HEGPS - Our Nature Zone

Around Hornby Island => Around Hornby Island ~ 2011-2012 => Topic started by: boonibarb on November 13, 2009, 11:04:43 AM

Title: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: boonibarb on November 13, 2009, 11:04:43 AM
There are many eagle nests on Hornby Island other than the eagle cam nest. Doug has done an excellent map of the ones he knew of when he wrote his book "The Eagles of Hornby Island" published in 2008. Not all of the nests on the map were used this year, & there are some nests that are active that aren*t displayed on the map. Doug*s eagle nest map

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2777/4099308643_8dde5755ec.jpg) (http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2777/4099308643_8dde5755ec_b.jpg)

There will be a separate thread for each nest that i have observations & fotos for.

Heads up With all my fotos, if you click on them, you will get a larger version. Also, any bold blue type is a link that you can click on.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on September 24, 2010, 09:17:24 PM
I'm thinking that we could use this thread to post general observations and statistics about the nests of Hornby Island. As we learn more about the other nests of the island, we can compare these nests to each other, and we can also compare our (very partial) statistics to the (much more detailed) observations from the cam.

If there is a better place for this thread, please feel free to transplant it.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on September 25, 2010, 03:11:07 PM
The Nest Neigbourhood

First up, an attempt at clarification for the people who don't live here and who get confused between all those nests and all those eaglets.

Doug's map, at the beginning of this thread, is not up to date, but it does give you the general picture of eagle territories dotting the foreshore, with the actual nests placed at various distances from the water - just like summer cabins by the ocean. They almost all have ocean view, and they probably all have a slice of shore to call their own (I'm not sure about nest 36).

The cam nest is Nest 10. The other nests that you hear about regularly are all in the same neighbourhood. This is partly because that's our neighbourhood - Booni's, Doug and Sheila's, mine - and partly because we had some close encounters with some of those nests' eaglets this year.

So the nest neighbourhood runs like this: starting from the west, or left side on the map, you can find Nest 6-7 (two nests side by side, only one occupied); the next bit of beach is the territory of nest 9 (Niner's nest). The next territory belongs to Mom and Dad Hornby, our beloved cam eagles. Moving further east, next up is the Wiig nest. It is near the number 11 on the map. We heard the Wiiglet flying over the cam nest in August.

Next along the shore is the Brigantine nest, home of Li'l Brig and Brigadan. And next, just east of Tralee Point, is Decker's nest - we call it Nest 15, but it really is the replacement of nest 15, so to be consistent we should give it a name related to its location.

So there you have them, side by side in peaceful neighbourhood, the nests we've learned the most about. Their attached territories neatly divide the shore, just as lakeshore backyards abut each other.

So now you can start placing the neighbourhood brats that we've been talking about: the 2 strange eaglets with the orange gapes (and their funny-sounding parent) at nest 6-7...  Then Niner and his remaining sibling Ninette...  Phoenix...  Wiiglet...  Li'l Brig and her remaining sibling Brigadan, the climber of trees...  and Decker.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on September 25, 2010, 05:13:01 PM
Thank you for explaining more about the Nest Neighborhood, Wren.  It helps to be able to better understand where they are in relation to what is the current information.   :eclove
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Rajame on September 25, 2010, 05:20:25 PM
Wren,

Thank you for helping us that are challenged with understanding how the nests rest. I walked with you in the description. Does it amaze you that you, booni, Doug & Sheila are all in the same neighborhood. Coinsequence? I don't think so.

Probably Mum & Dad orchestrated this all. Afterall, they had almost 1 million views of their nest in just one year!  :nod2

Good to know.

Hugs,
Rajame  :heart
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on September 25, 2010, 06:54:26 PM
If we return to Doug's map, we see some areas with higher densities of nests, some areas with the nests evenly distributed, and some gaps.
The crowds are mostly past and present nests within one territory; the best example are nests 16, 17, 18 and 19: these all belong to the same pair, who move from time to time. A clever way to solve the problem of parasites without having to build from scratch every year!

The gaps are where I directed my searches this year, in hopes of filling in the data. I found a new nest at Shingle Spit, we learned of another new one at Phipps Point, and I'm still not sure about Nest 3. (Neighbours argue about its latest known occupancy. Visiting the area, I heard someone being territorial, but saw no other signs.)

One area that seemed vacant is the Bench, between Shingle Spit and Ford Cove. The map shows nests 33, 34 and 35, but several outings in the area revealed no sign of occupation. Nest 35 had been vacant for years and seems to have blown down in a storm; the whole area of nests 34-35 was damaged by high winds a few years ago.
What I did find along that escarpment was... a family of peregrine falcons. They are nesting on the cliff. I saw them hassling the nearest eagles, those of the Shingle Spit nest, all summer. And I'm curious to see if the eagles will return to that location. I really don't see why the 2 kinds of birds can't cohabit. Their food sources barely overlap. But the peregrines sure are aggressive.

There is another area that is blank on Doug's map. Another escarpment, as it happens. It is along the subdivision known as High Salal.
I asked a resident about it. Does he see any eagles around there?
"Oh, yes, lots of eagles all the time. And it's special because you can see them flying from above."

