HEGPS ~ Our Nature Zone

Nature's Wonders => Wildlife - Flora and Fauna => Topic started by: madrona on September 15, 2010, 09:53:27 PM

Title: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: madrona on September 15, 2010, 09:53:27 PM
This is a place for us to discuss the plants that are native to our areas, or areas we have visited – from trees such as the endangered Garry Oaks on Vancouver Island (my area) to wildflowers and humble local mosses - and what they contribute to the local ecosystem.  We hope for lots of illustrations!
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Tigerlady105 on September 15, 2010, 10:26:43 PM
This is going to be a great place to share ideas and pictures!  Thanks for making it, Madrona!    :eclove

The birds like these berries!

Pyracantha

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4034/4343192874_01a274be2a.jpg)
©2010 Tigerlady105
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: NancyM on September 16, 2010, 07:29:51 AM
I do not live in Italy, but I made a trip there this past June.  We were in a beautiful area near the very tip of the "heel of the boot."  One day, while touring, we passed through a very hilly area near the sea. We stopped to look at something or other and I noticed these beautiful plants growing wild along the rocky hillside.  One of our Italian colleagues explained that this was the plant that yields capers!  I had no idea the flowers were so beautiful. For that matter, I'm not sure that I knew that capers were the small tight buds of this species.

Wikipedia says this species is "present in almost all the circum-Mediterranean countries and is included in the floristic composition of most of them but whether it is indigenous to this region is uncertain. Although the flora of the Mediterranean region has considerable endemism, the caper bush could have a tropical origin, been only naturalized in the Mediterranean basin." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caper


Capparis spinosa L.

(http://inlinethumb04.webshots.com/45379/2681384260027400073S500x500Q85.jpg) (http://travel.webshots.com/photo/2681384260027400073iCJJwp)

(http://inlinethumb24.webshots.com/19287/2563259300027400073S500x500Q85.jpg) (http://travel.webshots.com/photo/2563259300027400073hwekjp)
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: boonibarb on September 16, 2010, 08:10:03 AM


Beautiful flowers & plant!
i LOVE seeing what grows under rocky/dry conditions.
Lovely fotos Nancy.

Someone told me that capers are also the buds of Nasturtiums?
i wonder if that is false information.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: madrona on September 16, 2010, 09:44:57 AM
What a gorgeous picture of the Pyracantha berries, Tigerlady!  The birds certainly do love the berries, and I wonder if they also help spread the plants?

I was curious to find out whether this plant, the shrub Pyracantha coccinea Roem (firethorn) was indeed native to N. America.  In reading about it, I discovered that it is Native to parts of Asia and Europe  (Click) (http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?30398)  A Plant distribution map indicates that it is also native to British Columbia -  (See Here) (http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PYCO2&mapType=nativity&photoID=pyco2_001_ahp.tif) and introduced into the US.

I recall that it was quite common in England, and when I visited a friend in France, where it is apparently a native plant, he was so concerned about security for his property that in addition to a gate and surveillance camera, he had incorporated Pyracantha alongside his wall to deter intruders!  It is certainly a very thorny plant.   :eceek

I was interested to discover that it is related to Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster Horizontalis has become so invasive in some parts of England that it has been banned!)  It is a 'volunteer' plant that springs up all over our yard here on Vancouver Island, and is especially loved by the ground-foraging birds like the juncos and towhees - and I am sure that birds are responsible for spreading it.   This photo, taken this morning shows it growing in our yard, where the birds planted it (beside a small holly bush also planted by birds).   :ecsmile 

(http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc103/takecare_2007/cotoneaster2.jpg)

This plant is also native to parts of Asia, but has likely been introduced and naturalized here. 

 
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: passerine on September 16, 2010, 11:11:30 AM
Beautiful plant Nancy, since they grow wild there, is probably one of the reasons they're prevalent in Mediterranean diets.

