
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Offline Blue

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2010, 11:21:58 AM »
 Tuesday July 27 2010
 
Young eagle may have been coated in cooking oil
 
Sylvia Campbell
Oceanside Star


Thursday, July 15, 2010


 
Looking a little less than majestic, this oiled bird is now drying off after being carefully washed by animal care workers at the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre.
 
Did you know that a seemingly harmless dime-sized glob of oil could kill a bird?

When a bird encounters oil on the surface of the water, the oil sticks to its feathers, causing them to mat and separate, impairing the waterproofing and exposing the animal's sensitive skin to extremes in temperature.

This can result in hypothermia, meaning the bird becomes cold, or hyperthermic, which results in overheating.

Instinctively, the bird tries to get the oil off its feathers by preening, which results in the animal ingesting the oil. This ingestion can cause severe damage to the bird's internal organs.

The focus on preening overrides all other natural behaviours, including feeding and evading predators, making the bird vulnerable to secondary health problems, such as severe weight loss, anemia and dehydration.

Many oil-soaked birds lose their buoyancy and beach themselves in their attempt to escape the cold water.

The fortunate ones are picked up by concerned citizens or capture crews.

To wash a bird that is already highly stressed and not medically stable could mean its death. Many oiled birds die because well-meaning people, anxious to get oil off the bird, wash it immediately, resulting in death from stress.

It is actually more important to give oiled birds the much-needed nutrition, hydration and medical treatment they need before they are washed.

This last week the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre was called regarding a young eagle that could not fly.

It was found on Pym Street and Doehle Avenue in Parksville and, when our wildlife assistant rescued the bird, it seemed to be covered in a type of oil.

It looked more like cooking oil as it was denser than regular motor oil.

The bird had been sitting on the side of the road for quite a while but was being watched by a concerned citizen.

At the Centre, after many days of monitoring the health of the bird, it was finally washed with Dawn liquid soap and left to dry in the warm sun.

The eagle flew to a low perch and, by the end of the day, was able to make it to a higher perch.

Although he had a good washing, he may have to wait for an entire moult before release.

The bird upon examination was quite thin and very hungry. It is eating well now.

Prognosis is somewhat unknown but most oiled birds with care can be released.

If anyone is aware of oily substances in that area of Parksville, the Centre would like to obtain that information.

Remember, as the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre is a non-profit organization, 'We Depend on You.' Visit www.niwra.org.

Oceanside Star 2010
 

Copyright 2010 CanWest Interactive, a division of CanWest MediaWorks Publications, Inc.. All rights reserved.
 
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Offline NancyM

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2010, 12:29:55 PM »
The Hornby eaglets (Niner and Brig) and Rebecca from Quadra are now at NIWRA so they can use the large flight cage there.

NIWRA posted on their Facebook page:
 http://www.facebook.com/pages/North-Island-Wildlife-Recovery-Centre/47885409113?ref=ts&v=wall#!


There are currently 9 eagles in the flight cage.  We received 3 juveniles (born this spring) from Mountainaire Avian Rehab near Courtenay.  They are taking advantage of the flight cage space to build their flight muscles for release.  Two are from Hornby Island and one from Quadra.  They appear larger than our adult eagles due to their "training" feathers.  Young eagles have longer flight feathers in their 1st year to compensate for their inexperience in the air.  Once these eagles are ready they will most likely be returned to Mountainaire for release.

Offline passerine

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2010, 01:49:27 PM »
Maybe when their ready to go back i could help with their transportation if needed. :heart

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #20 on: September 03, 2010, 02:00:05 PM »
Nancy, thanks for the information and links...I took a look at them and found the Hawaiian Islands Humback Whale link...very interesting a lots of educational activities for teachers and students.   :ecsmile

It looks as if the three eaglets that have been moved to the NIWRC as doing well.  Yay for MARS and now NIWRC!   :thumbup:
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Offline NancyM

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2010, 12:10:57 PM »
Anyone in the area might like to visit NIWRA on Saturday September 11.  This note is posted on their Facebook page:

NIWRA will be hosting another fun filled Family Day with many events planned on September 11 from 12:00-4pm. Admissions will be free!

Offline Blue

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2010, 02:19:30 PM »
 Sunday September 5 2010
 
Gaming funds to stop coming for NIWRC, Campbell warns
 


Thursday, September 02, 2010


The North Island Wildlife Recovery Association is facing a funding crunch as its scrambles to help a rising number of animals in distress.