Nice. Any nests?
"No, no eagle nests that I know of. But we've had peregrines falcons nesting there for nine years!"

Oh really. You don't say.

Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: boonibarb on September 25, 2010, 07:16:25 PM


Lovely stuff wrennie!  :nod2
You write so well, & i am carried away by your words.
Thanks for analyzing the Nests a bit for us, & fitting them all into the bigger picture!  :hearts2
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: luvthebirds on November 10, 2010, 08:52:55 PM
Winterwren.  Is this the high salal?  I saw a few eagles fly into there early one evening (still light).  At least three.  I was on the campground side of Tribune Bay looking across, so do not have pictures.  They flew from the left as we look at this picture and into the treed area among the houses.  Guess they were passing through to Helliwell nests?  Or nestless although I thought they looked like adults, as I recall.

Ignore the funny looking Mr. Ltb in the picture.   :eclol. This picture was taken in the morning when the tide was lower than later when I saw the eagles over the ridge area.
(And Mr. Ltb's stick was in the water later.)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4117/4756628858_e3c6ff3321.jpg)
Photo copyright 2009 luvthebirds

Lol can't make copyright symbol on iPad  :puzzled2
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on November 11, 2010, 08:01:59 PM
Yes, Luvthebirds, the escarpment in your photo is indeed High Salal - the area where a neighbour reported "lots of eagles, all the time - but no nests".

So, adults without a territory? I was seeing adults and young eagles hanging out in the vacant area south of Shingle Spit also. Or else there are indeed nests hidden in there... but that is less likely on the High Salal escarpment, because there are houses all along the cliff top, so it's reasonable to think that someone would have heard the eaglets.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on November 11, 2010, 11:23:10 PM
Luv, that's quite a variation in the levels of the tides!  Thanks for posting your photo so we can see more aspects of Hornby Island!   :eclove
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on November 29, 2010, 05:17:11 PM
Ok, here it is at last! my own effort at a map of the eagle nests of Hornby Island.
This sums up last summer's observations. Booni and I were nest-hunting all summer; we used the previous map published by Doug Carrick in his book The Eagles of Hornby Island(2008), in addition to our own past knowledge, as our starting point. Other bits of information come from interviews with people who live near the nests.

Click for larger view, then click again to examine specific areas in close up.

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5047/5351112626_444df7d404_z.jpg) (http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5047/5351112626_9c7b311694_o.jpg)
This is a real estate map that was graciously donated by Donna Tuele. I have added information relevant to our eagles.

The blue pins show the nests that were occupied last summer. The number on top of each pin indicates the number of eaglets in that nest. Fatalities are circled in red. The eaglets sent to rehab are not indicated on this map right now. There were three.

The transparent pins show nests that were unoccupied last summer, or old nest sites. I have not indicated all of those, only the ones I know well enough to pin-point them on the map.

For the sake of continuity, the nest numbers correspond to the numbers on Doug's map. We have named the newer nests, using names of nearby landmarks.

The peregrine falcon nests are marked with red pins.


There are many wonderful things that I am learning from looking at this map.

There were 21 occupied nests last summer; they produced 30 eaglets. 3 of the eaglets did not survive (Phoenix, one of the eaglets of the Heron Rocks nest, and the Dunlop eaglet). 3 were sent to rehab after they were found grounded and too weak to fly.

The 2 closest nests are #32 (Ford Cove) and Heron Rocks. They are about 425 metres apart.  The next closest nests, at 500m apart, are Phipps Point and #4, and Seawright and #25.

The highest density of nests is right here in the Nest Neigbourhood! From Nest #5 to Brigantine, we have a string of 6 nests spaced 550 to 800 m apart.

Other high density areas: Anderson-Whaling Station, and Seawright.

The lowest densities are on the escapments: High Salal and the area between Shingle Spit and Ford Cove. There do happen to be peregrine falcons nesting on both those escarpments... We're collecting data on the interactions of eagles and peregrines.

Each nest, whether or not it is on the waterfront, seems to have a slice of shore that belongs to its territory. The notable exception is nest #36, located far inland in Strachan Valley. But this nest is equidistant from 2 stretches of shore that seem unoccupied at this point.

Actually, I'm not sure about one of those stretches of shoreline: the one between Downes Point and Olsen Farm. Logically, there should be at least one nest in this area; Booni says the neighbours have seen some territorial activity, branches being moved, and so on. There may be other gaps in the information on this map.

The nests are not necessarily the centre of the territory. Some nests are rather crowded together, but have more foreshore space on the other side. From the location of the vacant nests, we can infer that the territories may be fairly stable, and the nests may move within the territories.

Our observations are always partial... many nests are on private land that we do not have access to. Often we observe from the road, which takes its own twists and turns and misleads us as to how the territories fit together... one big surprise was to plot the location of the Wiig nest and find it... ON Sandstone Point! That's much closer to the Cam Nest than I had thought. And yet Mom and Dad Hornby's territory goes right to the near side of Sandstone Point.

That's about all I can think of for now. I'm hoping to make this map more complete as we learn more about the other nests on the Island.