I looked up the firethorn too Mad. :ecwink it says that Robins, Blackbirds, Thrushes, House Sparrows & Waxwings are attracted to them. Apparently the birds can get some what drunk form the berries. The butterfly the Holly blue will also lay its eggs on pyracantha and the caterpillar eats the flowers and berries! Bees love the flowers for nectar.. Sounds like a great plant to get if someones is wanting to attract wildlife.

One article i read said it was a member of the rose family.

Disclaimer: These are articles from the net i have no personal knowledge of this plant.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: madrona on September 16, 2010, 12:52:39 PM
Nancy - I love capers - they are great, liberally sprinkled on cold-smoked salmon slices (lox) and thinly sliced onion on rye bread!   :biggrin6

I learned from orovalaz (a HEG member) that capers are actually pickled flower buds - she lived on Crete in the Mediterranean for some time.  She showed me photos too and I thought then that the flowers were exquisite.

I have often wondered if they would grow here - although, of course, we should be very careful about introducing non-native species. :nope  Our rocky and southern exposure (where I live) has a distinctive Mediterranean feel - to the extent that we actually have an olive tree and fig trees.  I did notice, from reading the info in the URL you posted, that capers don't tolerate frost well, so it's maybe not a good idea, and might be why I haven't seen them around here - we do get some frost in the winter on Vancouver Island, for sure.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Tigerlady105 on September 16, 2010, 01:31:23 PM
I have had pyracantha in the backyard for years and it does well here, since we have a Mediterranean climate.  We get an occasional frost, but it climbs all over the neighbor's garage roof if it isn't pruned once-in-awhile and seems to get enough shelter and absorbed warmth there so it doesn't die off. 

In Northern California, is grows along many roads in neighborhoods where people have planted it.  This time of year, the berries start coloring...turning from green to yellow to orange and then the well-known bright red.  It's a marker for the holidays that are on the way and I love to see the changes when I watch the berries transform into bright red.  Very festive-looking! :biggrin6

We tried hibiscus and bougainvillea in the backyard, too, but it's too cold for both of them there, so they have to be in the front yard.  Micro-climates can be tricky!   :ecsmile
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: passerine on September 16, 2010, 01:45:16 PM
I have had pyracantha in the backyard for years and it does well here, since we have a Mediterranean climate.  We get an occasional frost, but it climbs all over the neighbor's garage roof if it isn't pruned once-in-awhile and seems to get enough shelter and absorbed warmth there so it doesn't die off. 

snip
Tigger it's the capers that like the Mediterean climate, pyracantha does well here on VI.

Mountain Ash has the red berries Robins & Waxwings like too, I've been keeping a close eye for the birds to start in on them, as there is a street in town lined with them so hoping to get some good pics.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Tigerlady105 on September 16, 2010, 02:12:56 PM
Mountain Ash is beautiful, especially with the red berries!   :ecsmile  The leaves are interesting, too. :nod2

I like a few capers with smoked salmon and a little lemon juice added for flavor. Yummmmmm :ecsmile
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: madrona on September 16, 2010, 03:48:44 PM
The birds have now stripped all the berries off the Mountain Ash trees (just saplings that the birds must have planted over the years).  I did take some photos earlier, over a month ago.

(http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc103/takecare_2007/MtAshinFlowerBed-August2010.jpg)
Above is the one that we let continue to grow in our flower bed.

(http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc103/takecare_2007/MountainAshBerries-Aug2010.jpg)
Close up of the berries.

After a little research on the Mountain Ash I discovered that there are 4 species native to Canada -
 The Canadian Encyclopedia. (http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0005491)

Quote from: The Canadian Encyclopedia
Mountain Ash (Sorbus) are a genus of small trees or shrubs of the rose family (Rosaceae), consisting of perhaps 100 species distributed in temperate Eurasia and North America. Plants are deciduous, lack thorns, and have simple or pinnate (feather-like) leaves with 9-11 leaflets. Creamy white flowers form large, flat-topped clusters. Small, red, applelike fruits are much sought after by birds. There are 4 species native to Canada, usually found in moist woods: 2 eastern (S. americana, S. decora) and 2 western (S. scopulina, S. sitchensis).

