Author Topic: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)  (Read 28580 times)

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Offline AJL

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REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« on: February 04, 2010, 08:46:56 PM »
The Raptor Education Group (REGI) is located in Antigo, Wisconsin. It was founded by Marge Gibson, a renowned and respected wildlife rehabilitator and researcher who has lead the field for many years.
REGI works with birds of all kinds, but Marge is undoubtedly the queen of Bald eagles.

Website: http://www.raptoreducationgroup.org

Winter brings many cases of lead poisoning. Once again, Marge spent the night with a critically ill, poisoned bird.  Blog: http://raptoreducationgroup.blogspot.com

For some, it is too late. But in Marge Gibson's hands, there are second chances.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vV3a_XyHysw" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vV3a_XyHysw</a>
« Last Edit: March 28, 2010, 12:23:02 PM by NancyM »
There is nothing in which the birds differ more from man than the way in which they can build and yet leave a landscape as it was before.  ~Robert Lynd, The Blue Lion and Other Essays

Offline beans

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2010, 11:17:05 PM »
Thank you, AJ, for telling us about REGI.  I watched the video, too.  Made me so happy to see these birds released back to the wild. 
Jean, California

Offline NancyM

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2010, 12:10:18 PM »
Winter brings many cases of lead poisoning. Once again, Marge spent the night with a critically ill, poisoned bird.  Blog: http://raptoreducationgroup.blogspot.com

I have been following the REGI blog for a while now. Marge does such wonderful work, and it is clear that she suffers along with each animal that comes into her care. Sadly, the eagle that she talked about in the Feb 4 post died. Her most recent (Feb 10) blog entry reported the death and included a picture is very distressing, you can see just how sick this poor eagle was: REGI blog Feb 10

Offline beans

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2010, 07:47:16 PM »
The death of this eagle breaks my heart
Jean, California

Offline NancyM

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2010, 07:37:54 PM »
REGI has been so busy over the past season that the blog entries have been few.  However, the latest post is really distressing - it is about a loon whose beak was wrapped with a fishing line and sinker.

http://raptoreducationgroup.blogspot.com/2010/10/loon-with-beak-wrapped-with-fishing.html




From the blog:
Photo: This Common Loon, in immature plumage, was found on Sunday with fishing line wrapped around her beak, tongue and neck. Note the lead sinker attached to the line. People sometimes ask us how lead sinkers could possibly affect wildlife. This is how. The loon was unable to eat or even drink due to the position the line held her tongue, beak and neck.


<snip>
Fishing line was wound around her beak and neck. A lead sinker was visible on the side of her mouth. The fishing line was twisted around her tongue in such a way that she was unable to eat or even drink. The loon could open her mouth only 1/2 inch. To complicate matters, she had apparently had this problem for some time as she was near starvation.

We rushed her to the REGI clinic. My great staff had all the things we needed including wire cutters and electrolyte fluid ready when we drove up. We worked on the loon carefully to extricate her from the line. The tongue was wrapped tight. I worried about long term damage to her mouth. Gratefully, this morning she seems to be doing well. She has an uphill battle, however, to recover from starvation. We will work hard to make sure she has a future."



More information and pictures on the REGI blog. http://raptoreducationgroup.blogspot.com/2010/10/loon-with-beak-wrapped-with-fishing.html

Offline luvthebirds

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2010, 11:44:17 PM »
That is so sad and should not happen.  Hope they can save the poor loon.

btw  I was very proud of mr. ltb yesterday. We were at a reservoir and he spotted fishing line dangling in the water, attached to the pier.  The line had a hook on it.  Mr. ltb extricated the line and removed it from the water.  He then said, "well maybe we saved a bird".  :heart  I wish that more fishermen would be careful with their line and attached items.  :sad
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Offline emc

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2010, 11:53:00 PM »
Ahhhh   good for Mr. LTB .  Well done.... :biggrin6

beth
from California

Offline gzebear

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2010, 01:42:34 AM »
I'm so glad someone found this loon and knew what to do. Thank you, REGI, for caring for this beautiful bird.

Lead sinkers are also a deadly poison. They have caused death by lead poisoning in MANY loons. Hopefully they will be banned before long. Not just loons but many other fishing birds and waterfowl, including eagles.

Offline Rajame

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2010, 09:04:46 AM »
Yes, thank you to Mr LTB. I swear everytime someone says fishing line or is fishing or goes fishing or talks fishing, Mr Rajame tells them not to leave line and to pick it up if they see it anywhere. My brother and his boys are now avid line pickerupers! That picture of the loon is something I wish could be splashed all over the news as a reminder.  :heart
Your soul lights up the room as if the sun is beaming directly.