Modifications to this post, January 12: I replaced the map with a new picture with the errors corrected and a bit more information entered. The text was corrected to reflect new information about a dead eaglet found under the Heron Rocks nest.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: muttley on November 29, 2010, 05:36:37 PM
Wren,
          Clearly a labor of love...thank you!!
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on November 29, 2010, 05:49:56 PM
Jon already spotted an error on the map... there are 2 Nests 32! the legit one is on the shore, at Ford Cove. The one inland should be labeled Nest 36. I will correct this next time I get a chance... which will not be today.

Thanks for spotting it, Jon!
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: NancyM on November 29, 2010, 08:03:13 PM
Wren - this is just wonderful!  A lot of work, but with great rewards in terms of understanding of The Eagles Of Hornby Island  ♥

I am very interested in your observations of the falcons, and if there are any falcon- eagle interactions.  I have awatched a couple of falcon cams over the years - it seems they should not compete, but who knows?
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on November 29, 2010, 09:11:44 PM
Wren, thank you for doing such a wonderful map with the various pins, numbers and your explanations.  Thank you also to Doug and Booni for working with you on where the nests and eagles are found currently.  Jon, good spotting!  You really are good at finding details...a great skill to have!

Super Team Work!!!   :heart    :thumbup:
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Rajame on November 29, 2010, 09:34:34 PM
Another amazing feat of work and great gift. Thank you over and over. :heart
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: knitmaster on November 29, 2010, 11:10:50 PM
Wren, thank you so much for this wonderful map - great job!  We are truly blessed to have you and all of HEG!
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: boonibarb on November 30, 2010, 08:27:57 AM


You did a BRILLIANT job on this map Winterwren!!  :nod2
Way to go! :hearts2
It*s so cool to see the *big picture*.
& it*s all so clear & readable.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: luvthebirds on November 30, 2010, 09:47:14 AM
:ty. Winterwren!  :thumbup:
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: BBE on November 30, 2010, 10:07:03 AM
Wren, an incredible job. Add 'map maker' to your CV.  Thank you, Doug and Booni for the knowledge, expertise and time taken to put this together.

 :ty   :thumbup:
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: passerine on November 30, 2010, 10:56:10 AM
Good one Wren, :heart I'm real curious too as how the Peregrines & eagles will inter-relate. As well as other nesting birds in the area.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Doug on November 30, 2010, 04:56:37 PM
A great map Winterwren.  I compared it with the first detailed inventory of nests I made in 1996.  Of those 1996 nests, only our nest, the Savoie Farm nest  and #19 nest are still active today.  Over this 15 year period (1996 to today) the Savoie Farm eagles moved from their original tree about 80 feet to their second nest and more recently 150 feet to their third nest.  The eagles at Nest #19 have moved 4 or 5 times in this same period.  Our eagles are unique in having lived in the same nest for 21 years and are now starting their 22nd year.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: passerine on November 30, 2010, 06:51:37 PM
That's pretty interesting Doug as it does seem more common than not that a pair of eagles will move. Mom & Dad love you & Sheila! :heart
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on November 30, 2010, 06:58:43 PM
We are so fortunate that Mom and Dad Hornby prefer their home tree and nest and don't move like the other eagles seem to be doing on Hornby Island.  Even when the nest slid down off the tree, they rebuilt it in the same place!

They must like their neighbors with the skylight and fish heads and want to stick around!  It's wonderful to have them as your "Tree-top Neighbors," and we all are the beneficiaries.  Thank you, Doug and Sheila.   :s*
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: mother nature on November 30, 2010, 07:46:59 PM
This conversation about eagles moving to different locations to nest made me wonder if other eagle pairs will come in and use an abandoned nest.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: gzebear on December 03, 2010, 03:53:04 AM
I like the map, wren, I like it a lot! Thanks for all your good work and for sharing it with all of us. It is a wonderful reference for your eagle reports, and it will be so interesting to see how this map gets updated in the years to come. Many thanks .... gze
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: emc on December 25, 2010, 04:01:13 PM
Mother Nature, an eagle pair will defend their territory and an old nest within that territory.  Some have been observed using their old nest as a feeding station.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: mother nature on December 29, 2010, 08:49:09 PM
Mother Nature, an eagle pair will defend their territory and an old nest within that territory.  Some have been observed using their old nest as a feeding station.

Thanks for finding and answering my question !
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on January 12, 2011, 08:22:00 PM
I have replaced the map picture in this post (http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=54.msg37531#msg37531) so the errors are corrected (nest 36 is now correctly tagged...) and there is a bit more information.

I was given the correct location of Nest 36. It is very near where I had initially placed it, but now the location does not seem random anymore: it tells a story.
This nest is located on one of the two permanent creeks on Hornby island. (Almost all the creeks on the map are seasonal). There was another nest, Nest #26, further down on that creek. The people who live near Nest 36 tell me that Nest 26 is vacant. I'm wondering if the same eagles worked their way gradually up the creek? This is a very small creek, deep in woods for most of its length... Definitely not a fishing river. Yet it does link Strachan Valley to the south-east shore of the island... maybe this answers the question about which part of the shore, if any, belongs to those eagles?  There seems to be no nest near the mouth of that creek! I'm not sure about this.