I discovered more interesting information about the Mountain Ash (Sorbus)  here (http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/2114/)
Quote from: Dave's Garden
Many northern gardeners are familiar with Sorbus, known as mountain-ash in North America or rowans in Europe. These relatively small trees are wonderful additions to the garden for their floral display of white flowers in spring, attractive crop of orange-red berries in autumn  and if you want to attract fruit-eating birds to your garden, then mountain-ash are one of the best woody plants to cultivate. However, what you may not know is that this genus of about 50 species shows considerable variation. While the common garden varieties are trees up to 12 m, there are some species that barely reach a foot! We typically think of mountain-ash as having orange-red fruit but among the many species that exist, this is a rare colour; white coloured berries are far more common, but they also come in yellow, pink and many subtle, in-between shades. And as common as mountain-ash are in North America and Europe, we, as a whole, have relatively few native species; the vast majority hail from the Himalayas.

Last edited 11:50 PM PDT Sept 16
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Tigerlady105 on September 16, 2010, 06:20:31 PM
Madrona, the birds are smart. They drop the seeds and then harvest the berries when they grow on the trees!   :chuckle
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: gmadeb3 on June 07, 2011, 03:40:37 PM
(http://i896.photobucket.com/albums/ac162/gmadeb3/PurpleMartins025.jpg)   Rose from the garden
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Tigerlady105 on June 07, 2011, 07:06:46 PM
Gorgeous rose, Gmadeb!  It's now starring as a puzzle on our forum puzzle thread!   :eclove
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on June 07, 2011, 08:43:57 PM
I'm amazed at the beautiful tulip varieties that are available now. Here's one from the Faerie Garden that looks and even SMELLS like a rose!!

     (http://width=600 height=450]http://i1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/June%20%202011/June562011020.jpg)


Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Tigerlady105 on June 07, 2011, 09:37:11 PM
Faerie Gardener, that is a beautiful tulip.  Hard to believe that it isn't a rose!  Your garden must feel magical, with all the lovely things you have there!   :eclove
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on June 08, 2011, 01:26:44 PM
Aw, thanks, Tigerlady...gardens can be such a nice place to be, even if you happen to be a human!

Here is the tulip with its buddies, showing the tulip foliage (Definitely a Tulip!)

(http://i1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/June%20%202011/June562011021.jpg)
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on June 26, 2011, 07:36:12 PM
This is a shrub that's a little unusual. It's called a Tree Peony. It has different colored blossoms than the traditional Peony, and it is not fragrant. This one is 29 years old, but it has been moved several times, and they are finicky about that.

           (http://i1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/Faerie%20Garden%202011/June262011021.jpg)

   Here's a closer view of this pretty blossom

           (http://i1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/Faerie%20Garden%202011/June262011023.jpg)
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: watermaid on June 26, 2011, 10:35:32 PM
Hi Faerie,  Thank you for showing us a most gorgeous flower.  :heart
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Tigerlady105 on June 27, 2011, 05:32:46 PM
Faerie Gardener, that's a beautiful peony.  We don't see them here (Mediterranean climate).  Thanks for sharing them with us this way.   :eclove  That must be hardy one to be moved that often and be that old.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on June 28, 2011, 05:53:56 AM
You're welcome, Watermaid and Tigerlady. It is, indeed, a hardy one! I was afraid I had lost it several times, but it is so happy now in a protected spot. BTW, after having a blossom in a vase for a few days now, I realize that it does have a very faint, sweet fragrance. A nice bonus!

