HEGPS - Our Nature Zone

Ways To Help Wildlife => Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation => Topic started by: beans on January 16, 2010, 01:43:15 PM

Title: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on January 16, 2010, 01:43:15 PM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/Lindsaylogo.gif)

Lindsay Wildlife Museum (http://www.wildlife-museum.org/)

This morning I took my first class at Lindsay Wildlife Museum.  Lindsay has a wildlife hospital, where they accept birds, mammals, reptiles, etc.   I have transferred birds from IBRRC to Lindsay and have also picked up aquatic birds from Lindsay to bring to IBRRC for rehabilitation.

The volunteer shifts are only three hours, and volunteers sign up for one shift a week.  The shifts at IBRRC are four hours, but I usually work six or seven hours.  My longest shift was eleven hours.

I've signed up for the Wildlife Hospital Core Curriculum series taught on Saturdays fro 9 - 1.   There are four classes.  The series is also offered on Tuesday evenings.

My first class will probably be February 13, and I'll describe them here.  
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 16, 2010, 01:52:45 PM
Lindsay is very different from IBRRC.  Lindsay has a museum, education birds, and activities for the public. 

IBRRC is strictly a hospital with no public activities. 

Neither Lindsay nor IBRRC allow the public inside the hospital.  Both have a reception area where the public can bring injured or sick wildlife.

Why not let the public see the hospital?  Wildlife is terrified of humans!  Humans, with their eyes on the front of their faces, are perceived as predators!  Even the human voice is feared by wildlife.  Talking around wildlife can cause

* heart rate to spike
* depress the immune system
* slow down recovery

Unlike domestic pets, wildlife cannot be cuddled or soothed by humans.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 16, 2010, 02:08:01 PM
Like IBRRC, Lindsay's busy season begins in spring.  Many orphaned or abandoned baby animals will be brought to both hospitals. 

Parents can do a far better job of raising their babies than we can, with all of our training and veterinary assistance.  So when one sees an "abandoned" baby, one should leave and give the mother a chance to retrieve her little one.  A mother doe, for example, hides her fawn(s) while she goes off to explore and eat.  A mother duck is probably hiding close by while her babies seem to be on their own.  Neither mother will come back as long as a human is hanging around. 
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 16, 2010, 02:11:24 PM
Here's a story I found on the Lindsay website --

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/marmot1.jpg)

In June 2009, the wildlife hospital received a yellow-bellied marmot, one of the largest and most unusual rodents ever received in the hospital. It was an immature female that made the journey from near Pinecrest in the engine compartment of a Dodge Ram pickup truck. The truck had been parked at the Crabtree trailhead at the entrance to the Emigrant Wilderness and the marmot must have thought she had found a good place to hide. We occasionally receive rodents such as deer mice and chipmunks from remote areas of California, but the marmot was by far the largest.

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/Marmot2.jpg)

The marmot had abrasions on her chin and a partially skinned toe. She also had fleas, which is common in wildlife. She was anesthetized to clean her wounds and administer fluids and vitamins subcutaneously. She was powdered and given an injection for fleas. After recovery she was placed in a stainless steel cage heated by a large heating pad and was given food and water.

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/Marmot3.jpg)

She didn’t eat much the first night—just a little kale and parsley—so the second day she was syringe-fed mixed vegetable baby food, which she ate well. She was quite BAR (bright, alert and responsive) and managed to escape her cage several times while in the hospital. She was offered a different variety of food the second night but still didn’t eat much more than a few flowers. On the third day an examination showed her wounds were healing well and it was decided she should be released back in her home territory as soon as possible. A volunteer who has a cabin in the area where the marmot came from returned to the trailhead and released the wayward marmot back to her home.


Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: BBE on January 16, 2010, 04:50:33 PM
beans, that is so cool. And you will be taking the course - that is great. So will you still volunteer at the current centre and at Lindsay too?
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 16, 2010, 05:11:15 PM
I'll volunteer at both places--
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on January 16, 2010, 05:41:31 PM
Beans, this is so interesting.  I'm looking forward to more...thank you for sharing this with us.   :ecsmile
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: luvthebirds on January 16, 2010, 07:11:02 PM
Beans, thanks for the information.  I hope that you will enjoy your classes.  About 20 years ago I took the docent training at Lindsay which also entailed taking a biology (mammals as a recall) class and lab at DVC.  Unfortunately, things changed and although I completed the training, could not spend the time volunteering.  I did enjoy the training and getting to learn about animals.  I am glad the museum is still there and I am sure they will be very lucky to have you!  Good luck and keep us posted.  :ecsmile
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 17, 2010, 11:26:10 AM
Lindsay does not band the birds that it rehabilitates and releases.  The reason is that they don't have a permit to do so.  The US Fish and Wildlife Service has very strict rules for banding. 

For example, last week IBRRC had a small goose to release.  She looked like a mini version of a Canada Goose.  We thought she was a Cackling Goose, which was long considered just a small race of the Canada Goose. The smallest four of the eleven recognized races were recently determined to be distinct enough to be their own species. Cackling Goose includes the races known as Taverner's, Richardson's, Aleutian, and Cackling geese.  So we couldn't band her until she was correctly identified.  Was she an Aleutian or a Cackling Goose?  Our manager would have to check the database first.  What made us question the race is that the band assigned to a Cackling Goose wasn't quite large enough.  Ohmy, she was beautiful!  And she came in so thin two weeks again.  During her stay with us, she had gained roughly 2,000 grams!  She was strong, fully flighted, and her blood values looked good.  As I write this, I am thinking of her in the wild, for she was probably banded and released the next day.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 17, 2010, 11:34:29 AM
Lindsay has a number of "ambassador" or "education" animals.  Among them are several birds who have only one wing.  The ones I remember are the Turkey Vulture and the Bald Eagle.  The new rule* is that wildlife facilities can't keep one-winged birds.   One-winged birds need extra special care to exercise them properly, keep them from being bored, and to keep them healthy.  Many facilities don't have the expertise or the staff to do this.  These birds must be euthanized. The one-wings Lindsay now has have been grandfathered in and won't be "put to sleep."