There is also some new information about the Heron Rocks nest. I had heard rumours of a dead eaglet below that nest tree. It now appears that this was probably one of last summer's eaglets. I have not yet been able to get more information about this. But it brings the total number of eaglets to 30 and the number of fatalities to 3.

I have also identified Windy Point and Savoie Rocks on the map. We're watching that area right now because a new pair of eagles seems to have moved in.

We're still a bit unsure about some of the other areas, but the map records our best information up to today.

About the areas with low densities of nests: Doug posted elsewhere that the high densities seem to happen in areas where the intertidal zone is very large. Our own Nest Neighbourhood is an example. Shores with a large intertidal zone offer better fishing grounds. The sections of steep shore have a correspondingly narrower intertidal zone. The intertidal below the High Salal cliffs is particularly narrow; there have not been any eagle nests reported in the area. The Mount Geoffrey escarpment has a slightly wider shelf that is accessible at low tide... and it has been used sporadically.

So maybe the peregrine falcons don't have an impact on the eagles... even if they do spend an inordinate amount of time playing king-of-the-castle... So that would be a case of correlation without causation. :ecsmile

(I hope so! I'm rooting for the Windy Point and Shingle Spit eagles.)
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on January 12, 2011, 08:33:54 PM
Wren, thanks for the very interesting information about some of the other nests and the conditions that encourage nest-building in an area.  There is so much going on re eagles on Hornby Island.  Thanks for continuing to update and report on new things and changes you observe.  You and Booni really add a lot to the Hornby eagles viewing experience for all of us on the forum.   :thumbup:

 :heart
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: passerine on January 12, 2011, 09:29:56 PM
We have eagle pairs moving inland too, I'm thinking a couple reasons...lots of eagles....development.... They also seem to be nesting by creeks & small rivulets, there's a pair in Whiskey Creek which is quite far inland another by French Creek in Coombs.  Another pair in Errington. Puzzling.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on January 12, 2011, 10:53:43 PM
There must be eagles in many places in North America that live near rivers and lakes, rather than the ocean.  Doug said they like to drink and bathe in fresh water, if they have the chance.  I've seen videos of eagles bathing in fresh water and it's easy to see that they really are enjoying it!    :eclove
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Sherina on May 09, 2011, 03:19:42 AM
Of course, when i get free i will visit  to the Other Nests of Hornby Island.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Blue on May 30, 2011, 12:44:30 PM
Booni and Wren,

You have not posted observations this year on Nest #15 at Tralee Point. This was where HEART rescued young Decker last August. Is anything happening there?

Decker captured our hearts.


FREEDOM FOR DECKER  


(http://img14.imageshack.us/img14/9020/deckerinniwraflightpen.jpg) (http://img14.imageshack.us/i/deckerinniwraflightpen.jpg/)
Decker in the NIWRA flight pen


Decker, the Hornby eaglet, will be ready to be released in three or four weeks!

It has been a long road to recovery for Decker. He has grown new tail feathers to replace those missing when he was found in a malnourished condition on Hornby Island last August.

The Hornby Eagle Group Projects Society (HEGPS) is sponsoring this fundraiser in recognition of the long care that North Island Wildlife Recovery Association (NIWRA) has given Decker.

He will be released in the name of HEGPS and Friends. NIWRA would be happy to have any of us present when they free Decker. They will invite us to meet them at the chosen place, somewhere between the NIWRCentre and Hornby - but not on Hornby. They will choose a site that is within Decker's natural territory and a time when weather conditions are favourable for him. Food sources will be plentiful then and this year's babies out of the nest.

* * * * *


Please click on this link for more information:

http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=818.msg57300#msg57300
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on May 30, 2011, 02:36:10 PM


Blue, we haven't yet found a spot from which we can see Decker's home, the Lunar Rock nest. It is well hidden in thick forest. We don't even know for sure if there has been a nesting attempt in this territory... though Booni did hear some territorial calls from that area.

Checking this nest is on my to-do list, but I'm waiting until the eaglets are more easily heard from the ground. We will find them by sound if nothing else...

The shore there is very beautiful, and it's well worth returning to just for that beauty.

Thanks for posting the news about Decker's release... this is really wonderful.

 :ecsmile
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Blue on May 30, 2011, 03:34:01 PM
Thanks, Wren! I will look forward to any observations you post. I should have known you wouldn't overlook Decker's nest. I haven't followed closely enough to know the name is changed and you do have a topic for it.

Sure hope you will be able to attend Decker's release.  :nod2
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on May 30, 2011, 03:40:03 PM
I wonder how Decker found his way to the deck of the home where he was found?  Good thing he did and now we'll enjoy seeing him fly freely, as he was meant to do, thanks to our H.E.A.R.T. team, the tree climbers, MARS, NIWRA, and all the other people who helped and chatters and viewers who contributed to his care.    :thumbup:

 :grouphug2
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on May 31, 2011, 10:27:30 PM
The house where Decker found refuge is the closest to the nest, and right next to the shore. He may even have glided that far - he was capable of horizontal flight, he just could not gain elevation. The people there gave him food, so he stuck around. It's possible that he spent some of his nights hidden under the house's deck - he took refuge there when Booni and I approached to capture him.