Sylvia Campbell, who founded the Errington centre with Robin Campbell, said the $31,000 the association gets in direct-access provincial gaming funds will be reduced by a third next week. A year from now, it won't receive any gaming funds at all.

Public donations are down by 25% and admissions to the centre have dropped by about 20%.

"We're scrambling to find some other funding from the public sector," said Sylvia Campbell.

School tours are also down about 36% as school districts on Vancouver Island cut spending. "This is a huge thing for us. School tours is one of the ways we educate the kids," said Campbell.

"This isn't like they're coming to go down water slides. This is educational and something that's important to the stewardship of animals and to our environment."

She hopes to develop partnerships with corporations or service groups over the year to secure funding to replace the $31,000 that will be lost in the summer of 2011.

If another source of ongoing funding isn't found, and other revenue sources don't pick up, the centre may have to lay off the equivalent of one full-time employee. Currently, the NIWRA employs two full-time and five part-time workers, who are already taxed, said Campbell. "We can't afford to lose an employee."

Robin Campbell said the centre has had a busy summer. In the past week alone, it's seen a blue heron, raccoon, turkey vulture, two barred owls, rabbits and song birds come through its doors.

"And difficult cases, too," he said, adding many of the animals were badly injured. "I think there's more people out there finding stuff."

For more information, go to www.niwra.org.

Oceanside Star 2010
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Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2010, 04:17:10 PM »
**Sigh**   Those funding cuts are terrible blows to so many worthwhile wildlife rehab facilities...   :eccry
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Offline Blue

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2010, 10:33:52 AM »
We have received this email:

We visited the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre Wednesday. There were 7 (we think!) juvenile eagles and 2 adults in the flight barn. The only one we could identify was Decker with his missing tail feathers...can't gain any height but he's doing well. Everyone else was happy, flying about and I am sure looking forward to freedom.   It is always such a privilege to be this close to these magnificent birds.  We thank you for your rescue of these birds.
Sandy and Dick
Campbell River BC







Thankyou, Sandy and Dick!






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Offline madrona

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #25 on: September 10, 2010, 10:41:41 AM »
Quote
We visited the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre Wednesday. There were 7 (we think!) juvenile eagles and 2 adults in the flight barn. The only one we could identify was Decker with his missing tail feathers...can't gain any height but he's doing well. Everyone else was happy, flying about and I am sure looking forward to freedom.   It is always such a privilege to be this close to these magnificent birds.  We thank you for your rescue of these birds.
Sandy and Dick
Campbell River BC






Thankyou, Sandy and Dick!

Hmmm - Decker is still at Mountainaire, I believe.  AJL has been in contact with Maj at MARS and yesterday they discussed Decker and his most recent measurements. CLICK HERE. So there must be another young eagle with missing tail feathers. 

I hope to visit NIWRC soon, and will try for some photos through the viewing windows.

Edited to add: I just saw the photos so I have modified my post by quoting that post for this new page.   Thanks so much for posting them Sandy and Dick.
   Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to
      rather than what we are separate from. - Terry Tempest Williams

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #26 on: September 10, 2010, 10:53:48 AM »
That must have been a great visit, seeing the eagles flying now. Being together must be fun for them at this age.  It's what they would be doing at the salmon runs and for the next few years...hanging out with their peers until they are mature adults.   :eclove
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Offline Blue

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #27 on: September 18, 2010, 04:21:51 PM »
Some of you may remember adorable young Sandor at NIWRC





Sandor is nearly grown up (4 years old now) and watched over the huge Family Day activities last Saturday.

Sandor is a permanent resident at NIWRC. One of his wings was so badly broken in a highway collision that he is unable to fly.  He is being trained to get used to people so that he can visit schools and other events.


SANDOR


(That could be Robin Campbell in the jean jacket and white hat sitting on the right.)
« Last Edit: June 07, 2012, 08:43:26 AM by Blue »
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Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #28 on: September 18, 2010, 04:47:01 PM »
Blue, thanks for posting the pictures of Sandor.  He's very good-looking in his 4-year old almost all white head!   :eclove  That helps to see how filled-in the white feathers on his head look for future reference re other almost-mature eagles.
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

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Offline Sunny

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Re: North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre
« Reply #29 on: September 18, 2010, 08:06:53 PM »
I am a newby and really do not know what forum I need to access to  find out how the rescued eaglets are doing at NIWRc(sp). I have seen nothing recently in the sites I have visited. Any help and Info would be greatly appreciated. I feel so connected since Phoenix, I want the Best for our Eaglets.....
Thanx
Sunny :dunno :heart