Author Topic: Wildlife in the News  (Read 70870 times)

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Offline beans

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Re: Wildlife in the News (not rehab)
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2010, 09:31:19 PM »
Puffins’ winter odyssey revealed



Puffins from the North Sea's largest breeding colony venture much further afield during the winter than previously thought, a study has shown.

More than 75% of the seabirds fitted with "geolocator" tags headed for the open waters of the Atlantic Ocean, rather than staying in the North Sea. Until now, very little was known about where puffins went during the winter as the birds spent the entire time at sea.

The findings by British researchers appear in the journal Marine Biology.
To read the article from the BBC, click here

Jean, California

Offline birdvoyer

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Re: Wildlife in the News (not rehab)
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2010, 12:04:33 AM »
My Father, knowing that I am an eagleholic, forwarded an email that was in his IEEE newsletter or some such publication that he receives. In any case, I know that there have been discussions a few times in the Hornby chat about this lady and thought that some might be interested. I am afraid that many concerns about her practices will now be realized and how this will be so unfortunate for the eagles. I hope that the eagles will find their way and survive without her.

My condolences to the family and friends for the loss of this well meaning soul.



Quote
HOMER -- Jean Keene, the 85-year-old "Eagle Lady" whose feeding
program drew hundreds of bald eagles and scores of nature
photographers to the Homer Spit each winter, died Tuesday evening in
her Spit home.

Keene had been unwell but continued to feed fish scraps to the eagles
this winter. In 2006, the city banned feeding of eagles, but allowed
Keene to continue feeding until 2010. She had been at it for 30 years.

Keene's sudden passing leaves the city in an awkward fix. With
several hundred eagles currently loitering on the Spit, a sudden halt
to feeding could bring starvation or an invasion into local back
yards, federal biologists say. It's probably too late in winter for
them to go elsewhere.

"Some of the younger birds would probably not make it," said Vernon
Byrd, a Homer-based biologist with the Alaska Maritime National
Wildlife Refuge. "They'd have to forage around, start to get into
more garbage and boats looking for food. People would come on the
weak ones standing around."

City officials said Wednesday that an assistant who has been helping
Keene with feeding will be allowed to keep going with existing food
supplies, good for seven to 10 days.

The city council would then have to change the law to allow feeding
to continue without Keene, at least until spring, when the Eagle Lady
customarily shut down her operation and the birds dispersed to resume
natural feeding.

Keene started feeding eagles in the late 1970s and became a fixture
of Homer life. Her death flashed quickly around the Internet on
photography sites.

"I don't think folks in town really realized what a celebrity she
was," said Dick Ginkowski, a Wisconsin photographer who said he'd
been to Homer 10 times.

"We're all just shocked at her passing. She was such an integral part
of the Land's End community," said Dawn Schneider, general manager of
Land's End Resort at the end of Homer Spit.

The resort's restaurant has a booth with a plaque where Keene held
court regularly with visitors from around the world, Schneider said.
On Wednesday, flowers were turning the booth into a shrine.

Keene was born in 1923 and raised on a Minnesota dairy farm. She
started out as a rodeo stunt rider, using her long red hair to
dramatic effect as she dismounted and mounted a galloping white horse
whose mane and tail were dyed the same color. Her rodeo career ended
in injury when a trick went wrong.

She moved to Alaska in 1977, finding work with Icicle Seafoods on the
Spit, which became a source of cod heads and freezer-burned salmon in
her early years of feeding. She lived for years in a barely insulated
mobile home on the cold and windy Spit, alone but close by the birds she loved.

The number of eagles drawn to the Spit increased each year. Keene's
biographer, Cary Anderson, said in 2003 that she was throwing out 500
pounds of food every day. Curious onlookers would show up, too,
parking like they were at a drive-in movie theater, telephoto lenses
protruding from their windows.

"Jean never once sought publicity or attention for feeding the
eagles," Anderson said Wednesday. "She was generous to everyone who
was interested in photographing the eagles, whether she was
interviewed or not. She never asked anyone for a dime."