For further info on Decker's home territory, the Lunar Rock nest,  click here. (http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=535.msg31884#msg31884) - a good place to post further discussion about Decker as well?

To see the full story of Decker's entrance into our lives, click this link to last year's archives. (http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=426.msg23081#msg23081)


Title: how many Hornby Island eaglets - 2011 Season
Post by: blackster1 on July 08, 2011, 09:45:36 PM
How many eaglets have you and Wren identified this year?
Title: how many Hornby Island eaglets - 2011 Season
Post by: boonibarb on July 08, 2011, 10:04:09 PM

Nest #4 - 1
Nest #6/7 - 2
Webcam Nest #10 - 2
Wiig Nest - 1
Lunar Rocks Nest - 1 at least
Nest #16-19 - 1 so far
Nest #20 - 2
Nest #21 - 1 so far
Nest #22 - 1 so far
Nest #24 - 1
Nest #25 - 1 at least
Dunlop Nest - 2
Nest #32 - 2

Title: how many Hornby Island eaglets - 2011 Season
Post by: Tigerlady105 on July 08, 2011, 10:14:44 PM
Booni, that number of eaglets, plus the two in Nest # 10, "our eaglets, is a nice total for Hornby Island this year!  :thumbup:   Thank you for the information.  
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on July 13, 2011, 07:55:18 PM
(I'm reserving this spot for more stats from the 2009-2010 season, before I move on to information from this year)
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on July 13, 2011, 08:23:03 PM
Here's what I know about the eagle pairs that are regularly fed by their human neighbours. I hope I'm not betraying any big secrets by posting this; humans have always fed their neighbourhood eagles. Predators and scavengers have this kind of relationship; humans are predators, and eagles are, in part, scavengers. This is just a part of the effort to track how much food has been available to our eagles this season.

Shingle Spit nest receives fresh salmon scraps from a small commercial smoked-salmon business about twice a week. One family also puts their animal and fish scraps on the beach for the eagles. Transient eagles seem to sniff out those feedings and it's common to see a dozen eagles there. But the Shingle Spit pair do seem to get their share each time. The feeding is surprisingly orderly; there are few fights. Once in a while an immature gets feisty, but otherwise everyone seems to take a turn.

Phipps Point and Nest #4 are fed fish heads, together, by one of the neighbours. Here too things seem to proceed in an orderly manner. Nest #4's big dogfish carcass of last week did not come from this neighbour, however. So someone else is leaving fish scraps for nest #4, though we do not know how regularly. Another neighbour of the Phipps Point nest participates in the opossum trapping program and leaves all the dead possums to the eagles.

The pair from nest #5, or nest #8 (we don't know which one is occupied, both trees are in thick forest on private land) receive fish heads from a nearby fisherman regularly.

Nests #8 and 9 are nearest the Highways Department's gravel pit, where the workers leave all road-killed animals for the eagles and vultures.

The neighbours of Nest 21 feed their eagles salmon or deer meat, especially this year because they are concerned with food supplies.

The Nest 32 eagles have learned to glean the fish heads from the fishing dock at Ford Cove. They have been seen diving right after some salmon heads that had already sunk a few feet below the water. We're talking sports fishing here, so not huge quantities, but probably a good steady supply.

Nobody is feeding the Nest 36 eagles on purpose, but a lot of chickens disappear from the surrounding farms; looks like those eagles have become chicken specialists. The depredations on upper Slade road may also be from these eagles.

It is interesting to note that, despite regular feedings by humans, the Shingle Spit and Phipps Point eagles did not have any eaglets this year. So this points out the possibility that the autumn salmon runs might be a large deciding factor in nest productivity.

Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: blackster1 on July 13, 2011, 08:38:26 PM
Thank you Wren for your research on the feeding of the nests and the time you spend sharing the information with us.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: birdvoyer on July 14, 2011, 05:03:00 AM
This will be interesting to follow and correlate with future information. Thank you for looking at this aspect from other sources.

These detective stories are far better than the Nancy Drew books I read when young!


 :heart
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on July 14, 2011, 03:32:03 PM
Thank you for the information.  That helps us to see the larger picture on Hornby Island.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: watermaid on July 15, 2011, 02:18:48 PM
Hi Wren,  I have found your post about the feeding of eagles on Hornby Island to be most interesting.  Thank you so much.  :heart
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: boonibarb on July 16, 2011, 09:31:54 AM

wrennie, one thing i am thinking a LOT about right now, thanks to all your observations & fotos of the different Nests this year, & AJL*s teachings of what to watch for on the web cam, is how much repetition there is in the behaviour of the Eaglets from year to year.
i remember photographing last year*s Trimblet on the SAME branch as you are photographing this year*s on.
& i am thinking how on the web cam Nest, the Eaglets start by attaining the close up cam box - the equivalent of a branch, to them - & then go for the farther out branches of the Nest Tree, the Stump & the wide angle cam box.
There is a learning curve, & it is repeated from year to year, & is taught to them by Mums Dads!!  :hearts2
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Bluewing4 on July 16, 2011, 02:06:29 PM
Hi Booni,  I just learned you may have  a photo of a possible more recent siting of Hope.  If you do and can post the link or photo here, I would just love to see it and several others on chat have expressed great interest too. Thank you kindly, Bluewing
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: mishikeenhquay on July 16, 2011, 04:31:36 PM
Wren
Gitchi miigwetch for your observations and the time it takes you to correlate and post this for us to all see and learn from.  I guess that all neighbors on Hornby take care of the eagles that are near their homes....what a great thing to hear!!  It is such a gift to have these ground observations of all of the nests on Hornby.  
Again....I greatly appreciate your time and expertise!!

Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: boonibarb on July 16, 2011, 08:51:35 PM

Hiya there Bluewing!
Here is the link to my Hope album.
If you hover your mouse over the little pictures, you will see a title & date show up.
Click on the foto you want to view, then click it again to see the different sizes.
The top row of the group of fotos, december 18 2009 is a series of fotos of whom i believe is Hope.
The bottom two rows also contain fotos of an Eagle i believe to be Hope.


Click here for Hope foto album (http://www.flickr.com/photos/43214021@N08/sets/72157622779902556/)
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Bluewing4 on September 18, 2011, 07:45:41 PM
Thanks Booni, just found this . :ecsmile
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on October 17, 2011, 01:47:40 PM
Here is the second edition of my nest map.

This map sums up our observations of the nests of Hornby Island for the summer of 2011. The information was collected from direct observation by Booni and myself, and from conversations with the nests' neighbours.
Click on the map to see the larger size, and click again to explore details.

(http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6214/6244377809_3edf35dd1f_z.jpg) (http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6214/6244377809_b76628d802_o.jpg)

You can compare it to the map I made in 2010 Here (http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=54.msg37531#msg37531).


This year, I added the information about "unsuccessful nesting attempts" to get closer to the format used by WiTS. So, a green pin with no number on it means that the nest was worked on and the territory occupied, but no eaglets were born. I also added white pins to indicate the nests whose status this year is unknown. This year we did not have time to check all the nests before the eaglets flew.
Transparent pins still indicate unoccupied nests and former nesting sites. Not all the former nesting sites are on this map, only those that I am familiar with.
The map is busier because I included the stats from last year. The labels give the nests' name, and then the stats for 2010.  I used blue pins in 2010, so the blue dots indicate that the nest was occupied, and the numbers beside them show the number of eaglets that year.

There were about 20 occupied nests on Hornby Island this year, and about 22 eaglets were born. (I shall qualify those numbers shortly.) This compares with 22 occupied nests last year (I'm counting Nest #24, which qualified as a "nesting attempt") and 30 eaglets.
 
We were unable to obtain information on the status of the Seawright nest and the Olsen Farm nest. So it's possible that the number of nests is actually as high as last year. The eaglet count could also be correspondingly higher.
Nests #5 and #8 are a special problem of their own: both are in thick forest, on private land that we do not have access to. The owners are unsure of the nests' exact locations; some or the perch trees are visible, but the eaglets are only heard, and not seen. It is even possible that both nests are on the same territory and only one at a time is in use.
The number of eaglets at the Lunar Rock nest is an unconfirmed guess; we do know that the Lunar Rock pair were incubating eggs.
 
There were no fatalities this year, but one eaglet (Nest #22) was too weak to fly and went to rehab. This compares with 3 fatalities and 3 rehabs last year.

In 2010, we were aware of only one unsuccessful nesting attempt: Nest #24. This year, 4 nests were without issue. Of these, we know that Shingle Spit, Phipps Point and Brigantine did not incubate any eggs, based on the behaviour of the eagle pairs in the spring. The territories were occupied until early summer. We have no detailed information from the other unsuccessful nesting attempt, at Heron Rocks.

ps: I will re-take the photo when I can set up under better light... this will have to do for now.

Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: ccfan on October 17, 2011, 02:11:49 PM
Fascinating that the spacing between the nests seems so regular...
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Mary Jane on October 17, 2011, 02:13:17 PM
Wonderful Wren, what great information - thank you so much  :eclove
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Rajame on October 17, 2011, 03:35:26 PM
Oh wow! I just moved my mouse and the scroll bar around and looked at each one - I also marvel at the work that you all have done. If I added up the times that I want to hug you both, I would need to get out a calculator and sit down for an hour!  :ecwink

Thank you,
:hearts2
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: idahowa on October 17, 2011, 05:19:34 PM
AWESOME WREN!  That clarifies a lot.  Thanks for the hard work!
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: birdsofprey on October 24, 2011, 06:58:09 PM
Thanks so much wren for all the hard work.  :heart
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on November 09, 2011, 01:31:18 AM
This anecdote is from Denman Island, but it answers a question I've had for several years about our local nests.

The question is this: do eagles ever return to a nest after abandoning it? In other words: if an eagle pair moves from nest A to nest B, is their next move invariably to a new nest C, or do they ever return to nest A?