Also, if you look closely to the left of the flower, you can see one of the newer leaves. The leaves are deeply indented, and the new ones start out a deep bronze color.  Double bonus!
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on July 10, 2011, 09:42:38 PM
The Lupine has finally formed seed pods, and soon it will almost disappear from view!
    (http://i1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/July%205%202011/July52011006.jpg)

This one is clickable so you'll be able to see the seeds close up with two clicks!:
     (http://i1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/July%205%202011/th_July52011005.jpg) (http://s1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/July%205%202011/?action=view&current=July52011005.jpg)
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: jungleland on September 17, 2011, 07:47:16 PM
I always take my camera kayaking.  I was looking for water lilies to take a picture of and saw this unusual plant sticking out of the pond we were in.  It was mixed with some water grass.  I had never seen it before.  Does anyone know what this is?  My husband was patiently waiting for me to take a couple pics.  A thunderstorm with strong winds was moving in and just as we tied the kayaks to the van the first rain drops fell.  Then it pour buckets!

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-jlAX3pIaRJs/TnVZ6_5JhwI/AAAAAAAAAsw/Zbv2Pq7wjaA/s640/DSCN2106.JPG)
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Tigerlady105 on September 17, 2011, 10:33:48 PM
That orange-red flower is a beauty, Jungleland.  I've seen photos of a similar shape, but not that color and don't know the name.  Hope someone can tell us!   :eclove
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: passerine on September 18, 2011, 08:09:03 AM
No idea either but it is an interesting looking flower.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: basenjimom on September 18, 2011, 11:10:17 AM
Is it the flower of the Pitcher Plant?    http://www.weeksbay.org/photo_gallery/wintemeyer/wintemeyer.htm
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on September 18, 2011, 12:31:36 PM
That was my thought too...
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Blue on September 18, 2011, 01:53:55 PM
It could be Spatterdock which has heart-shaped leaves like waterlilies. I do find the outer sepals and inner closed petals puzzling though. It looks like a flower that hasn't opened, probably because it has turned too cold, hence the reddish tones instead of being bright yellow. It is also known as Cow Lily and is an important food source for wildlife such as muskrat, beaver, deer as well as waterfowl.

Note: It really helps when you ask for an ID of a plant to give more information. What are the leaves like? Size of leaves and flowers? How deep is the water where it grows? And of course, always relevant is location.

Without some relevant information, it can be a hit-and-miss game trying to guess what it is. Another photo of the leaves would be helpful. It looks like there is something of the same colour on the left which is only partially seen in the picture. Was there more than one bloom of this colour in the area?
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: basenjimom on September 18, 2011, 02:08:20 PM
Looked at posters profile and found this link before I posted to verify.   http://des.nh.gov/organization/commissioner/pip/publications/wd/documents/wd-05-30.pdf   Hope this helps.  I'm sticking to Pitcher Plant flower.  LOL  (of course I'm probably wrong)  :ecsmile
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Blue on September 18, 2011, 02:48:13 PM
This is where more info would help basenjimom. Pitcher plants grow in boggy soil whereas the yellow waterlily (Spatterdock) can grow in fairly deep water - deep enough to kayak on.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on September 18, 2011, 05:07:38 PM
I thought I could see a little bit of a Pitcher Plant-type of leaf in the picture. I agree that it would help to see more of the foliage (looks like some sort of aquatic grass in there as well).

Basenjimom: The resource you gave is really interesting, and it helped me to identify lots of unknowns that I find around here. We're lakeside. so I recognized lots of them and now know the name and interesting facts about them!  I love the touch-me-not, and now I know it can be used to relieve poison ivy! Also I.D.'d the Horsetail"  that grows into all of our flower beds!

Here's a picture of our Touch-Me-Not (now I know its real name is Jewelweed). It's fun for the kids, because the seeds explode when touched in the late summer (Now!)