Criticism of the eagle-feeding efforts flared up around Homer in 2004
after photo guides and lodge owners began duplicating Keene's
program, attracting eagles for the benefit of their clients.

Critics said it was demeaning to turn the national bird into a
Dumpster diver. They said crowding eagles was unhealthy, threatened
smaller birds and pets and drew eagles away from their natural
wintering grounds. Government biologists frowned on the practice but
stopped short of calling for regulation.

Supporters called such complaints unproven and noted the practice
drew tourists to town in a quiet time of year. Photographers lavished
praise on the gritty Keene.

"Homer was exactly the right place for Jean Keene, because she was a
character," said Ginkowski. "You don't see those originals much any more."

The clash eventually drew international media attention, including
network news and Comedy Central's Daily Show.

"If you have seen stunning close-up photographs of bald eagles with
fish in their beaks in glossy magazines in the United States, Europe
or Asia," wrote the Washington Post, "chances are good that they were
shot outside Keene's trailer."

The city's eventual compromise in 2006 eliminated other feeding
efforts but allowed Keene's to continue until 2010. It was clear she
didn't have too many winters left. Lately, with heart trouble, she
needed help to throw out the food.

"It has been a difficult few months for me," said her son, Lonnie, in
a blog post to a photographers' site, "but I am happy that she left
this mortal coil at home near her beloved birds and surrounded by friends."

When she gave up her annual October trip this year to visit in
Minneapolis, her son said, the thing she hated most was not being
able to sit on his front steps and hand out Halloween candy to children.

Keene died around 7 p.m. Tuesday with several good friends in
attendance, Schneider said.

Plans for a memorial service will be settled later this week.
Information on memorial plans and leaving messages is available on
the Land's End Web site, endofthespit.com.


Offline luvthebirds

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Re: Stories in the News
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2010, 10:51:50 AM »
There are relief efforts for the animal victims in Haiti.  The ASPCA, Humane Society and others are involved.  I am posting link to ASPCA Haiti donation info: http://www.aspca.org/news/help-the-animals-of-haiti.html
Nurture yourself with Nature - luvthebirds
(and don't forget to screep for what you need)

Offline BBE

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2010, 04:28:49 PM »
On Jan. 20, 2010 'The Richmond News' carried a sad story about a bald eagle (not too far from my stomping grounds) who unfortunately due to the nature of its injury had to be euthanized.

Quote
Brave rescue, sad end

Alan Campbell, Richmond News
Published: Wednesday, January 20, 2010

It was a story of a brave rescue but a sad ending.

A man working in the area of the South Fraser River at Triangle Road had noticed a trio of bald eagles playing in the sky when one of them hit a power line and was sent crashing to the ground.

The rest of the story is at this link:

http://www2.canada.com/richmondnews/news/story.html?id=a9cbd75e-fbb7-4701-abaf-478d9556bf87&k=51436

The Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society is known to some of us as O.W.L. who helped when the Delta Eagles had untoward events.
Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. (Anonymous)
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Offline Rajame

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2010, 08:48:10 AM »
A friend sent me this video of a "hound dog" and orangutan.  I thought I would share it here.  It made me laugh and smile and cry (well, I am a sap ya know...).  Enjoy. :heart

http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/episode/unlikely-animal-friends-4317/Photos/07216_00#tab-Videos/07216_00
Your soul lights up the room as if the sun is beaming directly.

Offline luvthebirds

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2010, 10:31:13 PM »
Thought some of you might be interested in this.  It is from the Marine Mammal Center in the S. F. Bay area.  It is about the rescue of an entangled sea lion originally spotted at Pier 39. http://www.marinemammalcenter.org/learning/comm/entangledsealions.asp
Nurture yourself with Nature - luvthebirds
(and don't forget to screep for what you need)

Offline luvthebirds

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2010, 10:36:55 PM »
Raj, thanks for posting the link to the video.  That was sooooooo very cute.   :nod2
Nurture yourself with Nature - luvthebirds
(and don't forget to screep for what you need)

Offline boonibarb

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #22 on: January 30, 2010, 09:53:29 AM »
raj, that was a lovely heartwarming video to watch.
& luv, how awful for the sealion.
People need to be educated about the dangers of fishing tackle!!
wooohoooo!