We have suspected that this may have been the case with Nests #16-17-18-19, but as far as I know it has never been proven. The nests are in thick forest and difficult to see from the ground.

A young man who I used to work with told me this story.
There is a nest right by this young man's house. He can see it from a window of his house. A pair of eagles lived there for years, but last summer they moved. They built a new nest in another tree a few hundred feet away.
The eagles were not able to raise a clutch in that nest. They were on the nest in the spring, but no eaglets appeared. The neighbours cut some trees around incubation time, and my friend thinks that this disturbed the brooding process. Still, the eagles maintained the territory and the nest through the summer.

Now the eagles have returned from the salmon rivers. And they have started bringing branches to their first nest! My friend can again watch them from his window.


Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on November 09, 2011, 02:34:03 AM
Wren, that's a very interesting observation.  The reasons for moving must be many. Mom and Dad Hornby seem very contented with their one nest location for all of the years since they first built it.  :eclove
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: BBE on November 30, 2011, 11:48:27 AM
Wren,  :thumbup: and many thanks for the map with the extremely interesting nest info.  That must have taken a lot of time to do.   To have that documentation is super.  :ty :heart
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: boonibarb on December 29, 2011, 09:43:13 AM

Recently, i have been spotting youngsters!
There have been three occasions where i have been in my yard, heard trilling, & looked up to see a youngster flying over!
One of the Ninelets returned perhaps?
Yesterday there were two occasions when i heard trilling & spotted a youngster flying in the area of Nest #16-19.
Also, one time on monday.
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on December 29, 2011, 01:11:00 PM
 :thumbup:  Booni!
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: boonibarb on December 29, 2011, 07:55:25 PM

Oh yeah, i forgot, there were also a couple of youngsters on Tribune Bay, one near Nest #24 & two going feet to feet on my way to work yesterday!
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: cjs on January 14, 2012, 07:22:21 AM
  I was not able to keep up with the 2011 eagles. Did they survive? :eclove
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Tigerlady105 on January 14, 2012, 07:49:43 AM
Which eagles do you mean, cjs?  Both of the 2011 Hornby eaglets, Alexandra and David, did very well.   They fledged and left for the salmon runs when it was time to leave their nest permanently.   :thumbup:

Here are threads where you can read about them and see screen caps and photos:

http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?board=50.0

http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=525.0

Or, were you asking about other eaglets?
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on January 14, 2012, 10:16:11 AM
As for the other eagles on the island, we are not aware of any fatalities during the 2011 season (though of course we can't look into the nests, so some earlier fatalities in the less-visible nests are always possible).  One eaglet, "Shredder" Helliwell, was too weak to fly and was sent for rehab at MARS. Her story is under the MARS thread on this forum. She was successfully released in the fall. And another eaglet, the youngest sibling from Nest 20, had us worried because his feather tips were damaged by malnutrition. He fledged successfully, and we are keeping our fingers crossed for him.
 
I saw a similar eaglet of the same age at Big Qualicum River on December 8, so I now know that birds with this type of feather deformity can indeed survive those critical first few months after fledging.  (Click here (http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=637.msg89199#msg89199) to see the posting about that sighting.)
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on August 09, 2012, 12:10:48 AM
On July 17 I took a long walk on the foreshore, trying to scout the area from Olsen Farm to Dunlop point for eagle nests. This is a big stretch of foreshore, and if you look at the map (click Here (http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=54.msg78306#msg78306) to see it) you will see that there is room for at least one nest. You can see that big gap of shoreline on the lower right side of the map.
On the other hand, if you look at Nest 36, you will find it inland from the middle of that stretch of unoccupied foreshore. So is this nest 36's beach? One of the people who live along that shore has seen an eagle carrying branches... that's really far to carry for that nest.
So, I've wanted to go walk around there at the time of year when the eaglets are really loud, to see what I could see and hear what I could hear.

First, I came in from the Olsen farm end (from the bottom if you look at the map). Those eaglets are REALLY loud. I started walking below the escarpment. The foreshore is huge around Heron Rocks and Olsen farm, but it narrows to a jumble of huge boulders further along, and despite the low tide I could not get through safely.
So, that's one argument against a nest in this area: from the end of the Olsen Farm territory to the beginning of the Dunlops' hunting ground, the intertidal zone is very narrow and offers few of the tide pools that the eagles like to fish from. No midshipmen along that escarpment or around Downes Point.

Still, I thought I could hear faint, faint screeps from time to time.
So I retraced my steps and came in from the opposite direction, from Sandpiper beach, at the end of the Dunlop Point territory.

I walked south-west from there, around Downes Point, until I could see the Heron Rocks and Olsen Farm area.
This is a picture I took near the end of my walk. I am standing on the south side of Downes point, looking south-west. Click on it to enlarge it...
The furthest land mass you see on the left side of the picture is Vancouver Island with its snow-capped mountains. Still looking left, the next band of land is the south end of Denman Island.
The furthest point of land, with rocks extending from it, is Heron Rocks. The Olsen Farm nest is obscured by the left-most boulder.
In the middle background of the photo is the escarpment that stopped my progress when I approached from the other end. Someone who lives on the top of that cliff saw an eagle carrying branches last year.

