Author Topic: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)  (Read 94204 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline beans

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,100
Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
« on: January 16, 2010, 01:43:15 PM »


Lindsay Wildlife Museum

This morning I took my first class at Lindsay Wildlife Museum.  Lindsay has a wildlife hospital, where they accept birds, mammals, reptiles, etc.   I have transferred birds from IBRRC to Lindsay and have also picked up aquatic birds from Lindsay to bring to IBRRC for rehabilitation.

The volunteer shifts are only three hours, and volunteers sign up for one shift a week.  The shifts at IBRRC are four hours, but I usually work six or seven hours.  My longest shift was eleven hours.

I've signed up for the Wildlife Hospital Core Curriculum series taught on Saturdays fro 9 - 1.   There are four classes.  The series is also offered on Tuesday evenings.

My first class will probably be February 13, and I'll describe them here.  
« Last Edit: July 18, 2012, 10:07:53 AM by NancyM »
Jean, California

Offline beans

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,100
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2010, 01:52:45 PM »
Lindsay is very different from IBRRC.  Lindsay has a museum, education birds, and activities for the public. 

IBRRC is strictly a hospital with no public activities. 

Neither Lindsay nor IBRRC allow the public inside the hospital.  Both have a reception area where the public can bring injured or sick wildlife.

Why not let the public see the hospital?  Wildlife is terrified of humans!  Humans, with their eyes on the front of their faces, are perceived as predators!  Even the human voice is feared by wildlife.  Talking around wildlife can cause

* heart rate to spike
* depress the immune system
* slow down recovery

Unlike domestic pets, wildlife cannot be cuddled or soothed by humans.
Jean, California

Offline beans

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,100
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2010, 02:08:01 PM »
Like IBRRC, Lindsay's busy season begins in spring.  Many orphaned or abandoned baby animals will be brought to both hospitals. 

Parents can do a far better job of raising their babies than we can, with all of our training and veterinary assistance.  So when one sees an "abandoned" baby, one should leave and give the mother a chance to retrieve her little one.  A mother doe, for example, hides her fawn(s) while she goes off to explore and eat.  A mother duck is probably hiding close by while her babies seem to be on their own.  Neither mother will come back as long as a human is hanging around. 
Jean, California

Offline beans

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,100
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2010, 02:11:24 PM »
Here's a story I found on the Lindsay website --



In June 2009, the wildlife hospital received a yellow-bellied marmot, one of the largest and most unusual rodents ever received in the hospital. It was an immature female that made the journey from near Pinecrest in the engine compartment of a Dodge Ram pickup truck. The truck had been parked at the Crabtree trailhead at the entrance to the Emigrant Wilderness and the marmot must have thought she had found a good place to hide. We occasionally receive rodents such as deer mice and chipmunks from remote areas of California, but the marmot was by far the largest.



The marmot had abrasions on her chin and a partially skinned toe. She also had fleas, which is common in wildlife. She was anesthetized to clean her wounds and administer fluids and vitamins subcutaneously. She was powdered and given an injection for fleas. After recovery she was placed in a stainless steel cage heated by a large heating pad and was given food and water.



She didn’t eat much the first night—just a little kale and parsley—so the second day she was syringe-fed mixed vegetable baby food, which she ate well. She was quite BAR (bright, alert and responsive) and managed to escape her cage several times while in the hospital. She was offered a different variety of food the second night but still didn’t eat much more than a few flowers. On the third day an examination showed her wounds were healing well and it was decided she should be released back in her home territory as soon as possible. A volunteer who has a cabin in the area where the marmot came from returned to the trailhead and released the wayward marmot back to her home.


Jean, California

Offline BBE

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5,968
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2010, 04:50:33 PM »
beans, that is so cool. And you will be taking the course - that is great. So will you still volunteer at the current centre and at Lindsay too?
Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. (Anonymous)
Avatar is of Karula (female leopard). May 1, 2013

Offline beans

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,100
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2010, 05:11:15 PM »
I'll volunteer at both places--
Jean, California

Offline Tigerlady105

  • HEGPS
  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11,828
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2010, 05:41:31 PM »
Beans, this is so interesting.  I'm looking forward to more...thank you for sharing this with us.   :ecsmile
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline luvthebirds

  • HEGPS
  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,892
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2010, 07:11:02 PM »
Beans, thanks for the information.  I hope that you will enjoy your classes.  About 20 years ago I took the docent training at Lindsay which also entailed taking a biology (mammals as a recall) class and lab at DVC.  Unfortunately, things changed and although I completed the training, could not spend the time volunteering.  I did enjoy the training and getting to learn about animals.  I am glad the museum is still there and I am sure they will be very lucky to have you!  Good luck and keep us posted.  :ecsmile
Nurture yourself with Nature - luvthebirds
(and don't forget to screep for what you need)

Offline beans

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,100
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2010, 11:26:10 AM »
Lindsay does not band the birds that it rehabilitates and releases.  The reason is that they don't have a permit to do so.  The US Fish and Wildlife Service has very strict rules for banding. 

