Author Topic: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)  (Read 92403 times)

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Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2010, 11:44:42 AM »
The constant hum of the machines kept me awake during those long days.  I shouted for my captors to release me but their mad rantings were unintelligible.  The worst part was the waiting.  Even now, the memory of those enormous hands clamping down on my throat and prying my mouth open makes m blood turn to ice.  If only I had never hit that window and met that orange tabby....

Excerpted from Memoirs of a House Finch

The training progresses, and yesterday we discussed the philosophy of handling.  Our goal is to reduce the stress of the animals we care for as much as possible with proper handling techniques.  Many of the animals are injured, unstable and easily stressed.  Unnecessary physical exertion can tip the balance toward delayed healing or even death.
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2010, 11:48:00 AM »
Much was said in this very special topic.  One thing stands out in my mind:  Keep an eye on how the animal is behaving.  Is he calm, bouncing around or near comatose?  Watch what he does as you approach.  Tr to anticipate his actions.  Knowing the general personalities of a species can help, but noting the actual personality of one's patient is even more valuable.
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2010, 12:07:55 PM »
I was glad to learn Lindsay also uses the metric system for weights and measures, as IBRRC does.  I know what 20 grams feels like (small duckling) and what 50 cc looks like.  Very accurate measurements and easy to remember.  

Reading the tiny markings on the 1 mL (1 cc) tuberculin (TB) syringe is a challenge for me, but with great concentration and good light I can do it.  These syringes are calibrated in hundredths.  Originally designed for the small dosages required for tuberculin skin testing, they are also widely used in a variety of sensitivity and allergy tests for people.  We use them at IBRRC for oral medication.


TB syringe
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2010, 12:37:43 PM »
We also discussed basic bird and mammal anatomy.  (I was glad to have the Manual of Ornithology and Handbook of Bird Biology at home.  I've gone through the entire manual but haven't finished the handbook.  Very good information here and a good reference.)

Here are some basics:

EXTERNAL COVERING

Birds:
skin (dry, inelastic, thin, loosely attached)
feathers
     no growth once fully formed
     purpose:  flight, insulation, display, nesting
     different types

Mammals:
skin and fur

SKELETAL SYSTEM

Birds:
bird bones are hollow (pneumatic bones)
breast muscles = 20% of body weight
some bones fused together, i.e., chest bones

Mammals:
denser bones, but baby animals have fragile bones
bones not fused; attached to each other with ligaments

RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

Birds:
No diaphragm
Have a more efficient respiratory system
air sac system - gas flows through lungs during inspiration and expiration
danger of suffocation - can suffocate if held too tightly

Mammals:
Have diaphragm

EXCRETION
Birds:
urine and feces combined before exiting
the ureters "milk" the semisolid urine down to the cloaca where it mixes with the feces
dangerous if vent (exit below cloaca) becomes clogged

Mammals:
urine and feces separate
dangerous if anus or opening of the urethra becomes clogged

Note:  only one bird excretes urine separately from feces.  Does anyone know which bird that is?
Jean, California

Offline madrona

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2010, 02:01:56 PM »
Ask ostrich?  Bet he knows!   :eclol
   Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to
      rather than what we are separate from. - Terry Tempest Williams

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2010, 02:26:19 PM »
Yes, he should know 'cause it's an ostrich--  :ecwink
Jean, California

Offline Cawatcher

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2010, 06:36:33 PM »
Congratulations bean You will have a great time ( I am Jealous) lol

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #22 on: May 05, 2010, 03:26:49 PM »
This story is loosely connected to Lindsay in that the Executive Director commented on it in the news.  It is a sad story, but it is one we need to know about, if only to prevent its happening again --- in Oakland or in other cities--

This morning I read about a young deer (about one year old) who was shot by an Oakland police officer.

The incident began when two Oakland Housing Authority officers spotted the deer running on the 8700 block of Birch Street about 10:30 a.m., said housing authority spokesman Marcus Walton. The officers saw the deer running into the carport on 90th Avenue behind a home belonging to Kim McElmore. The animal then jumped a fence and ended up in Brian Campbell's backyard.

The housing authority officers notified Oakland animal control and the state Department of Fish and Game, Walton said.

But sources said that before a state game warden could arrive, Oakland police Sgt. Terrance West ordered another officer to kill the deer. The officer, whose name was not released, fired several shots, but the deer did not die immediately, so he fired several more shots, Weems said. A total of six or seven shots were fired but it was not known how many hit the deer...


According to a witness, the deer posed no threat to people.  It was simply standing in the corner of the yard, shaking.

You can read the story here:  Outrage over Deer Shot by Oakland Officer

I have sent a letter to the SF Chronicle and Oakland City Council and Oakland Police.