In the foreground is another one of those  mysterious bowling balls from outer space (http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=532.msg113045#msg113045)... this one bears a cryptic message in Martian braille.
July 17, 2:40 pm
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8422/7744763822_13333a250c_z.jpg) (http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8422/7744763822_50bb6bebea_o.jpg)


I walked to a spot closer to the cliff. Behind me, faintly, I could hear the Dunlop Point eaglets. Ahead of me, the ones from Olsen Farm.

In between... Nothing.
Now, of course, negative findings are less convincing than positive ones. Maybe it was nap time... Even with the racket from the neighbours?
Was it the Dunlops I could hear faintly from near the Olsen Farm nest? I'm still not sure.

Anyway. No eagles heard. Plenty of beauty and unusual sightings of other kinds. Two herons flying to perch on branches... I'll post that elsewhere.

Then this:

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8441/7744768004_02c9b47f7a_z.jpg) (http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8441/7744768004_2922299092_o.jpg)

Downes Point is a large jumble of sculpted sandstone. There is no vegetation on the foreshore; cliffs isolate it from the meadows above. And yet I saw three deer in a row, negotiating the rocky maze. What are they doing here?  :puzzled2

This may be the answer:

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8301/7744771328_aa9c9f4c31_z.jpg) (http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8301/7744771328_57b3642b08_o.jpg)

Click on the picture. You'll see crystals. Salt!
The highest tides fill little pools; then the saltwater evaporates in the sun, making... Natural salt licks??? Some of them did indeed look as if they had been licked off.

And everywhere, the strange shapes of wind-sculpted sandstone.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7261/7744775622_2b40ed1104_z.jpg) (http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7261/7744775622_199a275b37_o.jpg)



Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Cawatcher on August 15, 2012, 10:07:41 PM
facinating  :eceek
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: boodle317 on August 16, 2012, 05:56:46 AM
Wow Wren....incredible landscapes.!
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: passerine on August 16, 2012, 12:51:16 PM
Wow Wren....incredible landscapes.!

It is, I do hope next time on Hornby to be able to stroll by there. :ecsmile
Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: winterwren on September 30, 2013, 10:29:23 PM
This posting may cause some confusion.
That is because it is a full year late.
This is the map of the eagle nests of Hornby Island for the summer of 2012.

I will put the 2013 stats on the map after people have had a chance to look at this one and spot any errors that may be in it.
Click on the map to make it bigger; click again to examine any area in more detail.


(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3775/10030268824_c321271f0c_z.jpg) (http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3775/10030268824_b034998df2_o.jpg)


The information on this map comes from Booni's observations and my own, and from informal interviews with the neighbours and visitors of the various nests. You can find most of that information in the relevant threads of this forum.

During the summer of 2012, we counted 22 active nests. There may have been at least one more: Nest #3 was proved to be active in 2013, so it was probably active in 2012 also, but we have no data for that year.

We counted 27 eaglets among the active nests. One nest, Nest #7, was definitely active but we were unable to check if it had any eaglets, for lack of time.  One eaglet, on Nest #4, died before fledging, so our eaglet count for the year stands at 26. The actual count is probably higher by anywhere from one to four eaglets.

No eaglets needed rescue and rehabilitation during that season. (I think that's right... Shredder was in 2011.)

We confirmed the locations of two nests during 2012: the Little Tribune/Seawright nest, and the Olsen Farm nest. Eaglets had been sighted or heard in both of those areas on previous years.

Four eagle pairs were unproductive in 2012, either laying no eggs or hatching none. They were Nest #20 at Whaling Station Bay, whose nest was damaged in a winter storm, Nest #22 in Helliwell Park, Nest #36 in Strachan Valley, and the Heron Rocks nest, to which I will return below.

Three eagle pairs moved to different trees within their territory: Belcarra, moving closer to the water from one of Nests #16, 17, 18 or 19; Lunar Rock moved back closer to their old nest site on Tralee Point, and Heron Rocks moved a few hundred metres east of their old nest.
Sometimes the stories only become clear long after the fact. This is the case for the Heron Rocks nest. In the summer of 2012 we saw no activity near the old nest site. With the HIP people, we found a tree that had a pile of branches in it; an adult eagle was perching nearby.  But that pile of branches looked too scanty for a nest. It was only in the spring of 2013 that I saw someone sitting on that pile, now greatly augmented: so what we saw in June 2012 was indeed the start of a new nest at Heron Rocks, and I have added it as such on the map.

Nests #5 and 8 are still a mystery. I have yet to sight either of them. Nest #8 is said to be in thick forest, and Nest #5 is said to be somewhere on private land that we do not have permission to enter. Both locations are very approximate on the map. The two sites are close enough to each other that they may well be two nest sites in one territory. This map assumes that they are, but that assumption may be erroneous. What we do know is that one eagle pair sometimes perches within view of the road in that area, and each year these eagles bring their eaglets to feed on the gifts of a fisherman who lives between the two nest sites. The data on the map comes from this person.


Title: Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
Post by: Cawatcher on October 01, 2013, 09:21:43 AM
Thank you for the update and all your hard work Wren
 :heart