I have mixed feelings about education animals at wildlife facilities.  This is not a natural life for them, even though they live much longer than the same species in the wild.  I wonder whether they long for the life they once had?  

On the other hand, they do teach the general public about wildlife and wildlife habitats.  And this may save the lives of animals in the wild.

Lindsay keeps only those animals which cannot survive in the wild.  For example, there is a beautiful Great Horned Owl who was illegally raised by a member of the public.  He is completely habituated to people, and was found in a park, begging people for food.  He'd walk or fly right up to them.  Or land on their heads!  And there are at least two raptors who are missing an eye.  They can't properly hunt for their food.

*This rule comes from US Fish and Wildlife Service and/or California Fish and Game.  Like IBRRC, Lindsay works under both permits.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: luvthebirds on January 17, 2010, 11:55:56 AM
Beans, Is "King Richard" the turkey vulture by any chance still living?  He was a very special ambassador at the Lindsey some time ago and very special to me as I once got to hold him.  :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: passerine on January 17, 2010, 12:24:43 PM
Like IBRRC, Lindsay's busy season begins in spring.  Many orphaned or abandoned baby animals will be brought to both hospitals. 

Parents can do a far better job of raising their babies than we can, with all of our training and veterinary assistance.  So when one sees an "abandoned" baby, one should leave and give the mother a chance to retrieve her little one.  A mother doe, for example, hides her fawn(s) while she goes off to explore and eat.  A mother duck is probably hiding close by while her babies seem to be on their own.  Neither mother will come back as long as a human is hanging around. 
This very good advice every Spring people thinking they're helping bring many young animals to rehab facilities it doesn't usually end well because as you say no one can replace the mother & if they don't have a place to return them & hope the mother is still near, if not it's a death sentence for many.   :eccry

Alway enjoy your posts beans.  :ecsmile
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 17, 2010, 12:39:09 PM
Luv, I believe there are two Turkey Vultures, but I don't know their names.  One has been there for 30 years?  I'm remembering all of this off the top of my head, so to speak, as I didn't take any notes on the tour.  I've been there many times, once with grandsons and family years ago, and more recently, simply to drop off and pick up birds at the hospital.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on February 21, 2010, 12:15:55 PM
I have started training at Lindsay Wildlife Museum (has an excellent wildlife hospital) so I could learn more about songbirds and other wildlife.

The Core Curriculum covers the following:

1.   Health and safety
2.   Policies, releasing animals
3.   Basic bird and mammal anatomy
4.   Charting and metrics
5.   Baby mammal care
6.   Baby bird care
7.   Expectations, slide show, how to get started
8.   Exam, paperwork, sign-up

Also, there was an Introduction class a few weeks ago.  The class cost $100, with $35 going to one year of membership at the Lindsay Wildlife Museum.  Each volunteer must be a member.

The training classes are taught every other Saturday, from 9 AM to 1 PM.   

The first day of training we were taught, among other things, how to take care of bird feeders. They should be emptied and washed once a week and then disinfected for 20 minutes in a 5% chlorine solution, rinsed, and allowed to air dry. The reason for this is that birds can carry diseases, and avian pox is insidious. A bird with avian pox which pokes its bill in the feeder can contaminate it. The next bird that comes along has a good chance of picking it up. Also, sick birds can spend more time at bird feeders, as they may be too ill or impaired to find their food in the wild. Hummingbird feeders should be cleaned twice a week. Never use the nectar sold in stores that contains red dye or preservatives.

I'll be volunteering at Lindsay and at IBRRC.  Lindsay has all wildlife, except marine mammals.  So much new information for me!

I also took a two hour seminar (on the web - it's a webinar) from the Oiled wildlife Care Network.  And I passed the exam, also on the net.  Both Lindsay & IBRRC, among others, are members of OWCN. http://www.owcn.org/

The more I learn, the more convinced I am that I know so little.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: passerine on February 21, 2010, 08:39:51 PM
Good for you beans, i'm envious i'm unable to join you...would love to do what you're doing. No facilities any where near me :sad but very happy for you & will live precariously through your experiences, thanks for sharing. :biggrin6
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on February 28, 2010, 11:44:42 AM
The constant hum of the machines kept me awake during those long days.  I shouted for my captors to release me but their mad rantings were unintelligible.  The worst part was the waiting.  Even now, the memory of those enormous hands clamping down on my throat and prying my mouth open makes m blood turn to ice.  If only I had never hit that window and met that orange tabby....

Excerpted from Memoirs of a House Finch

The training progresses, and yesterday we discussed the philosophy of handling.  Our goal is to reduce the stress of the animals we care for as much as possible with proper handling techniques.  Many of the animals are injured, unstable and easily stressed.  Unnecessary physical exertion can tip the balance toward delayed healing or even death.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on February 28, 2010, 11:48:00 AM
Much was said in this very special topic.  One thing stands out in my mind:  Keep an eye on how the animal is behaving.  Is he calm, bouncing around or near comatose?  Watch what he does as you approach.  Tr to anticipate his actions.  Knowing the general personalities of a species can help, but noting the actual personality of one's patient is even more valuable.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on February 28, 2010, 12:07:55 PM
I was glad to learn Lindsay also uses the metric system for weights and measures, as IBRRC does.  I know what 20 grams feels like (small duckling) and what 50 cc looks like.  Very accurate measurements and easy to remember.  

Reading the tiny markings on the 1 mL (1 cc) tuberculin (TB) syringe is a challenge for me, but with great concentration and good light I can do it.  These syringes are calibrated in hundredths.  Originally designed for the small dosages required for tuberculin skin testing, they are also widely used in a variety of sensitivity and allergy tests for people.  We use them at IBRRC for oral medication.

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/TuberculinSyringe-1.jpg)
TB syringe
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on February 28, 2010, 12:37:43 PM
We also discussed basic bird and mammal anatomy.  (I was glad to have the Manual of Ornithology and Handbook of Bird Biology at home.  I've gone through the entire manual but haven't finished the handbook.  Very good information here and a good reference.)