The video is on YT, and seeing it after reading the story made me angrier and sadder.  I'm sending a link to the story and video to friends who live in Oakland.  I know they will write letters and make calls.  We must be sure this doesn't happen again.  There's more crime in Oakland than the cops can handle, so why did they get involved?  The deer was simply in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Susan Heckly, wildlife rehabilitation director at the Lindsay Wildlife Museum in Walnut Creek, said Tuesday that she saw the video but didn't know the circumstances that led to the decision to shoot the deer.

Nevertheless, "from my vantage point, I would say that is not Plan A - that was probably a bad decision," Heckly said. "I don't know the police force's level of knowledge about wildlife or animals and how they train their officers."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEEYnriDfNQ
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #23 on: May 27, 2010, 09:11:46 PM »
Thursdays I work at Lindsay Wildlife Museum's Hospital.  I fed many baby birds today, including two crows (fledglings).  There is quite a range of wildlife here, probably everything but marine mammals and big game.  I watched a small gopher snake get his meds, via injection under the skin.  (Baytril Antibacterial Injectible Solution)


baby gopher snake
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #24 on: May 27, 2010, 09:11:49 PM »
The opportunity to work with a wide range of wildlife is appreciated!  I saw a baby Opossum in his cage.  He was all curled up in his little hammock, which is a piece of cloth tied to the sides of his cage at four places.  A woman from the Opossum Team took him home.  There are many teams here that do home care.  The ones I know about are the following:

Dove Team, Squirrel Team, Opossum Team, Hummingbird Team, Raccoon Team, Bat Team.  These animals do much better in a quiet home environment than in a busy hospital.

So there are many animals checked in that I never see.  The animal comes in, is checked by the vet, a home team member is called, and the animal is picked up that day.  Each home care animal has the same records, meds, food, etc. as he would have in the hospital. 
Jean, California

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #25 on: May 28, 2010, 02:05:53 AM »
Beans, the classes you're taking and the information that you're sharing with us here is soooooo interesting!  Thank you for taking the time to tell about it.  :clap

More, more, more, please.  :eclove
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #26 on: July 03, 2010, 07:28:28 PM »


A few weeks ago, a young coyote was found stuck in a canal in Antioch. He was only about three and a half months old and was separated from his family. Contra Costa Animal Services rescued the young coyote and then brought him to the Lindsay Museum wildlife hospital.

The initial exam showed that the coyote was mildly dehydrated, had ticks in each of his ears, but was otherwise in good shape. Staff gave him fluids for the dehydration, removed the ticks and cleaned his ears.

The next morning, the coyote had eaten all the mice and rats that staff had placed in his kennel and he was deemed a fit candidate to reunite with his family. Staff connected with the coyote's original finder who located the area where he had seen the adult female coyote.
 
The young coyote was placed by a nearby tree, and soon he jumped up and started running. A few minutes later, staff saw him duck down into a den. He was safely home.
Jean, California

Offline luvthebirds

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #27 on: July 03, 2010, 10:40:03 PM »
 :biggrin6
Nurture yourself with Nature - luvthebirds
(and don't forget to screep for what you need)

Offline beans

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #28 on: July 09, 2010, 04:57:45 PM »

Male Brewer's Blackbird

Yesterday at Lindsay I set up an incubator for an adult Brewer's Blackbird.  To date, most of my contact with songbirds has been feeding the babies.  While I cleaned and disinfected the incubator, he waited not-so-patiently in his small brown paper bag.  He had just been examined and weighed, and now he was to return to his cleaned incubator with fresh food and water in new dishes.

Songbirds are so different from the large pelagic birds I'm used to, such as grebes, gulls, loons, ducks, pelicans, etc.  As I was taking him out of the bag and putting him into the incubator, he got away!  I'm told this happens.  In fact, this issue was covered during training.  One turns out the lights in the room.  He was captured (he wasn't flying well and was hiding in a corner).  The interns grinned while my face went red.  Songbirds are so small and fragile I'm almost afraid to handle them.

An injured Scrub Jay was admitted while I was in the Treatment Room.  After a quick body exam, his mouth was swabbed with a long Q-tip that had been moistened with a saline solution.  Then the examiner touched the Q-tip to a slide and took it to the microscope.  What she was looking for is trichomoniasis.  All birds admitted to the hospital are screened for trichomoniasis.  New treatments have eliminated epidemics within the hospital.  (Trich wasn't found in this bird.)  To read more, click here

Lindsay presents the opportunity to work with a variety of wildlife, and I'm finding a like every animal I see.  I feel like I'm starting over, and in a way I am.
Jean, California

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #29 on: July 09, 2010, 05:18:50 PM »
Very interesting and challenging work, Beans.  They are fortunate to have you there to work with the birds and animals.  I'm so glad that the Blackbird and the young coyote are doing well.   :ecsmile
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir