Author Topic: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)  (Read 97402 times)

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Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #90 on: March 02, 2011, 10:49:14 AM »
The hospital received 35 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 253.

Many mammals are looking for denning sites now that spring is almost here. Nocturnal mammals such as raccoons, skunks and opossums are looking for places that are dark and quiet during the day--attics, crawl spaces and under decks. Make sure your crawl space and attic vents are secure to prevent wildlife families in your home.
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #91 on: March 08, 2011, 07:46:02 PM »
Lindsay hospital received 45 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 295.

Four of the patients were house finches suffering from mycoplasma infections. This eye disease affects house finches, goldfinches and other songbirds and can be spread at bird feeders. It's really important to clean and sanitize your bird feeder at least once a week to keep birds healthy.

Jean, California

Offline emc

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #92 on: March 08, 2011, 08:14:35 PM »
I'd love to see a picture of the fox squirrels. :)
beth
from California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #93 on: March 22, 2011, 05:14:47 PM »
I won't have any pictures to post of Fox Squirrels at Lindsay --  when they are brought to the hospital, a call is made to the Squirrel Team, and out they go the same day!

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Lindsay hospital received 62 animals last week, bringing the total to 404 for this year.

Ten of the patients were baby opossums that were found still attached to the nipples of their dead mother. The whole lot was brought to the hospital where the staff carefully removed the babies. Nine of the babies have survived so far. If you find a dead opossum, check to see if there are babies in the pouch. Don't try to remove the babies yourself, but bring the mother, with offspring still attached, to the nearest wildlife hospital.

Here is what a baby Opossum looks like (not a Lindsay hospital picture)


Jean, California

Offline emc

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #94 on: March 22, 2011, 10:43:01 PM »
The baby opossum is cute.  :biggrin6
beth
from California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #95 on: June 17, 2011, 08:29:38 PM »





Owl rescued from Suisun Bay's 'ghost fleet'

By Elisabeth Nardi /Contra Costa Times June 17, 2011

Quote
It turns out that the Mothball Fleet, a collection of abandoned warships in Suisun Bay, is host to an unexpected aviary.

Sandy Plate, a volunteer with the Lindsay Wildlife Museum in Walnut Creek, recently boarded a rusted-out oiler to save a barn owl. Aboard the vessels, she witnessed nests of other birds who made their home on the ships -- purportedly raccoons and even an opossum have been found in the "ghost fleet…."

The bird had taken flight from a large hole on the ship where it was living in when it landed on an osprey's nest. The osprey had cornered the owl and was preparing to attack it when crews at the Mothball Fleet found the owl.

Plate took a small boat out to the large ship and climbed aboard to find the owl hiding above a cabinet. She was able to grab the owl, which was not hurt but was a fledgling that had not yet mastered flying. It could have drowned if it had landed on the water, she said. The barn owl is likely male, though wildlife experts are not completely sure…

The bird, now at the museum's wildlife hospital in Walnut Creek, was treated for insects in its ears, said Polly Gusa, Lindsay's barn owl species manager. At the hospital, the owl receives medication and eats about six mice a day…

On Wednesday, workers brought the 11-week white-faced owl with deep-set eyes out of its carrier to record its weight, which is about 400 grams. The owl made a hissing, screaming sound as though someone was strangling a cat. Gusa said it was being defensive.

With gloved hands, technicians stuck a tube attached to a syringe deep into the owl's throat to hydrate it.

Within the next few days, museum officials will check on the owl's progress by freeing live rodents in front of him and seeing whether it still has its predatory nature to scoop up prey. The owl likely will be released in Benicia, near where he was rescued, within a few weeks….

The museum usually sees about 150 barns owls a year, said Susan Heckly, wildlife rehabilitation director. A couple of barn owls also are on display at the museum.

In the central United States, barn owls are becoming endangered, as there are fewer barns for them to live in, Heckly said. In California, they thrive mainly because they have adapted to living in palm trees --and apparently boats in Suisun Bay, she added.

link to full article




Jean, California

Offline PamNY

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #96 on: June 21, 2011, 11:32:00 AM »
These are such fascinating stories. Thanks for posting and for the work you do.

Offline emc

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #97 on: June 22, 2011, 12:31:20 PM »
such a gorgeous bird. so glad it is being cared for. Do they feel a need to rescue any of the other animals on that ship?
beth
from California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #98 on: June 28, 2011, 11:27:26 PM »
I don't think they found any other animals on the ship.

From Lindsay's Hot Sheet:

The hospital received 235 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 2869.

One of the patients was a fledgling raven brought to us because it had become tangled in plastic twine that the parents used to build their nest. The raven was found when biologists noticed that the siblings had all left the nest, but this one was still there in distress. Please pick up and properly destroy anything that might entangle wildlife. String, fishing line, plastic material and things with loops like six-pack rings can all be dangerous for wildlife.

In a few days I will post some good news that concerns Lindsay Wildlife Museum and Cascades Raptor Center.
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #99 on: July 12, 2011, 10:34:36 PM »
The hospital received 224 animals last week, bringing the total to 3325 for this year.

Five of the patients were young white-throated swifts. Swifts spend most of their day aloft, feeding on insects in midair. They commonly nest in cliff crevasses, and under overpasses and other structures in our area. If they land on the ground, they are unable to take off because their wings are long and their legs are short. If they leave their nests before they can fly well, they are likely to end up grounded and unable to get off the ground.


White-throated Swift (not a Lindsay photo)
Jean, California

Offline emc

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #100 on: July 12, 2011, 10:45:00 PM »
224 in one week seems like a lot!  Is it the time of the year, that the numbers are high?
beth
from California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #101 on: July 12, 2011, 11:31:22 PM »
Wildlife hospitals are very busy from April through September.  Baby animal season.  Many baby birds.
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #102 on: July 23, 2011, 04:52:21 PM »
On Thursday, I worked in the outside aviaries (flight aviaries).  One of the aviaries had a dozen young Scrub Jays who were learning how to fly.  Some were still being hand fed with a syringe.  If they cam to me on one of the branches, fluffed their feathers, and begged, I would feed them.  Jays are easy.  They know when they have had enough and they stop gaping.  They were so excited about the food!  I had them on my head, my shoulders, my arms.  However, I did not feed them unless they were on the branch closest to me.  I didn't want them to fly to land on humans after they were released.

The next thing to do was clean up the aviary, which means replacing the sheets on the floor and providing fresh bowls of food and water.  When I came back into the aviary without the feeding cup and syringe, I got a different reception.  They flew away from me.

Ok, so I did a double shift and fed them again around 5 PM.  I walked in with the syringe and feeding cup and got the friendly reception. 

One of the other aviaries I worked in was the one with our Raven.  As I may have said earlier, he doesn't see well, so he cannot be released back into the wild.  He was brought to us as a fledgling, so he knows he's a Raven.  He's smart and feisty and I am privileged to have been trained to work with him.  Thursday he took a bath and then flapped his wings like mad and gave me a shower.  I am pretty sure he was laughing when he did this.   :eclove
Jean, California

Offline Rajame

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #103 on: July 23, 2011, 06:22:38 PM »
Great story! Those ravens and very smart - or should we say smart-alecks?! :hearts 2
Your soul lights up the room as if the sun is beaming directly.

Offline luvthebirds

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #104 on: July 23, 2011, 06:24:47 PM »
Thanks for the post, Beans.  It is wonderful that you are helping so many birds in need.  :heart
Nurture yourself with Nature - luvthebirds
(and don't forget to screep for what you need)