Here are some basics:

EXTERNAL COVERING

Birds:
skin (dry, inelastic, thin, loosely attached)
feathers
     no growth once fully formed
     purpose:  flight, insulation, display, nesting
     different types

Mammals:
skin and fur

SKELETAL SYSTEM

Birds:
bird bones are hollow (pneumatic bones)
breast muscles = 20% of body weight
some bones fused together, i.e., chest bones

Mammals:
denser bones, but baby animals have fragile bones
bones not fused; attached to each other with ligaments

RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

Birds:
No diaphragm
Have a more efficient respiratory system
air sac system - gas flows through lungs during inspiration and expiration
danger of suffocation - can suffocate if held too tightly

Mammals:
Have diaphragm

EXCRETION
Birds:
urine and feces combined before exiting
the ureters "milk" the semisolid urine down to the cloaca where it mixes with the feces
dangerous if vent (exit below cloaca) becomes clogged

Mammals:
urine and feces separate
dangerous if anus or opening of the urethra becomes clogged

Note:  only one bird excretes urine separately from feces.  Does anyone know which bird that is?
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: madrona on February 28, 2010, 02:01:56 PM
Ask ostrich?  Bet he knows!   :eclol
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on February 28, 2010, 02:26:19 PM
Yes, he should know 'cause it's an ostrich--  :ecwink
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Cawatcher on February 28, 2010, 06:36:33 PM
Congratulations bean You will have a great time ( I am Jealous) lol
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on May 05, 2010, 03:26:49 PM
This story is loosely connected to Lindsay in that the Executive Director commented on it in the news.  It is a sad story, but it is one we need to know about, if only to prevent its happening again --- in Oakland or in other cities--

This morning I read about a young deer (about one year old) who was shot by an Oakland police officer.

The incident began when two Oakland Housing Authority officers spotted the deer running on the 8700 block of Birch Street about 10:30 a.m., said housing authority spokesman Marcus Walton. The officers saw the deer running into the carport on 90th Avenue behind a home belonging to Kim McElmore. The animal then jumped a fence and ended up in Brian Campbell's backyard.

The housing authority officers notified Oakland animal control and the state Department of Fish and Game, Walton said.

But sources said that before a state game warden could arrive, Oakland police Sgt. Terrance West ordered another officer to kill the deer. The officer, whose name was not released, fired several shots, but the deer did not die immediately, so he fired several more shots, Weems said. A total of six or seven shots were fired but it was not known how many hit the deer...


According to a witness, the deer posed no threat to people.  It was simply standing in the corner of the yard, shaking.

You can read the story here:  Outrage over Deer Shot by Oakland Officer (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/05/05/BAGN1D9FV0.DTL)

I have sent a letter to the SF Chronicle and Oakland City Council and Oakland Police.

The video is on YT, and seeing it after reading the story made me angrier and sadder.  I'm sending a link to the story and video to friends who live in Oakland.  I know they will write letters and make calls.  We must be sure this doesn't happen again.  There's more crime in Oakland than the cops can handle, so why did they get involved?  The deer was simply in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Susan Heckly, wildlife rehabilitation director at the Lindsay Wildlife Museum in Walnut Creek, said Tuesday that she saw the video but didn't know the circumstances that led to the decision to shoot the deer.

Nevertheless, "from my vantage point, I would say that is not Plan A - that was probably a bad decision," Heckly said. "I don't know the police force's level of knowledge about wildlife or animals and how they train their officers."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEEYnriDfNQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEEYnriDfNQ)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on May 27, 2010, 09:11:46 PM
Thursdays I work at Lindsay Wildlife Museum's Hospital.  I fed many baby birds today, including two crows (fledglings).  There is quite a range of wildlife here, probably everything but marine mammals and big game.  I watched a small gopher snake get his meds, via injection under the skin.  (Baytril Antibacterial Injectible Solution)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/babygophersnake.jpg)
baby gopher snake
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on May 27, 2010, 09:11:49 PM
The opportunity to work with a wide range of wildlife is appreciated!  I saw a baby Opossum in his cage.  He was all curled up in his little hammock, which is a piece of cloth tied to the sides of his cage at four places.  A woman from the Opossum Team took him home.  There are many teams here that do home care.  The ones I know about are the following:

Dove Team, Squirrel Team, Opossum Team, Hummingbird Team, Raccoon Team, Bat Team.  These animals do much better in a quiet home environment than in a busy hospital.

So there are many animals checked in that I never see.  The animal comes in, is checked by the vet, a home team member is called, and the animal is picked up that day.  Each home care animal has the same records, meds, food, etc. as he would have in the hospital. 
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on May 28, 2010, 02:05:53 AM
Beans, the classes you're taking and the information that you're sharing with us here is soooooo interesting!  Thank you for taking the time to tell about it.  :clap

More, more, more, please.  :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 03, 2010, 07:28:28 PM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/YoungCoyote.jpg)

A few weeks ago, a young coyote was found stuck in a canal in Antioch. He was only about three and a half months old and was separated from his family. Contra Costa Animal Services rescued the young coyote and then brought him to the Lindsay Museum wildlife hospital.

The initial exam showed that the coyote was mildly dehydrated, had ticks in each of his ears, but was otherwise in good shape. Staff gave him fluids for the dehydration, removed the ticks and cleaned his ears.

The next morning, the coyote had eaten all the mice and rats that staff had placed in his kennel and he was deemed a fit candidate to reunite with his family. Staff connected with the coyote's original finder who located the area where he had seen the adult female coyote.
 
The young coyote was placed by a nearby tree, and soon he jumped up and started running. A few minutes later, staff saw him duck down into a den. He was safely home.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: luvthebirds on July 03, 2010, 10:40:03 PM
 :biggrin6
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 09, 2010, 04:57:45 PM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Other%20birds/brewers_blackbird.jpg)
Male Brewer's Blackbird

Yesterday at Lindsay I set up an incubator for an adult Brewer's Blackbird.  To date, most of my contact with songbirds has been feeding the babies.  While I cleaned and disinfected the incubator, he waited not-so-patiently in his small brown paper bag.  He had just been examined and weighed, and now he was to return to his cleaned incubator with fresh food and water in new dishes.