(http://i1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/September%20Garden%202011/Sept72011079.jpg)
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: jungleland on September 18, 2011, 06:01:24 PM
Thank-you everyone for being so resourceful!  You are right Blue more info would have been helpful.  The were several flowers in clumps of water grass near the edge of the pond so the water was not too deep. There were lots of water lilies nearby too. The beginning of the pond was kind of swampy and shallow. I did not get the foliage.  I zoomed in on the interesting flower.  Looking at the resources posted I do think it matches the Pitcher Plant.  I had never heard of that before.  It is carnivorous!  Basenjimom thank-you for finding that link!  I plan to bookmark if for future reference.  Faeri Gardner have you used the touch-me not flower for poison ivy?  Interesting and pretty!  Here is the only other pic I have from that day, a side view.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-TkFX230AiDM/TnaReLF71OI/AAAAAAAAAs4/cpkRSy72I78/s512/DSCN2108.JPG)
 :ty  Jungleland
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: madrona on September 19, 2011, 01:37:26 AM
I found these Pitcher Plant images on line:

http://digbyphoto.com/gallery/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=189 - Newfoundland's Provincial Flower
(http://digbyphoto.com/gallery/images/Pitcher%20Plant%20Blossom.jpg) (http://)

http://www.nativeorchid.org/news200602.htm - Plant of the Month (bottom of the page) (Sarracenia purpurea) with some interesting information.
(http://www.nativeorchid.org/PitcherPlant-Flower-982124A_rrSCB350.jpg) (http://)

http://blog.visitcranelake.com/my-favorite/
(http://visitcranelake.com/images/blog/Pitcher%20Plant%20Flower%207-17.jpg) (http://)

Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on September 19, 2011, 08:38:26 AM
Jungleland, No, I haven't tried the Touch-Me-Not trick for Poison Ivy but now I am definitely going to remember that one! We have so much Jewelweed, but fortunately have not had Poison Ivy in our woods.

One thing we did see in my former home in southeastern Wisconsin was an invasive species called Garlic Mustard. I seem to be really allergic to it, and I have a Poison Ivy-type of reaction to it. I'll have to see if I can bottle the Touch-Me-Not for future visits there!
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Tigerlady105 on September 19, 2011, 01:43:12 PM
Madrona, thank you for finding and posting the images for our comparison.  That really is helpful!   :thumbup:
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: madrona on March 14, 2013, 10:42:34 AM
A sure sign of Spring on Vancouver Island is this bright, but smelly plant.

(http://i.imgur.com/tBgTxmn.jpg)

It is, maybe appropriately, named Skunk Cabbage!  It has a certain odor to it!   :eceek

On a drive around the neigbourhood yesterday, I took this photo of a water-filled ditch, where Skunk Cabbage grows happily.

(http://i.imgur.com/aE6La37.jpg)

In fact, with the sounds of the water running into the ditch, I couldn't resist making a short video!  :biggrin3

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLHr7I-KheQ
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: birdvoyer on March 14, 2013, 08:51:23 PM
What a pretty flower to have an unpleasant odor (if I am translating the innuendo correctly).  There is nothing more soothing than a "babbling" brook/ditch.   :biggrin3  Nice madrona.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: fol-di-rol on March 14, 2013, 09:13:35 PM
Madrona!  thank you for the beautiful Skunk Cabbage pictures!  To me that means Spring is on the way (and I even like the smell of it, though I know some do not)!  
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: madrona on July 09, 2013, 05:46:41 PM
I spotted this unusual plant growing in our yard the other day.  I knew it was called 'Indian Pipe', but didn't know much about it. Upon doing a little research I read HERE (http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/indian_pipe.htm) that it is not a fungus, as many believe, but a plant that doesn’t have chlorophyll.  It is actually a parasite as it has a "mycorrhizal relationship" with nearby fungus and plants.

(http://i.imgur.com/fJdwt9J.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/ycgU4oW.jpg)

Here it is, in close up - quite beautiful, in a unique kind of way!  

