Author Topic: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)  (Read 94207 times)

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Offline Cawatcher

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #30 on: July 09, 2010, 05:21:28 PM »
 :eclove What a lovely ending for the coyote!! Thank you for what you do!

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #31 on: July 09, 2010, 07:01:24 PM »
The sooner we can release hospital patients, the better!  (providing they are fully recovered)

It's very stressful for wildlife to be in captivity. Causes of stress are abnormal light cycles, noise, repetitive handling, caging, diet, environment (humidity and temperature).
Jean, California

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #32 on: July 09, 2010, 08:53:43 PM »
The sooner we can release hospital patients, the better!  (providing they are fully recovered)

It's very stressful for wildlife to be in captivity. Causes of stress are abnormal light cycles, noise, repetitive handling, caging, diet, environment (humidity and temperature).

Beans, that looks like it's the same stressful environment for eagles and other wildlife as it is for humans undergoing a stay in a hospital.  Your care and support for their needs makes such a big difference.   :eclove
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #33 on: July 10, 2010, 04:49:13 PM »
A quote from The Outermost House by Henry Beston:

"We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals. Remote from universal nature, and living by complicated artifice, man in civilization surveys the creature through the glass of his knowledge and sees thereby a feather magnified and the whole image in distortion.

We patronize them for their incompleteness, for their tragic fate of having taken form so far below ourselves. And therein we err, and greatly err. For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear.

They are not brethren, they are not underlings; they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth."


I framed this quote, along with a sketch of a California Brown Pelican, and took it to International Bird Rescue Research Center.  I am making a second copy for Lindsay Wildlife.


Jean, California

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #34 on: July 10, 2010, 10:24:25 PM »
A lovely gift, Beans.  They will be so pleased to have them!    :eclove
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline emc

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #35 on: July 29, 2010, 08:49:57 AM »
I'm enjoying catching up on this topic and re-reading from the beginning.  On page 1 you give instructions for cleaning bird feeders weekly.  You next mention cleaning hummingbird feeders twice a week.  Are the recomendations for cleaning them, the same?

Also , if you know, or can find out how I can clean the bird bath.  I have it in a clearing, near a small tree but still it's in the sun.   ( safer from neighborhood cats ) There is a growth of reddish stuff, which I can't remove completely, and of course grows back quickly.  Bird bath is cement type.  The birds and I would appreciate knowing how to properly clean and maintain it.
Thanks  :ecsmile
beth
from California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #36 on: July 29, 2010, 09:34:51 AM »
Here is a good site about cleaning bird feeders. 

CLICK

Here's another site that describes how to clean a bird bath.

CLICK

Bird feeders can spread diseases, such as avian pox.  It's really important to keep feeders clean.  And bird baths, too.

I have several feeders.  When I take one down to clean, I have a fresh, clean one to put up.  I stopped using hummingbird feeders because I have plants that bloom year round for the hummers. 
Jean, California

Offline emc

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #37 on: July 29, 2010, 11:01:12 AM »
Thanks beans I'll look those references up.  I have year round plants for hummers too, but they still like to supplement with the feeders. I have hooded orioles come also
.  They nest in some palm trees across the street :)
beth
from California

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #38 on: July 29, 2010, 03:44:03 PM »
Beans and Emc, I'm curious about the plants you have year-around for the hummers.  Would you please tell us what they are?  I know that varies by location/climate, but it's interesting to find out about what other folks find what works for where they live,

One of the best bushes I've seen, that was like a cafeteria for hummers, was a form of salvia with lots of red-pink flowers.  It was in the Santa Cruz Mountains, south of the San Francisco Bay Area.
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #39 on: July 29, 2010, 05:28:07 PM »
I have several varieties of salvia, most with red flowers.
Jean, California

Offline emc

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #40 on: July 29, 2010, 05:54:15 PM »
Hmm I have a  big bottle brush, a tall purple kind of salvia, red and lavender trumpet vines, and a flowering bush with pink blossoms, that I don't know it's name.  Also a hibiscus that I know they perch in and get insects from, not sure if they use it's nectar tho.  These are the ones I know they use.
beth
from California

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #41 on: July 29, 2010, 06:31:09 PM »
Beans and Emc, your gardens must be very nice for hummers and other wildlife! Please take pictures when you have blooming shrubs and bushes.  I have bottle brush, bougainvillea (that blooms its head off), pyracantha and most of the rest are green shrubs and trees.   The hummers seem to like the bottle brush.  I did have nine rose bushes, but can't really garden now.

We planted a navel orange years ago and it has the best, golden-color oranges that anyone has ever had.  The bees like the blossoms and they like the blue blossoms on the rosemary, too.   :eclove

There used to be more hummingbirds around.  Several times they've built nests that were low enough to see the babies.   :giggle

Several people in the chat room have mentioned that they have let parts of their property return to a natural state for the sake of wildlife.   :nod2

It would be fun to visit Doug and Sheila's garden, and also Booni's. :heart
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline emc

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #42 on: July 29, 2010, 07:24:05 PM »
There are several birds that love the pyracantha berries. Robins, mockingbirds, and maybe cedar waxwings.
beth
from California

Offline passerine

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #43 on: July 29, 2010, 07:58:30 PM »
Here, the Pacific NW the hummers go for the wild red currant bush, one of the earliest bloomers for their arrival, here they need the help of feeders especially when they arrive. There are only a couple stragglers left now :sad, their the loving the bee balm.

Mountain Ash & elderberry trees are favorite here for robins, waxwings, flickers.

Offline emc

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #44 on: July 30, 2010, 05:51:56 PM »
Beans: thanks for the suggestions and links for birdbaths and feeders.  I never thought of having 2 seed feeders, so 1 can dry and have another to put out. Duh?
I have always power washed the bird bath every day or every other day.  I have tried vinegar, and I've tried bleach solution.  Perhaps I didn't let the bleach work long enough before.  I let it sit for 20 min, much improved , but still a couple spots of live "whatevers".  I added the pennies after and will do it all again in a week to see if I can get the rest.
beth
from California