Songbirds are so different from the large pelagic birds I'm used to, such as grebes, gulls, loons, ducks, pelicans, etc.  As I was taking him out of the bag and putting him into the incubator, he got away!  I'm told this happens.  In fact, this issue was covered during training.  One turns out the lights in the room.  He was captured (he wasn't flying well and was hiding in a corner).  The interns grinned while my face went red.  Songbirds are so small and fragile I'm almost afraid to handle them.

An injured Scrub Jay was admitted while I was in the Treatment Room.  After a quick body exam, his mouth was swabbed with a long Q-tip that had been moistened with a saline solution.  Then the examiner touched the Q-tip to a slide and took it to the microscope.  What she was looking for is trichomoniasis.  All birds admitted to the hospital are screened for trichomoniasis.  New treatments have eliminated epidemics within the hospital.  (Trich wasn't found in this bird.)  To read more, click here (http://www.wildlife-museum.org/hospital/research/?researchID=3)

Lindsay presents the opportunity to work with a variety of wildlife, and I'm finding a like every animal I see.  I feel like I'm starting over, and in a way I am.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on July 09, 2010, 05:18:50 PM
Very interesting and challenging work, Beans.  They are fortunate to have you there to work with the birds and animals.  I'm so glad that the Blackbird and the young coyote are doing well.   :ecsmile
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Cawatcher on July 09, 2010, 05:21:28 PM
 :eclove What a lovely ending for the coyote!! Thank you for what you do!
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 09, 2010, 07:01:24 PM
The sooner we can release hospital patients, the better!  (providing they are fully recovered)

It's very stressful for wildlife to be in captivity. Causes of stress are abnormal light cycles, noise, repetitive handling, caging, diet, environment (humidity and temperature).
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on July 09, 2010, 08:53:43 PM
The sooner we can release hospital patients, the better!  (providing they are fully recovered)

It's very stressful for wildlife to be in captivity. Causes of stress are abnormal light cycles, noise, repetitive handling, caging, diet, environment (humidity and temperature).

Beans, that looks like it's the same stressful environment for eagles and other wildlife as it is for humans undergoing a stay in a hospital.  Your care and support for their needs makes such a big difference.   :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 10, 2010, 04:49:13 PM
A quote from The Outermost House by Henry Beston:

"We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals. Remote from universal nature, and living by complicated artifice, man in civilization surveys the creature through the glass of his knowledge and sees thereby a feather magnified and the whole image in distortion.

We patronize them for their incompleteness, for their tragic fate of having taken form so far below ourselves. And therein we err, and greatly err. For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear.

They are not brethren, they are not underlings; they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth."

I framed this quote, along with a sketch of a California Brown Pelican, and took it to International Bird Rescue Research Center.  I am making a second copy for Lindsay Wildlife.


Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on July 10, 2010, 10:24:25 PM
A lovely gift, Beans.  They will be so pleased to have them!    :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on July 29, 2010, 08:49:57 AM
I'm enjoying catching up on this topic and re-reading from the beginning.  On page 1 you give instructions for cleaning bird feeders weekly.  You next mention cleaning hummingbird feeders twice a week.  Are the recomendations for cleaning them, the same?

Also , if you know, or can find out how I can clean the bird bath.  I have it in a clearing, near a small tree but still it's in the sun.   ( safer from neighborhood cats ) There is a growth of reddish stuff, which I can't remove completely, and of course grows back quickly.  Bird bath is cement type.  The birds and I would appreciate knowing how to properly clean and maintain it.
Thanks  :ecsmile
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 29, 2010, 09:34:51 AM
Here is a good site about cleaning bird feeders. 

CLICK (http://birding.about.com/od/birdfeeders/a/feedercleantips.htm)

Here's another site that describes how to clean a bird bath.

CLICK (http://www.howtocleanstuff.net/outdoors/how-to-clean-a-bird-bath/)

Bird feeders can spread diseases, such as avian pox.  It's really important to keep feeders clean.  And bird baths, too.

I have several feeders.  When I take one down to clean, I have a fresh, clean one to put up.  I stopped using hummingbird feeders because I have plants that bloom year round for the hummers. 
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on July 29, 2010, 11:01:12 AM
Thanks beans I'll look those references up.  I have year round plants for hummers too, but they still like to supplement with the feeders. I have hooded orioles come also
.  They nest in some palm trees across the street :)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on July 29, 2010, 03:44:03 PM
Beans and Emc, I'm curious about the plants you have year-around for the hummers.  Would you please tell us what they are?  I know that varies by location/climate, but it's interesting to find out about what other folks find what works for where they live,

One of the best bushes I've seen, that was like a cafeteria for hummers, was a form of salvia with lots of red-pink flowers.  It was in the Santa Cruz Mountains, south of the San Francisco Bay Area.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 29, 2010, 05:28:07 PM
I have several varieties of salvia, most with red flowers.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on July 29, 2010, 05:54:15 PM
Hmm I have a  big bottle brush, a tall purple kind of salvia, red and lavender trumpet vines, and a flowering bush with pink blossoms, that I don't know it's name.  Also a hibiscus that I know they perch in and get insects from, not sure if they use it's nectar tho.  These are the ones I know they use.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on July 29, 2010, 06:31:09 PM
Beans and Emc, your gardens must be very nice for hummers and other wildlife! Please take pictures when you have blooming shrubs and bushes.  I have bottle brush, bougainvillea (that blooms its head off), pyracantha and most of the rest are green shrubs and trees.   The hummers seem to like the bottle brush.  I did have nine rose bushes, but can't really garden now.