For example, last week IBRRC had a small goose to release.  She looked like a mini version of a Canada Goose.  We thought she was a Cackling Goose, which was long considered just a small race of the Canada Goose. The smallest four of the eleven recognized races were recently determined to be distinct enough to be their own species. Cackling Goose includes the races known as Taverner's, Richardson's, Aleutian, and Cackling geese.  So we couldn't band her until she was correctly identified.  Was she an Aleutian or a Cackling Goose?  Our manager would have to check the database first.  What made us question the race is that the band assigned to a Cackling Goose wasn't quite large enough.  Ohmy, she was beautiful!  And she came in so thin two weeks again.  During her stay with us, she had gained roughly 2,000 grams!  She was strong, fully flighted, and her blood values looked good.  As I write this, I am thinking of her in the wild, for she was probably banded and released the next day.
Jean, California

Offline beans

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,100
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2010, 11:34:29 AM »
Lindsay has a number of "ambassador" or "education" animals.  Among them are several birds who have only one wing.  The ones I remember are the Turkey Vulture and the Bald Eagle.  The new rule* is that wildlife facilities can't keep one-winged birds.   One-winged birds need extra special care to exercise them properly, keep them from being bored, and to keep them healthy.  Many facilities don't have the expertise or the staff to do this.  These birds must be euthanized. The one-wings Lindsay now has have been grandfathered in and won't be "put to sleep."

I have mixed feelings about education animals at wildlife facilities.  This is not a natural life for them, even though they live much longer than the same species in the wild.  I wonder whether they long for the life they once had?  

On the other hand, they do teach the general public about wildlife and wildlife habitats.  And this may save the lives of animals in the wild.

Lindsay keeps only those animals which cannot survive in the wild.  For example, there is a beautiful Great Horned Owl who was illegally raised by a member of the public.  He is completely habituated to people, and was found in a park, begging people for food.  He'd walk or fly right up to them.  Or land on their heads!  And there are at least two raptors who are missing an eye.  They can't properly hunt for their food.

*This rule comes from US Fish and Wildlife Service and/or California Fish and Game.  Like IBRRC, Lindsay works under both permits.
Jean, California

Offline luvthebirds

  • HEGPS
  • Member
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,892
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2010, 11:55:56 AM »
Beans, Is "King Richard" the turkey vulture by any chance still living?  He was a very special ambassador at the Lindsey some time ago and very special to me as I once got to hold him.  :eclove
Nurture yourself with Nature - luvthebirds
(and don't forget to screep for what you need)

Offline passerine

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4,376
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2010, 12:24:43 PM »
Like IBRRC, Lindsay's busy season begins in spring.  Many orphaned or abandoned baby animals will be brought to both hospitals. 

Parents can do a far better job of raising their babies than we can, with all of our training and veterinary assistance.  So when one sees an "abandoned" baby, one should leave and give the mother a chance to retrieve her little one.  A mother doe, for example, hides her fawn(s) while she goes off to explore and eat.  A mother duck is probably hiding close by while her babies seem to be on their own.  Neither mother will come back as long as a human is hanging around. 
This very good advice every Spring people thinking they're helping bring many young animals to rehab facilities it doesn't usually end well because as you say no one can replace the mother & if they don't have a place to return them & hope the mother is still near, if not it's a death sentence for many.   :eccry

Alway enjoy your posts beans.  :ecsmile

Offline beans

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,100
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2010, 12:39:09 PM »
Luv, I believe there are two Turkey Vultures, but I don't know their names.  One has been there for 30 years?  I'm remembering all of this off the top of my head, so to speak, as I didn't take any notes on the tour.  I've been there many times, once with grandsons and family years ago, and more recently, simply to drop off and pick up birds at the hospital.
Jean, California

Offline beans

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3,100
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2010, 12:15:55 PM »
I have started training at Lindsay Wildlife Museum (has an excellent wildlife hospital) so I could learn more about songbirds and other wildlife.

The Core Curriculum covers the following:

1.   Health and safety
2.   Policies, releasing animals
3.   Basic bird and mammal anatomy
4.   Charting and metrics
5.   Baby mammal care
6.   Baby bird care
7.   Expectations, slide show, how to get started
8.   Exam, paperwork, sign-up

Also, there was an Introduction class a few weeks ago.  The class cost $100, with $35 going to one year of membership at the Lindsay Wildlife Museum.  Each volunteer must be a member.

The training classes are taught every other Saturday, from 9 AM to 1 PM.   

The first day of training we were taught, among other things, how to take care of bird feeders. They should be emptied and washed once a week and then disinfected for 20 minutes in a 5% chlorine solution, rinsed, and allowed to air dry. The reason for this is that birds can carry diseases, and avian pox is insidious. A bird with avian pox which pokes its bill in the feeder can contaminate it. The next bird that comes along has a good chance of picking it up. Also, sick birds can spend more time at bird feeders, as they may be too ill or impaired to find their food in the wild. Hummingbird feeders should be cleaned twice a week. Never use the nectar sold in stores that contains red dye or preservatives.

I'll be volunteering at Lindsay and at IBRRC.  Lindsay has all wildlife, except marine mammals.  So much new information for me!

I also took a two hour seminar (on the web - it's a webinar) from the Oiled wildlife Care Network.  And I passed the exam, also on the net.  Both Lindsay & IBRRC, among others, are members of OWCN. http://www.owcn.org/

The more I learn, the more convinced I am that I know so little.
Jean, California

Offline passerine

  • HEG
  • Friend of HEGPS
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4,376
Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2010, 08:39:51 PM »
Good for you beans, i'm envious i'm unable to join you...would love to do what you're doing. No facilities any where near me :sad but very happy for you & will live precariously through your experiences, thanks for sharing. :biggrin6