HEGPS - Our Nature Zone

Ways To Help Wildlife => Everyone Can Help => Topic started by: emc on August 05, 2010, 08:31:58 PM

Title: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: emc on August 05, 2010, 08:31:58 PM
We live in So. California and have a lot of hummingbirds, butterflies, and other birds.  I have always enjoyed watching the birds.  So we added plants that
make our yard bird friendly.  Some of our plants that are enjoyed by the hummingbirds are:
hibiscus
bottlebrush
trumpet vines
purple salvia
There are others , which I'll have to look up.
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Mary Jane on August 05, 2010, 09:38:50 PM
We have a lot of "fox glove" out here - I think the hummingbirds enjoy that too?  Am I right? 

My hubby and I bought some acreage right after it was logged.  It is quite a project to repair the land and try to make it wildlife friendly and also to carve out an area for us to live and enjoy.  I would love to hear more from everyone - suggestions, stories of what you have done or maybe your neighbors. 

We have wetlands and a buffer area on our land - which means a protected area for nature and wildlife.  Learning how to protect this precious land and attract more wildlife is our goal - and we look forward to learning from all of you.

Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Tigerlady105 on August 05, 2010, 09:46:26 PM
Mary Jane, that's a wonderful, life-long project.  It'll be fun for us to watch with you as different areas begin to take shape! 

Will you plant some fruit trees, for your family and the animals?  I saw some apples that had fallen off a tree and were scattered all over the ground when I visited in Washington State one October.  As we drove by, I wondered where the deer were and thought how much they would enjoy the fruit.  Sure enough, the next afternoon, about 8-10 were busy feasting on the apples on the ground.   :eclove
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: emc on August 05, 2010, 10:52:56 PM
I haven't looked up the names of all the other flowers and plants that the birds like yet. But forgot to mention that we have Hooded Orioles, which nest across the street, in a palm tree.  They love the bottlebrush especially.  We have 1 hummingbird feeder in the front yard, and 1 in the back yard, along with a bigger one made just for Orioles. Even with all of our plants, they like the feeders too.  (I tell them, it is supplementary,not sure if they listen)  I never use dye or bought nectar, but make it 1/4 cup sugar to 1 Cup boling water. Mix till dissolved, and then cool before using. I'm  mixing up 4 Cups at a time lately. 
One reason we're going thru the feeder more is a misunderstanding with the gardner. (mow, blow, and go) He noticed that the bottlebrush had slowed blooming and suggested he top it.  I looked at it and said fine.  Hmmm he trimmed the whole thing. Top, and all sides!   Yikes!  I was upset, the birds I'm sure were and are, but you can't put limbs back on. So, I'm trying to be more diligent with the feeders.  I've noticed 3 or 4 Orioles at a time at the feeder lately.  Mom, Dad, and two different stages of immatures, if I'm not mistaken.
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: emc on August 05, 2010, 10:54:28 PM
I was surprised to find out that deer would eat apples. One of our members told us a year or two ago.  Glad they found them. :)
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: luvthebirds on August 05, 2010, 11:25:50 PM
The deer in our yard LOVE apples!  One of my first times getting to know them was watching a couple stretch way up on their hind legs to get them off the tree.  (That and watching them lick the seed out of the bird feeder.  Until we saw them, we just thought we had some really hungry birds.   :eclol)
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Tigerlady105 on August 06, 2010, 01:53:23 AM
Raptorman said that he enjoys having deer come to his backyard to eat the apples.  One of the first puzzles here in our puzzles thread is a picture he took of a deer with an apple in its mouth.   :ecsmile

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4059/4297420514_32b34c096a_m.jpg)
2010 Raptorman

I leave my bottlebrush alone to grow until it gets much too big, because a number of birds like it.  I've been meaning to find out what part they are eating. Does anyone know?  

We used to have a large red hibiscus, but finally it got too old and died...a real loss. Another thing some of the birds like is the red bougainvillea.  It blooms its head off and makes quite a show...can't miss seeing it.  