We planted a navel orange years ago and it has the best, golden-color oranges that anyone has ever had.  The bees like the blossoms and they like the blue blossoms on the rosemary, too.   :eclove

There used to be more hummingbirds around.  Several times they've built nests that were low enough to see the babies.   :giggle

Several people in the chat room have mentioned that they have let parts of their property return to a natural state for the sake of wildlife.   :nod2

It would be fun to visit Doug and Sheila's garden, and also Booni's. :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on July 29, 2010, 07:24:05 PM
There are several birds that love the pyracantha berries. Robins, mockingbirds, and maybe cedar waxwings.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: passerine on July 29, 2010, 07:58:30 PM
Here, the Pacific NW the hummers go for the wild red currant bush, one of the earliest bloomers for their arrival, here they need the help of feeders especially when they arrive. There are only a couple stragglers left now :sad, their the loving the bee balm.

Mountain Ash & elderberry trees are favorite here for robins, waxwings, flickers.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on July 30, 2010, 05:51:56 PM
Beans: thanks for the suggestions and links for birdbaths and feeders.  I never thought of having 2 seed feeders, so 1 can dry and have another to put out. Duh?
I have always power washed the bird bath every day or every other day.  I have tried vinegar, and I've tried bleach solution.  Perhaps I didn't let the bleach work long enough before.  I let it sit for 20 min, much improved , but still a couple spots of live "whatevers".  I added the pennies after and will do it all again in a week to see if I can get the rest.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on July 30, 2010, 08:29:41 PM
Beans: thanks for the suggestions and links for birdbaths and feeders.   it sit for 20 min, much improved , but still a couple spots of live "whatevers"...I added the pennies after and will do it all again in a week to see if I can get the rest.

 Emc, does that mean you're going to pay the birds to clean the birdbath?   :chuckle 

(Couldn't resist.)

Emphasis added in blue.   :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on July 30, 2010, 08:43:52 PM
Well, I heard  Jays will work for peanuts! Lol
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on July 30, 2010, 08:46:42 PM
Seriously tho, on the link beans gave for cleaning birdbaths, it was suggested to place a few pennies in it to keep the algae from growing back. :puzzled2
I thought it's worth a try ....
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on July 30, 2010, 10:04:39 PM
Seriously tho, on the link beans gave for cleaning birdbaths, it was suggested to place a few pennies in it to keep the algae from growing back. :puzzled2
I thought it's worth a try ....

 :eclol  Emc, I figured that it probably something like that, but couldn't resist when you left the door wide open!   Cheers!  :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 24, 2010, 04:34:52 PM
From Lindsay Wildlife Museum hospital:

The hospital received 134 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 4560.

If you feed birds in your backyard, remember to keep the feeder clean. Many diseases, such as avian pox, salmonella, mycoplasma and trichomoniasis, can be spread from bird to bird at feeders and because feeders can attract large numbers of birds, the potential for spreading disease is large. Clean your feeder at least once a week. Wash it with soapy water and rinse, then soak it in a 1:32 bleach solution for 10 minutes. Let it air dry before refilling and hanging it.

As you can see, there are several protocols for washing feeders.  I have been washing them,  then soaking them in a 1:10 bleach solution, rinsing several times, and letting them air-dry.  My new feeders come apart easily.  (Aspect Quick-Clean feeders)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 24, 2010, 04:47:36 PM
A few weeks ago, at the end of my shift, I was putting some clean pillow cases in a drawer in ICU.  Shannon, one of the vets (and formerly with IBRRC), stopped me to show what "just came in."  She had two teensy wild turkey chicks!  We're never supposed to refer to any of the wildlife as cute, so I will simply say they were extra special.  I didn't take a picture, but I found a picture on the net --  and this is exactly what they looked like:

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Other%20birds/baby-chickwildturkey.jpg)

Note that they have that little..er... bump?*... on their ceres, which helps identify them.

*The flap of skin that hangs over the beak is called the snood.  Baby turkey chicks are called poults.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on August 24, 2010, 04:49:35 PM
Thanks for sharing them. We can say they are cute.  :biggrin6
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on August 24, 2010, 05:14:41 PM
Yes, WE sure can...cute, cute, cute!   :chuckle

Thank goodness we aren't under that restriction here.   :eclove

(But seriously, I do understand why they have that policy at the Lindsay Wildlife Museum.)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 27, 2010, 04:28:40 PM
This afternoon I received an update from Lindsay Wildlife Museum.  We talked about the dangers of sticky traps in our Everyone can help thread.  Here is what Lindsay has to say about them:

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/birdsstucktostickytrap.jpg)
sticky trap

 "Tell all your friends: DON’T USE STICKY TRAPS!
Recently, the hospital has received some birds that unfortunately crossed paths with sticky fly traps.  Some came in still stuck on the trap, while others, due to the rescuer’s attempt to remove the bird from the trap, were gooey and stripped of essential flight feathers. These birds came in otherwise healthy, but must remain in our care while we wait for their feathers to grow back. Right now, two of these birds, male and female house finches, are being cared for by a specially trained volunteer while we await the growth of the feathers.

If you find a bird (or other animal) stuck on a sticky trap, bring the whole trap with the animal to us as quickly as possible instead of attempting to remove the animal yourself. Using a special technique, we can safely remove the animal without harming the feathers or the skin and then we can carefully clean off all the residue. For these finches, all that is left is to wait for new feathers to grow back. Essentially, it’s a waiting game.

Why do we have to wait? Without their flight feathers, birds can’t fly. The mechanics of flight are complicated. Different species of birds have developed specific wings shapes that create the pull, thrust, and drag that allow them to fly, maneuver, and land. The wings are made up of three types of feathers that influence the mechanics of flight: primary, secondary, and covert feathers. In addition to the wing feathers, tail feathers are also essential for flight.

The female house finch is growing back her primary feathers on her left wing. These primary feathers create the thrust that is generated when the bird is flapping through the air. The male lost half of his tail feathers. After he grows in the rest of his tail, he’ll be able to create drag that will slow him down and allow him to land.

Both birds are healthy and time is on their side. In the meantime, tell all your friends to use their sticky traps ONLY indoors where birds and other animals won’t come in contact with them."