(http://i.imgur.com/TFtaFIN.jpg)

Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: passerine on July 09, 2013, 06:21:26 PM
I seen some of those on Hornby, was quite excited about the find,  they really are pretty & unique.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: mishikeenhquay on July 09, 2013, 06:58:45 PM


Lovely Mad!!!
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on July 21, 2013, 05:29:07 AM
Those are such elegant plants! Wow, Thank you, Mad!
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: BBE on October 18, 2013, 12:10:52 AM
This is not flora native to my area, but I thought some of you might like to see the floral sculptures from this years exhibit at the Montreal Botanical Gardens.

Colourful, creative and the time needed to make them - wow

http://myvirtualgarden2.blogspot.ca/2013/09/mosaiculture-exhibition.html (http://myvirtualgarden2.blogspot.ca/2013/09/mosaiculture-exhibition.html)
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: linused on October 18, 2013, 12:31:55 AM
BBE That was fun to see the incredible imagination and beauty of all those floral sculptures. Wow indeed.  :eceek        Mad,  I see those Indian Pipes around my home. I always look for them and they seem to appear suddenly.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: birdvoyer on October 18, 2013, 06:05:07 AM
BBE, thanks for sharing this. It is amazing! And beautiful too. People can be so talented. Each display was so artistic and just to think of the time it takes to create those works of art...mind boggling! I especially liked the Bird Tree.     :thumbup:
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Rajame on October 18, 2013, 07:42:25 AM
Thank you BBE! That is just fantastic! I am in awe!
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: passerine on October 18, 2013, 08:13:13 AM
This is not flora native to my area, but I thought some of you might like to see the floral sculptures from this years exhibit at the Montreal Botanical Gardens.

Colourful, creative and the time needed to make them - wow

http://myvirtualgarden2.blogspot.ca/2013/09/mosaiculture-exhibition.html (http://myvirtualgarden2.blogspot.ca/2013/09/mosaiculture-exhibition.html)


Amazing, lots of talent went into those.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on October 18, 2013, 02:33:49 PM
                  WOW!
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: jungleland on October 18, 2013, 07:44:29 PM
Those were amazing BBE!  Thanks for sharing.   :ecsmile
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: eagle63 on June 01, 2014, 05:26:02 PM
Hey Folks,

As many of you know I went on a trip this past week. I finally got all the pics picked out and put in my flickr account.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/11681557@N05/ (http://www.flickr.com/photos/11681557@N05/)


First went to the Toronto Zoo. This is a White Lion:

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5560/14321083861_e61f340aaa.jpg)


Then I saw my 217th Life Bird, the Sandhill Crane:

(https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2899/14322621862_d0abe3964d.jpg)


I haven`t seen a loon in years:

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5193/14344596063_6cfef2263d.jpg)

Go have a look and if you like a photo leave a comment !
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: linused on June 02, 2014, 12:45:41 AM
Wow Eagle   what a great trip you had. Thanks for sharing your fantastic photos, amazing animals. Your new kitty is a sweetheart,, have you decided on a name for her?
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: eagle63 on June 02, 2014, 06:04:25 PM
Her name is Sky and always will be
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on August 20, 2014, 03:26:30 PM
The Prairies in the Midwest are just glorious this time of year!  Today we traveled to a nature center a few hours away to hike and see what's in bloom. Here are some of the things we saw:
Lots of bees

                 (http://i1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/Mosquito%20Hill%20%20New%20London%20WI%20%20%208%2020%202014/IMG_0588_zps63247a3b.jpg) (http://s1021.photobucket.com/user/DarciJ751/media/Mosquito%20Hill%20%20New%20London%20WI%20%20%208%2020%202014/IMG_0588_zps63247a3b.jpg.html)

Lots of flowers, tons of color

                  (http://i1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/Mosquito%20Hill%20%20New%20London%20WI%20%20%208%2020%202014/IMG_0585_zps7a6fb6e3.jpg) (http://s1021.photobucket.com/user/DarciJ751/media/Mosquito%20Hill%20%20New%20London%20WI%20%20%208%2020%202014/IMG_0585_zps7a6fb6e3.jpg.html)

Lots of native GRASSES, GOLDENROD, COREOPSIS, CONEFLOWERS AND (MY FAVORITE):  Rattlesnake Master!
You can read more about it here:   http://wimastergardener.org/?q=RattlesnakeMaster (http://wimastergardener.org/?q=RattlesnakeMaster) 
It's the spiny looking white globe on a tall stalk in the center of this picture:

                   (http://i1021.photobucket.com/albums/af334/DarciJ751/Mosquito%20Hill%20%20New%20London%20WI%20%20%208%2020%202014/IMG_20140820_114626_zpsfb3fbe46.jpg) (http://s1021.photobucket.com/user/DarciJ751/media/Mosquito%20Hill%20%20New%20London%20WI%20%20%208%2020%202014/IMG_20140820_114626_zpsfb3fbe46.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: linused on October 27, 2014, 02:05:11 AM
(http://i1280.photobucket.com/albums/a499/oyster3/DSC_6231_zps06c0edd1.jpg)

(http://i1280.photobucket.com/albums/a499/oyster3/DSC_6227_zps4fad9119.jpg)

(http://i1280.photobucket.com/albums/a499/oyster3/DSC_6226_zpsc344b042.jpg)

I scrolled back the chat last nite and found the interesting conversation about squirrels eating mushrooms. So I went into my albums of photos I took while I was in Alberta in August and found some photos I took for Jon.  While we were walking in a beautiful forest of birches and bush I noticed mushrooms stuffed into nooks of trees. Turns out squirrels stuff them there for winter. Pretty good harvest too.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Cawatcher on October 27, 2014, 05:33:31 AM
 :eceek Wow thank you linuse. Who would have ever thought?  :eclove
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: boodle317 on April 06, 2015, 06:16:39 PM

This 3200 Year Old Tree Is So Huge It's Never Been Captured In A Single Image... Until Now.  "The President" is one of those trees. The giant sequoia stands 247 feet tall, measures 45,000 cubic feet in volume, and is an estimated 3,200 years old.  The trunk is 27 feet wide and the his mighty branches hold 2 billion needles, the most of any tree on the planet.  On top of that, he still adds one cubic meter of wood per year - making him one of the fastest growing trees in the world.  Giant sequoias exist in only one place, where The President and smaller trees that make up his "House" and "Senate", reside.   On the western slope of the Sierra Nevada's in California, at 5000-8000 ft above sea level.  Until now, the tree had never been photographed in its entirety. It took an intricate set of pulleys and levers to scale the tree, which some argue is the largest in the world (taking width into account).  After 32 days and stitching together 126 separate photos, we are left with this breathtaking portrait of The President.  Absolutely incredible. To see how it was done, check out this video:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNCH6uhB_Bs

Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: linused on April 06, 2015, 07:47:04 PM
Thank you Boodle,   I have seen that photo and enjoyed seeing how it was composed.   What an amazing tree.
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Rajame on April 06, 2015, 08:22:58 PM
Incredible! Thank you Boodle!
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Faerie Gardener on April 07, 2015, 03:57:55 PM
That is amazing, Boodle!  Thank you. I would love to see him in "person." 
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: amazedbyeagles on April 07, 2015, 05:07:47 PM
Thank you for that amazing video!  Gorgeous in the snow!  It really shows the scale when you notice the humans hanging on ropes beside it's huge mammoth trunk!  Thanks for sharing!  :eclove
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: OpieK on April 07, 2015, 05:13:22 PM
Wow!!!
Title: Re: Flora Native to Your Area
Post by: Tigerlady105 on April 16, 2015, 01:01:49 AM
Boodle, thank you for posting the video of that magnificent and venerable tree!  When I was a child (in the Olden Days), I was fortunate to stand at its huge base and look way up.   :heart