The fruitless mulberry (big tree) is popular with the neighborhood squirrels.  They love the brand new leaf buds as they just begin to unfurl.  The squirrels are very entertaining as they do acrobatic stunts to get to the very ends of the new branches to eat just the right buds.  After checking around, I discovered that they get protein from the leaf buds at the ends of the branches.  I'd like to find out more about how and why more protein is available there...  :puzzled2

Red seems to be a color that attracts attention and says, "Here I am."  Pyracantha grows up a wall and onto the neighbor's garage roof.  It's out of the way and we leave it alone so there will be plenty of the bright red berries available for the animals and birds that use it as a source of food.

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2138/2217940243_08f1645bf5_m.jpg)
2010 Tigerlady105

And finally, the squirrels help themselves to some of our very sweet navel oranges...the best I've ever tasted. The oranges ripen right at Christmas and most are left on the tree for any animals who want them.  They aren't greedy and there are always enough for our family, too.   :ecsmile

It doesn't take much to make sources of food available, by planting things that are nice in the landscape and also provide food and shelter for many living things.   :heart

Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: emc on August 06, 2010, 06:30:38 AM
Bottlebrush flowers have a nectar that the hummers, bees, and orioles love.  it gives good shelter to many birds, and perhaps the little nodules left when the flower quits blooming is eaten.  Need to research that somehow.
The pyracantha berries are eaten by robins, mockingbirds, and waxwings.
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Tigerlady105 on August 06, 2010, 10:46:37 AM
Thanks, Emc!  I'm glad that it's possible to provide food and shelter for a variety of birds and bees.  The bees like rosemary, too.  It's easy to grow in a Mediterranean climate and is drought resistant, once it gets established.  :ecsmile
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: luvthebirds on August 06, 2010, 11:16:57 AM
The lesser goldfinches also enjoy the rosemary!  In January we see the bees come out for the Rosemary in bloom along with the lesser goldfinches. Nature is so clever, the bees get the nectar and then the goldfinches get the seed. :biggrin6. I have also seen house finches and possibly white crown sparrows and towhees in the rosemary. 
 :eclol I had to jump up during this post as I spotted some quail on the patio (we are in the desert now).  They had left the patio, but we got to see a couple of families parading through the yard and looking adorable.  We counted at least 22, but there may have been more.  We had a little earthquake a while ago, maybe it woke them up!

Btw, I am enjoying this thread.  :nod2
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: emc on August 06, 2010, 11:48:43 AM
Looks like I need to find a spot for some Rosemary  :ecsmile
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: passerine on August 06, 2010, 06:31:56 PM
MJ i'm not sure of the nectar content for the foxgloves, they are the shape hummers seem to like & there beautiful, pretty sure some birds or insects would enjoy them.

Would love to see some pics of the birds you ladies are talking about. :nod2
 
Do they prefer one rosemary plant over another?

Love the pic of the deer eating the apple. Tigger your Pyracantha would make a good puzzle, hint, hint. :ecinnocent
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: passerine on August 06, 2010, 06:54:44 PM
The last place i lived had a sliding patio window/door, the birds were seeing reflection of trees & flying into them. The Varied Thrush were real bad as they seen themselves, thinking there was rivalries they would fly full force, not pretty. :ecsad

Through trial & error i came up with some solutions one was to string, shells, beads, feathers etc with fishing line & hang them in front of the windows to break the reflection it worked good.

(http://img444.imageshack.us/img444/8528/20080403okay0019fx2.jpg)

Not the best picture but you get the idea.

I also collect pretty much anything i can string & hang, miniature bird houses things with the sucker pads to stick right on windows etc.

(http://img541.imageshack.us/img541/9130/misc070.jpg)

At some bird stores you can also get stencils & reflective stencil for the exterior of windows. There's the darker bird ones as below & you can get clear ones that don't block your view but the being the birds can see up to 12 times what we can they see the ultraviolet light reflects off the stencil. Two samples below, hard to see the hummingbird but i guess that's the idea we don't see it but the bird does. :mhihi

(http://img217.imageshack.us/img217/6619/misc072.jpg)XXX(http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/5760/misc071.jpg)
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: emc on August 06, 2010, 07:15:12 PM
Some good ideas there, passerine, some birds just continue to go for the reflections. :(  We have to be smarter, and help them.  :nod2
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Tigerlady105 on August 06, 2010, 08:30:16 PM

Do they prefer one rosemary plant over another?

Love the pic of the deer eating the apple. Tigger your Pyracantha would make a good puzzle, hint, hint. :ecinnocent

I don't know the answer to your question about which rosemary birds prefer, if any.  :puzzled2

 Here you go, Passerine...Already had that puzzle up my sleeve!   :chuckle

http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=135.msg22108#msg22108
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: luvthebirds on August 06, 2010, 09:15:19 PM
Passerine:  I only have seen upright or trailing rosemary.  We have the trailing, I believe.  It flowers in January where we are in Northern California and that is when it gets the most "action".  I think it actually blooms several times a year, but have not really kept track.  Both the upright and trailing rosemary we see in our area have blue flowers.  I would guess that either variety would appeal tom the birds.

And you can use the Rosemary in your kitchen, too!
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Tigerlady105 on August 06, 2010, 10:11:05 PM
I had the upright rosemary (before the gardener killed it   :eccry  ).  The flavor is too strong for me, but the bees really like the blue flowers here in So. California, too.   :ecsmile  Rosemary can take full sun and rather warm and dry conditions, although it does like a drink of water at times.
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: dalarie on August 07, 2010, 11:42:04 AM
Around here (Alberta) the rufous hummingbirds go crazy for honeysuckle vines.
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: emc on August 15, 2010, 04:02:45 PM
I went to the local beach yesterday with family visiting from out of town.  I took along my dog on a leash and a plastic bag in case I needed it for his waste.  

We all loved the beach, dog included.  As I was walking along, I saw a plastic cup, another one, a beer can, and some trash.  I took the plastic bag out of my pocket and picked up the trash, using the bag.  I filled up that bag with trash, plus what I could hold in my hand, picking up more litter as I went. Found a pair of socks.  :eceek  
Ended up taking those items to a trash bin and filling the bag up again with litter. I didn't end up needing it for the intended purpose, but it felt good to clean up this little area at least.  :ecsmile

I'm going to try and remember to take a grocery size plastic bag with me on all of my walks.  :nod2
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Rajame on August 15, 2010, 06:50:39 PM
emc,

Thank you for the reminder. I can do that too!

Hugs,
Rajame  :heart
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Tigerlady105 on August 28, 2010, 09:25:29 AM
This is a site that has suggestions for what we can do at home to encourage and help wildlife do well in our backyards/property:

Encouraging Wildlife...

Feeding and Habitat. etc.

http://www.cwrc.net/encouraging_wildlife.shtml
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: typoscount2 on August 28, 2010, 10:37:12 AM
i have hummingbird feeders, and i live on a sand dune or so it seems, the soil here mostly sand, so have ants of many descriptions.
ants love hummingbird feeders. i was lucky enough to find a feeder that had perches and no yellow to bring the wasps close in great numbers , that also had an attached ant moat.
since then i have looked into these ant moats as they really do keep the ants from being in the feeder syrup.
you can buy these moats seperate , not built into feeders as well. but i did find a site that tells how to make your own.
there are several benifits to these moats,
1. being they keep ants from pesting the hummers, but also ants in the juice contaminate it.
2. the common suggestions of using taggle foot , oils  and vasline type methods are quite hazzardous to the humming bird them selves. thier bodys contact this stuff and feather feet and bills are often damaged.
and
3. my little chickadees come stand on the edge of the moats to drink

this is a link to an instruction on how to make a ant moat

it just suggests glue, but as the chickadees use the water to drink i would make sure the plastic item used for the moat is not releasing contaminates from its previous life, and that the glue also be an non toxic type like hot gun glue maybe

http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf548947.tip.html (http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf548947.tip.html)

 :thumbup:
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: emc on August 28, 2010, 01:19:24 PM
The link shows an easy way to make an ant moat. Thanks.

I'd love to see a picture of the feeder you found and even if you could of the chickadees drinking from the moat.

 :eclove
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: typoscount2 on August 28, 2010, 06:55:27 PM
EMC  ;  )
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k183/4muddypaws/temp/1stNewCamPics007-1.jpg) (http://) (http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k183/4muddypaws/temp/1stNewCamPics038-1.jpg) (http://)  this is the feeder and second one shows the chickadee sitting at the water moat.  they are fast little birds and i have yet to get a good clear pic of one drinking
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: emc on August 28, 2010, 07:16:06 PM
That's a nice feeder, Typos. Very nice having the moat attached.  Thanks for the pics, and the chickadee too. :eclove
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: typoscount2 on August 30, 2010, 07:57:56 AM
i had posted a link to an article about a rehab in nova scotia , along with that article was the link to the rehabs website, tigerlady found a garden /habitat page on that site and this is the link to her post , with the link to the suggestions for gardens

http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=192.msg25039#msg25039 (http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=192.msg25039#msg25039)

this is the link to the cobequid wildlife rehabilitation center , encouraging wild life page
http://www.cwrc.net/encouraging_wildlife.shtml (http://www.cwrc.net/encouraging_wildlife.shtml)
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Tigerlady105 on September 02, 2010, 07:48:50 PM
In my wanderings around various nature-related topics on the Internet, this page came up about "Fruit Trees to Plant for a Deer."  It discuss the varieties of apples that deer like and how to help deer get the nutrients they need:     :eclove

http://www.ehow.com/list_6165628_fruit-trees-plant-deer.html    
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: beans on September 12, 2010, 10:35:32 AM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Conservation%20and%20Preservation/urbandeer.jpg)
urban deer on a neighborhood street

A few months ago we had an officer from California Department of Fish and Game come to a large neighborhood meeting to discuss the deer problem.  One young woman in the audience had been walking her dog and said she was chased by a deer.  This was during daylight hours, in a residential neighborhood.  She wanted the deer put down.  The officer, one of only two in a very large county, said the woman would need a depredation permit.  These permits are issued to allow the taking of wildlife which are causing serious damage to public or private property or pose a health or safety hazard. 

A better solution is for neighbors to educate themselves about wildlife in the area.  To keep them away, one should NOT feed the deer.  As they become habituated to humans, they lose their fear.  When they lose their fear, some view humans as competition for food or territory and may attack them. 

It's a sad story for habituated animals.  They may end up being hurt by people who see them as a nuisance or they may be put down.  Deer in the street can be hit by a car.  An injured deer cannot be taken to a wildlife hospital and must be euthanized.  A dead deer may have fawns, who probably won't survive without their mother.

There is even a newspaper story about this event:  CLICK HERE (http://www.dailycal.org/article/109797/city_hopes_to_address_urban_deer_attacks)
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Donnae on October 16, 2010, 11:33:32 PM
In the News... 24 Weekend Paper.. Friday-Sunday Oct 1-3m 2010.. Article by Bruce Kirkland OMI Agency...."David Suzuki Still Has Hope"

It is remarkable, because most enviromnentalists routinely issue doomsday warnings about the health of Planet Earth, that David Suzuki maintains a sense of awe, wonder and hope.
"If you don't have hope:, Canada's most famous and elopquent eco-activist tells OMI Agency "there is no point in doing it.
Doing it means educating the public about enviromental issues in his lectures, books, and on television, including the long-running series, The Nature of Things.
Doing it also means participating in Sturia Gunnarsson's marvellous new documentary, Force of Nature, The David Suzuki Movie.
It is a personal portrait of Suzuki, but also a vehicle for Suzuki to deliver excerpts of a landmark lecture at the University of British Columbia.
Suzuki says he recognizes that many eco-activists "really feel it's too late--that we are past tipping points."
But his message, included in Force of Nature, is more hopeful. "One of my messages is--We're so ignorant that we have no idea how it all works. And, if we're that ignorant, how can anyone say it's too late? We have no idea how encouraging or generous that nature can be. "I just use as an example. Last year we had the most devastating run of sockeye in history on the Fraser River ( in Suzuki's native British Columbia where he still lives).

The government set up a commission saying: What happened to the sockeye? The next year (2010 ) we have the biggest run of sockeye in the last 100 years. We're going , "What the ----? We have no idea. Nobody knows what is going on.
"But nature, I'm sure, has got a lot of surprises and I am hoping there will be a lot of generosity there. And that's what keeps me going.
"I can see as a scientist that we are undercutting so much of the planet that keeps us alive.
"But the hope is that there is still enough there and we"re in for a lot of surprises--some good."
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Donnae on October 17, 2010, 12:09:26 AM
Also in the same paper... same date --- Bruce Kirkland OMI Agency.. Movie review

Sturla Gunnarsson's " Force of Nature: The David Suzuki Movie is both a marvellous biography of a Canadian icon and an entertaining and enlightening documentary about biodiversity.
Every child in Canada--- and the world--- should be given the opportunity to see it. Then they can bug their stodgy or ignorant or reluctant parents into changing their family's wasteful ways and help save Planet Earth from further degradation and perhaps even total destruction. Environmentalism begins at home.
But Gunnarsson, like the world-renowned environmentalist and scientist he profiles, realizes that you cannot just say stuff like that-- you have to show it.
Force of Nature shows it as beautifully and as forcefully as possible in any single documentary film. It is broader in scope, less alarmist and better balanced and ochestrated than David Guggenheim and Al Gore's influential doc "An Inconvenient Truth."
With this balance, "Force of Nature is much less likely to be a target of ridicule from nay-sayers- as An Inconvenient Truth" has become for some of it's sloppy reportage, which side-tracked people from the validity of its message about climate change.
Force of Nature is also full of inconvenient truths about the deteriorating health of Mother Nature and mankind's responsibility in those processes. But the spirit and tone of the new film is less about panic and more about hope. And a lot more personal.

The film chronicles Suzuki's life, starting from what was initially a happy Canadian childhoold after his birth to Japanese-Canadian parents in Vancouver in 1936. Then came the tortured period when, with his family, he was forced into one of Canada's shameful interment camps during the Second World War. It continues through the post-war banishment to Ontario, through his education and development as both a scientist and as a broadcaster, through his emergence as an activist, and up to his current twilight years as a doting grandfather and celebrity environmentalist.
Gunnarsson also gives Suzuki, who is an eloquent speaker, a platform to re-explain his whole earth message. One in which he explains in detail how maintaining the integrity of the planet's biodiversity is the key to survival for humans.
The film intercuts the personal episodes with excerpts from a public lecture that Suzuki delivered in the fall of 2009 at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. That sounds easy to do, but it is not.
Gunnarsson and his filmmaking team do a splendid job of maintaining a flow. Spend too long on the personal and the lecture would falter. Spend too much time just letting Suzuki talk and the personal picture would fade. Force of Nature does it just right, keeping both sagas alive.


Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Tigerlady105 on December 15, 2010, 11:14:10 AM
Please be sure to take a look at this great apple feeder that is posted on flickr!   :thumbup:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/peregrinebirdphoto/5263832504/in/contacts/   
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: cakiepie on January 08, 2011, 01:13:33 PM


I wasn't sure where to post this question but I settled on here.

Can anyone recommend a good birder magazine(s)?

Thanks! :ecsmile
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Blue on January 14, 2011, 11:28:27 PM
cakiepie

I don't know of a good one that is available on magazine stands in Canada. Birds and Blooms is not always too accurate as the content is submitted by subscribers but it can contain some interesting pictures and information.
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: passerine on January 14, 2011, 11:54:55 PM
I used to subscribe to Birders World, I enjoyed it. Tho not sure of accuracy either but lots of info & pictures. Good birding spots & festivals info.
http://tinyurl.com/4fvb27q
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: cakiepie on January 15, 2011, 07:43:27 AM
Thank you Blue and Passerine...since coming to the "nest" and seeing photos submitted by folks and talking about birds, I have become very interested in learning more and being able to identify species that I come upon.  I have requested a "decent' pair of binoculars for my birthday..lol.  I did see a subsciption for Birders World and think I will start there. And I have also learned at Hornby..don't always believe what you hear and read!!  So check in with the "nest" before passing along any info read, unless of course it is Doug's book, which I did receive for Christmas this year   :biggrin3

Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: birdvoyer on January 15, 2011, 07:54:25 AM
Cakiepie, you may want to check out the National Audubon Society website. As a member, you would receive a monthly publication. But there is tons of info there and links to areas for bird ID and such. Check out Audubon here

http://www.audubon.org/

And this is a direct link to how to join.

http://support.audubon.org/

And their online magazine

http://audubonmagazine.org/
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: cakiepie on January 16, 2011, 05:58:04 AM
Oh Bird...thank you so much.  I certainly will check these out!    :heart
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: birdvoyer on January 16, 2011, 02:18:02 PM
You are very welcome cakiepie.  :ecsmile  Decided to join myself while I was checking it out!  :biggrin3
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: marjy2u on January 22, 2011, 11:40:53 PM
Oh dear ... another cam there at Audubon!!
They have a barn owl that is now sitting on 7 eggs!!!

http://www.starrranch.org/blog/?page_id=2&cpage=1116#comments

Seems there are cams everywhere all of a sudden!
(... or maybe I just never looked before.)
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: Tigerlady105 on January 23, 2011, 01:26:06 AM
Marjy2u, thank you for the link to the Starr Ranch cam.  It's been awhile since I've checked on the owls and I just saw Mrs. Owl turning some of her seven eggs.  She's a good mom!   :eclove
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: birdvoyer on January 23, 2011, 07:41:36 AM
Hi Marjy2u, it is mind boggling how many cams there are these days. Thanks for the reminder that I need to check in there.  :eclove

 Have you had an opportunity to check out the Wildlife cams topic here in the forum? http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?board=17.0 The Starr Ranch Barn Owl cam (http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?board=17.0) is posted there as well as several more that others have found. I find it makes it really easy to find live cams that others mention in the chat.  
 :nod2
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: winterwren on May 16, 2012, 04:38:04 PM
My daughter sent me this link to a recent Audubon newsletter.

http://ca.audubon.org/newsroom/press-releases/2012/open-vertical-pipes-are-death-traps-birds-and-other-wildlife (http://ca.audubon.org/newsroom/press-releases/2012/open-vertical-pipes-are-death-traps-birds-and-other-wildlife)

The article reads, in part:
"Audubon California is warning landowners about the dangers of open vertical pipes to wildlife on public and private properties. Exposed pipes which can take the form of sign posts, irrigation vents, unused chimneys and survey markers are particularly hazardous for small cavity-nesting birds that either fall into these openings, or enter looking for nesting space. Once inside, birds are unable to open their wings to fly out, and the smooth sides make it impossible to climb out. Inevitably, the birds suffer a miserable, unnecessary death from starvation and exposure. It is estimated that many thousands of birds die suffer this fate every year."

I checked my property... I have a few tubular fence posts, but they're all capped. I did have an uncapped septic vent above my bathroom, so today I went up on the roof and covered it with a piece of nylon mesh (they kind you use for window screens). A piece of wire around the top of the pipe holds the mesh securely in place.

This took all of five minutes. Well worth the time.
Title: Re: Share Your Nature Tips
Post by: boodle317 on May 16, 2012, 05:07:04 PM
Thank you Wren. Good tip.