Lacey Babnik - Lindsay Wildlife hospital intern

Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: birdvoyer on August 27, 2010, 05:25:09 PM
Thanks, beans, for this valuable infomation. I am finally getting caught up on some of my reading here. Guess we don't have use for sticky traps in my area so never thought about how devistating they would be on the birds. Hopefully they will become "indoor" tools for folks to use.

I think the little "calico" poults are adorable. (I didn't say "that" word)
 :biggrin3
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: rheawalters on August 28, 2010, 07:17:17 AM
Beans, I want to thank you so much for sharing so much valuable information. :bow Some of the stuff you share I would never have thought of.

 :puzzled2 Help me understand why you shouldn't refer to wildlife as 'cute'? ... all babies are cute ...well maybe not baby owls, they look more like gargoyles.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: AJL on August 28, 2010, 09:18:14 AM
 :ecnono I loath those sticky traps and tanglefoot, and have had to free many a bird from them. In order to free them we have to use oil, so then the bird has to be washed - it is all very stressful for them. While trapped they are vulnerable, terrified, without food and water, at the mercy of predators and insects. They can come in terribly dehydrated and emaciated.  Sometimes they are parents with young on the nest, so their nestlings suffer too.  It is cruel.

Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 28, 2010, 10:42:02 AM
Years ago, I tried one of those sticky traps for white flies.  It caught a butterfly (which I couldn't save) so I took it down, put it in a plastic bag, and threw it away.   :mgritted

AJ, I sent you a PM about Lindsay....
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Maria dB on August 30, 2010, 06:58:20 AM
I don't use sticky traps either. I remember my grandmother having them in the summer when I was little Ugh!. They are horrible and cruel. I put all my rubbish that attracts flies in news paper or polybags in the bin (trash can to our USA friends :biggrin3) I hardly have any flies in the house and I don't have maggots in the bin like some of my neighbours complain about.  Where I live they have stopped emptying  our bins weekly and it's each fortnight. It's disgusting. In the summer they should be emptied twice a week.  :toetap

The turkey chics are so cute. I'm glad I'm a veggie. How could anyone eat  them  :nope
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on September 14, 2010, 05:47:48 PM
The hospital received 73 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 4850.

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/Lindsayhospital.jpg)

Sticky stuff continues to be a problem for wildlife and the hospital is seeing more patients coming in with this sticky material in their feathers or fur. It's not just sticky rodent and insect traps, but also the sticky material (Tanglefoot is one brand) used on trees to keep ants from climbing and a sticky bird "repellent" placed on beams and ledges to keep birds off buildings. Both of these products are dangerous to birds that come in contact with it.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: passerine on September 15, 2010, 08:53:21 AM
4850  :eceek I had no idea the use of sticky stuff was so widely used, it should be outlawed.
Wonder who a person talks to about that, now that finally more pesticides & herbicides are being taken off the shelves this item should be added also.

Lucky for this Band tailed Pigeon he was found so sad for the ones that aren't & starve to death. :eccry

Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on September 15, 2010, 09:44:32 AM
It's up to each state to do things like banning those sticky traps in the U.S.  That means that each state's legislative bodies have to do it separately.  In California, we have many protective laws that go beyond what most of the other states do and we often lead the way on laws that affect the environment, people and other living things.  I need to check to see if anything has been proposed about the sticky traps.  :puzzled2

It's a struggle to protect the West Coast from additional oil drilling, especially since California does have untapped oil resources offshore, beyond those rigs that are already operating. So far, we've been able to stop new drilling from going forward, but who knows what will happen in the future if the federal government okays it?!   :pray

Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on September 28, 2010, 08:00:34 PM
The hospital received 47 animals last week, bringing the total to 4965 for this year.

Eleven of the patients (23%) came to us because they were caught by cats. The list of cat-caught animals includes four mourning doves, one scrub jay, one robin, one house finch, one fox sparrow, two brush rabbits and two baby deer mice that were orphaned when the mother was killed by a cat. Please keep cats indoors to save wildlife.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on October 01, 2010, 12:16:41 PM
Yesterday, someone brought in a young domestic pigeon.  He's feathered, but they are not completely grown out.  Unfortunately, Lindsay does not take in pigeons, unless they are Band-tailed Pigeons, which are natives.  This one is probably a Rock Pigeon.  No one was available to take him to wildlife hospital that takes non-native pigeons.  I couldn't take him to Wildcare in San Rafael.  I looked at Shannon, our vet, and asked what would happen to him.  She didn't have to answer, I knew by looking at her face.  (humane euthanization).

I asked, "Could I take him and then bring him to Wildcare or a woman in Rodeo (she's been taking wild birds into her home for 40 years)?  Could you show me how to feed him?  And tell me what to buy?"

The answer was YES.

So now I have him in my home.  Shannon weighed him, and told me he should get 15 - 20 ml of food in a syringe about every 3 hours.  She held him while I fed him, giving me instructions.  I mix one rounded teaspoon of Kaytee Exact Handfeeding Formula to three teaspoons of water.  The water is very warm to begin with, and the mixture needs to sit for about a moment to cool down to lukewarm.  It also gets thicker as it sits.

The food is pulled up into a 20 ml syringe.  Any air is pushed out of the syringe by holding it up and depressing the plunger. 

I gently held his beak, with neck extended, and inserted the feeding tube into his beak, behind the trachea, and down into the crop.  Then I gently pressed the plunger on the syringe.  He wasn't excited about the procedure, but after he was fed, he settled down and took a little nap.

He is in a special plastic box with holes, covered with a top with holes.  The box is lined with a hand towel.  His box is placed on a heating pad set to low and covered with a pillow case.  He's near a window with sheer curtains, and I pull the pillow case up on that side so he will get enough light.  I change his towel each time I feed him so that he won't get feces on his feathers.

He has a slightly swollen hock, and the woman I am taking him to knows how to take care of him.  Birds are brought from both IBRRC and Lindsay to her.  He will be in good hands, and when he's ready, he'll be released.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLTgKWYEZy0

I would like to add that he is the most beautiful pigeon baby in the world.  And he's so smart!  He seems to understand that when I appear he will be fed and he cooperates as best he can.  And as I was leaving Lindsay with my special baby, Shannon remarked to me, "I knew you would take him."
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: birdvoyer on October 01, 2010, 12:42:19 PM
Beans, we are so lucky to have you in our midst. And so is baby "Rock." You are so inspirational.

I see a rehab annex in the making now.  
  :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on October 01, 2010, 02:56:27 PM
Beans, thank you for sharing this with us.  You are a very special person to take the baby home and make sure that it receives good care, now and when you take it to the next home, so it has a good chance of living in the wild later on.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Rajame on October 01, 2010, 03:58:06 PM
(((Beans))) Thank you.  :thumbup:  :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on October 01, 2010, 05:31:17 PM
I love that Shannon said " I knew you'd take him home"   :heart :eclove

What a thrill for you to have the opportunity!  And for the pigeon too, a second chance at life.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on October 01, 2010, 08:46:07 PM
I took him to Judith tonight.  Just by the way she handled him, I knew he was in very good hands.  She checked him quickly, expertly, and pronounced him just fine.  She said she would keep him because hand-fed baby pigeons become too trusting of people and should not be released into the wild.  She will give me updates.  Oh, your hearts would have melted to see him wrapped up in the pillow case that covered his plastic box and held so protectively against her while she looked at his hock and felt his crop (it was empty:  feeding time again).  At her suggestion, I had named him.  He's Chico --  but he may end up being Chica.  Time will tell.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: passerine on October 01, 2010, 09:09:20 PM
 :wub Love a happy ending, thanks beans.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on October 01, 2010, 11:14:36 PM
A very happy outcome.  Thank you for making sure it happened that way, Beans. :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Rajame on October 01, 2010, 11:53:03 PM
(((Beans))) and (((Chica))) and (((Judith))) and (((rehabbers everywhere))) :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: AJL on October 02, 2010, 10:46:53 PM
 :eclove That is lovely Beans.

We hand rear doves and pigeons from a very young age (even from hatch) and don't have a problem with imprinting at all but in the case of feral domestics (rock doves), especially in states or provinces where rehabilitation of non-native species is not allowed by the government, it is wonderful to have people like Judith who will give them good lives.  :nod2

(When possible, many centres also use non-releasable adults who do some of the feeding and fostering! The columbids are so hard-wired for parenting that even some that have never bred, begin producing crop milk for the squabs. Fostering, and even just exposing nestlings to adults in recovery in nearby enclosures, greatly reduces the chance of habituation).

 
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on October 02, 2010, 11:02:40 PM
Isn't nature amazing, Ajl?!  Thank you for telling us about fostering and that being near an adult is beneficial for the young ones, even if they are not in the same space/nest.   :ecsmile
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on October 08, 2010, 10:13:47 AM
Judith sent me this picture from her cell phone this morning.  It is the first time she has sent a picture to an email address.  Chico is doing very well.  Starting out with 20 ml of food, he is now up to 50!  I've learned that pigeons have very large crops.  When Chico hears her coming to feed him, he gets very excited and flaps his wings.  She picks him up, cuddles him, and talks to him.  And here he is, sitting on a very nice chair, waiting to be fed!  Other times, he is in his brooder, heated to 85 degrees.  He's growing fast, his swollen hock looks good (the swelling is gone), and he's a happy pigeon. 

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/ChicoOct82010.jpg)

I'm so pleased and over-the-top happy that this all worked out.   :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Faerie Gardener on October 08, 2010, 05:14:07 PM
What a wonderful story and the picture is precious. Thank you for sharing this with us. :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 11, 2011, 07:07:32 PM
In 2010 we received 5451 animals: 4078 birds, 1263 mammals, 98 reptiles and 10 amphibians. The most numerous species were house finch (551), fox squirrel (475), mourning dove (432), mallard (367), opossum (297), western scrub-jay (208) and California towhee (160). Most of the patients came from nearby cities: Concord (759), Walnut Creek (758), Martinez (359), Pleasant Hill (347), Danville (284) and Lafayette (259)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on January 11, 2011, 08:15:05 PM
Beans, that's a very busy place doing good work!   :eclove   Any more stories to tell about the birds and animals there?
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 14, 2011, 03:24:09 PM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/LindsayGHO.jpg)

In mid-December, an adult great horned owl was found on the ground being attacked by crows. Fortunately, the person who witnessed the scene is a bander with the Golden Gate Raptor Observatory who brought the owl to our wildlife hospital for treatment.. During the initial exam, we found the owl was not only dangerously thin but also had several large wounds on his right wing.

This owl has been with Lindsay Wildlife Museum Hospital for three weeks now and is getting better each day.

During the initial exam, we found the owl had several large wounds on its right wing, especially along the patagium, which is a special membrane essential for flight. The owl was also dangerously thin.

We cleaned and sutured the wounds, but an infection had already set in. We put the owl on several medications for pain and to help control the infection. Hospital staff also began a hand-feeding schedule and very slowly the owl started to gain weight. There were several set-backs at the beginning, but after about two weeks, the owl started eating reliably on its own.

It has been three weeks now since the owl first came to us. Since then, the owl has gained almost 500 grams and the infection in its wing has healed! The owl holds its injured wing lower than its healthy wing and is still too weak from its ordeal for us to determine its ability to fly. We hope to move the owl into an aviary in the coming days so it can continue to build its strength.