Offline NancyM

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2010, 10:51:10 AM »
REGI blog Oct 15
http://raptoreducationgroup.blogspot.com/2010/10/adult-bald-eagle-admitted-loon-making.html

QUOTE:
Our Common Loon is making progress. We are cautiously optimistic for her recovery. Aspergillosis is a fungal infection that can be a serious problem in loons and other avian species when they are physiologically stressed. She is treated twice a day with anti fungal oral medication to prevent aspergillosis.

Meanwhile she is swimming several times a day now and while still being tube fed emaciation diet she is also eating minnows ravenously on her own. Keep her in your thoughts as she has a long way to go.


The bald eagle they admitted has high levels of lead, and perhaps other toxins (discussed in the blog).

Offline NancyM

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2011, 08:13:49 AM »
Other difficult cases have been handled by Marge Gibson at REGI.  This news story about eagles that were feeding at a landfill and were unintentionally poisoned was posted on May 20.  When Marge got them in early April they were near death (some people thought they were dead). Now, they are about to be released - this woman is amazing.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/20/us-eagles-wisconsin-idUSTRE74J64E20110520

Bald eagles poisoned in Wisconsin ready for release

(Reuters) - Seven bald eagles found poisoned and near death in April at a northern Wisconsin landfill are fully recovered and ready to be released back into the wild, a woman who helped nurse them back to health, Marge Gibson, said on Friday.
<snip>

Seven of the large birds were found comatose and close to death at an Eagle River, Wisconsin-area landfill on April 9 after ingesting an undisclosed substance from a plastic container.
<snip>

"There were seven bald eagles that we could find, and most of them looked very dead," Gibson said. "Some of them were even covered with blankets because people thought they were dead."

Gibson said she was up for two straight days caring for the birds,
<snip>

The incident represents the largest known documented bald eagle poisoning event in recent U.S. history, she said.
<snip>

Gibson said the poisoning was unintentional, as the birds were sickened by something thrown out in the trash. She declined to disclose the cause.

"People need to be aware of how their activities can affect wildlife," Gibson said.

(Writing and reporting by John Rondy; Editing by David Bailey and Greg McCune)

Offline birdvoyer

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2011, 09:39:22 AM »
Thanks Nancy for posting this. She is truly amazing.  :nod2

But, as I pondered the info, I thought of how many other animals may have been killed by the very same contents, or other refuge somewhere else. What a mind boggling thought...where to begin? At home is my first answer. Information like the above is next. We can do our best to make others aware of things they may never have considered as they toss unwanted garbage.

Offline NancyM

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2011, 10:12:58 PM »
We have not paid enough attention to REGI, which is the first rehab center that I ever learned about (from AJL). A  recent article caught my attention:

Link: http://www.antigodailyjournal.com/full.php?id=13086




~~~~
Summer weather adds to raptor center's workload
Wednesday, July 27, 2011

The tornadoes and other storms that swept through Wisconsin in recent months have taken a toll on eagles and other birds, and filled Antigo’s Raptor Education Group to overflowing.

“We currently have 264 birds in care, including 32 bald eagles,” Marge Gibson, director of the wildlife rehabilitation center located just southeast of Antigo, said. “All of our patients are protected species and several are threatened or endangered species.”
<snip>

“Northern Wisconsin is a very important part of our nation's breeding grounds for very sensitive neo-tropical bird species,” Gibson said. “People call almost apologetically when they find a tiny bird orphaned or in trouble. Many think we care for only large species, but nothing could be further from the truth. That tiny nestling found in the woods could be an endangered species.”

One example is a stunning Pileated Woodpecker currently being treated for a broken wing. Her nest tree came down and she stayed with her chicks, which were killed.
<snip>

With a staff of just three people, and relying entirely on donations, Gibson said the center is in desperate need of volunteers to fix damage at its own buildings, build new holding facilities, and transport birds from other areas.
<snip
~~~~~

Is there anyone from Wisconsin who can help?


Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #13 on: August 26, 2011, 12:27:36 AM »
There is so much need in so many places.  Thank you for reminding us abut REGI, NancyM!   :eclove
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Offline emc

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Re: REGI (The Raptor Education Group)
« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2011, 12:14:15 PM »
Oh wow, I can't imagine them functioning with a staff of  just 3 people :ecsad . Can you say overworked and stressed?  :eceek :mconfused

What a great momma pileated woodpecker! I am so glad she is being helped. Hope she can be healed and released.  :biggrin6
beth
from California