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #23 on: January 31, 2010, 02:37:23 AM »
Luv, thank you for the video link!  I just spent several hours exploring many of the websites that were available and will post some of them in the ONZ Kids' Corner and Terrific Teachers Lounge.  There even is a live daytime web cam at the Farallon Islands, a place that I've wanted to learn more about for quite a while.   :nod2
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline BBE

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2010, 06:40:34 PM »
Dolphins enjoying herring feeding-frenzy in Howe Sound

By Vivian Luk, Vancouver Sun May 7, 2010 7:29 PM

VANCOUVER -- Nearly 200 Pacific white-sided dolphins have been sighted around Howe Sound during the last few weeks, a rare phenomenon according to the Vancouver Aquarium.

Lance Barrett-Lennard, the head of whale and dolphin research at the aquarium, had set off for Howe Sound with three others on Thursday to observe the creatures. Rather than jumping and flipping, Barrett-Lennard found the dolphins swimming quietly.

Read more: Dolphins enjoying herring feeding-frenzy in Howe Sound
Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. (Anonymous)
Avatar is of Karula (female leopard). May 1, 2013

Offline Rajame

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #25 on: May 07, 2010, 07:23:43 PM »
Thank you BBE. That is what we do around here after herring!  :eclol
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Offline BBE

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2010, 07:58:42 PM »
This week Vancouver has had an unusual sighting over a couple of days. A grey whale in the water in the downtown area at False Creek.

By Graeme Wood, Vancouver Sun May 7, 2010
VANCOUVER - False Creek's newest resident, a mature 12-metre grey whale, is in healthy condition and thought to be feeding on herring, according to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

The whale is believed to be the same one spotted feeding near Squamish over the last two weeks, said Paul Cottrell, the department's marine mammal co-ordinator.  

Read more:
http://www.vancouversun.com/Grey+whale+makes+rare+appearance+Vancouver+False+Creek/2990558/story.html
Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. (Anonymous)
Avatar is of Karula (female leopard). May 1, 2013

Offline Snookums

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #27 on: May 16, 2010, 01:27:36 PM »
Interesting article about a few webcams with which we are familiar.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/s_681390.html
'Twere not best that we should all think alike. It is a difference of opinion that makes horse races.  -- Mark Twain

Offline BBE

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #28 on: May 16, 2010, 02:37:51 PM »
Hello Snookums,

Thank you for the interesting link.

The writer has one piece of information incorrect

Quote
The cameras caught a new female falcon taking over the nest at the Gulf Tower.
"A falcon named Dorothy had been on that nest for 14 years and it was either killed or pushed out by other another falcon," Powers said. "(Dorothy) had already laid two eggs, this other falcon came in and laid another egg, and this was all broadcast live."

The adults at the Gulf Tower (GT) cam are Louie and Dori.  I know it is confusing, but 'Dorothy' is the female at the Cathedral of Learning nest (along with her mate 'E2').

What transpired at the GT nest was that Louie's then current mate 'Tasha' laid 2 eggs in mid March. He came home one day with Dori and after a confrontation Tasha left.   Dori proceeded to lay 3 eggs.  Tasha's two were not consistently incubated; so folks had given up hope for two hatches.

Miracle of miracles; not only did Dori's three eggs hatch, so did Tasha's two. Kate St. John's blog 'Make That Five Out of Five

Both sets of parents are now raising 5 chicks at each nest.

Our thread links here for both nests are: Gulf Tower Nest     and      Cathedral of Learning

Snookums, thanks again for sharing the article with us.  :ecsmile
Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. (Anonymous)
Avatar is of Karula (female leopard). May 1, 2013

Offline NancyM

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Re: Wildlife in the News
« Reply #29 on: May 16, 2010, 03:10:18 PM »
Interesting article about a few webcams with which we are familiar.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/s_681390.html

Nice article about Bill "Pixcontroller" Powers!