The owl has come a long way since it first came to us, but still has a long road ahead to what we hope will be a full recovery and release back into the wild.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on January 14, 2011, 03:48:09 PM
So glad the right person saw the owl in trouble.  Sure hope it continues to heal and will be able to gain strength and fly again soon. :ecsmile
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on January 14, 2011, 04:35:36 PM
Beans, that is a very good-looking owl.  I hope it continues to heal well and eventually be able to fly.  How fortunate that a trained person found him.   :eclove  Thanks for telling us about this survival story!
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 14, 2011, 07:50:14 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucic0TuBs1A
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on January 14, 2011, 08:57:51 PM
Beans, that's a nice video with the volunteer showing some of the museum and her handling of a raptor.  Kids must love to go there.   :eclove  I would like to visit and see the exhibits and hear some of the educational talks, also!   :ecsmile
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: watermaid on January 14, 2011, 11:21:44 PM
Very heart warming story.  Thank you for posting, Beans.
Watermaid  :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: cakiepie on January 15, 2011, 07:20:38 AM
Thanks Beans for posting the video of the wildlife museum.  The volunteer made a statement "the more you know, the more you care"  that has been very true for me...an end result of finding Hornby Eagles and all the folks associated with it.      :thumbup:
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on January 15, 2011, 06:45:25 PM
Very heart warming story.  Thank you for posting, Beans.
Watermaid  :heart

Yes, Watermaid!!!   :heart

Cakiepie, the same thing happened to me, too.  The more I learn about eagles and other wildlife, the more I want to know!   :thumbup:   :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Faerie Gardener on January 16, 2011, 03:20:16 PM
Uh-Oh, now I'm in love with an Owl!!! Thanks so much, Beans, for posting the picture and story of the Great Horned Owl.     :wub :wub
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on February 16, 2011, 10:34:25 AM
Quick update:

The hospital received 33 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 188.

Two of the patients were great horned owls that had been caught on barbed wire fences--one in Oakley and one in Pleasanton. Both owls have guarded prognosis for recovery because of the severity of their wounds, but staff is hopeful they will heal successfully.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on February 16, 2011, 01:11:26 PM
Beans, that's such a hazard for birds and animals...so much barbed wire around!  Thanks for the update.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on February 22, 2011, 10:55:13 PM
The hospital received the first baby fox squirrels of the season. While these first squirrels were in a nest that was blown out of a palm tree during a storm, many squirrels come to us because of tree trimming. If you can't wait until next fall to have your trees trimmed, make sure you avoid the trees with the big leafy nests and alert any tree trimmers to their presence. With just a little care and attention, you can help us by leaving the squirrel nest (and family) intact. Please share this information with your friends and neighbors.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on March 02, 2011, 10:49:14 AM
The hospital received 35 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 253.

Many mammals are looking for denning sites now that spring is almost here. Nocturnal mammals such as raccoons, skunks and opossums are looking for places that are dark and quiet during the day--attics, crawl spaces and under decks. Make sure your crawl space and attic vents are secure to prevent wildlife families in your home.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on March 08, 2011, 07:46:02 PM
Lindsay hospital received 45 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 295.

Four of the patients were house finches suffering from mycoplasma infections. This eye disease affects house finches, goldfinches and other songbirds and can be spread at bird feeders. It's really important to clean and sanitize your bird feeder at least once a week to keep birds healthy.

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/House%20and%20Yard/lookingatthepeanuts.jpg)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on March 08, 2011, 08:14:35 PM
I'd love to see a picture of the fox squirrels. :)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on March 22, 2011, 05:14:47 PM
I won't have any pictures to post of Fox Squirrels at Lindsay --  when they are brought to the hospital, a call is made to the Squirrel Team, and out they go the same day!

--------------

Lindsay hospital received 62 animals last week, bringing the total to 404 for this year.

Ten of the patients were baby opossums that were found still attached to the nipples of their dead mother. The whole lot was brought to the hospital where the staff carefully removed the babies. Nine of the babies have survived so far. If you find a dead opossum, check to see if there are babies in the pouch. Don't try to remove the babies yourself, but bring the mother, with offspring still attached, to the nearest wildlife hospital.

Here is what a baby Opossum looks like (not a Lindsay hospital picture)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Other%20Wildlife/baby_possum.jpg)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on March 22, 2011, 10:43:01 PM
The baby opossum is cute.  :biggrin6
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 17, 2011, 08:29:38 PM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/RescuedBarnOwl.jpg)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/MarciaMetzlerwildliferehabsupervisorAnnekeMorescodirectorofveterinaryservices.jpg)


Owl rescued from Suisun Bay's 'ghost fleet'

By Elisabeth Nardi /Contra Costa Times June 17, 2011

Quote
It turns out that the Mothball Fleet, a collection of abandoned warships in Suisun Bay, is host to an unexpected aviary.

Sandy Plate, a volunteer with the Lindsay Wildlife Museum in Walnut Creek, recently boarded a rusted-out oiler to save a barn owl. Aboard the vessels, she witnessed nests of other birds who made their home on the ships -- purportedly raccoons and even an opossum have been found in the "ghost fleet…."

The bird had taken flight from a large hole on the ship where it was living in when it landed on an osprey's nest. The osprey had cornered the owl and was preparing to attack it when crews at the Mothball Fleet found the owl.

Plate took a small boat out to the large ship and climbed aboard to find the owl hiding above a cabinet. She was able to grab the owl, which was not hurt but was a fledgling that had not yet mastered flying. It could have drowned if it had landed on the water, she said. The barn owl is likely male, though wildlife experts are not completely sure…

The bird, now at the museum's wildlife hospital in Walnut Creek, was treated for insects in its ears, said Polly Gusa, Lindsay's barn owl species manager. At the hospital, the owl receives medication and eats about six mice a day…

On Wednesday, workers brought the 11-week white-faced owl with deep-set eyes out of its carrier to record its weight, which is about 400 grams. The owl made a hissing, screaming sound as though someone was strangling a cat. Gusa said it was being defensive.

With gloved hands, technicians stuck a tube attached to a syringe deep into the owl's throat to hydrate it.

Within the next few days, museum officials will check on the owl's progress by freeing live rodents in front of him and seeing whether it still has its predatory nature to scoop up prey. The owl likely will be released in Benicia, near where he was rescued, within a few weeks….

The museum usually sees about 150 barns owls a year, said Susan Heckly, wildlife rehabilitation director. A couple of barn owls also are on display at the museum.

In the central United States, barn owls are becoming endangered, as there are fewer barns for them to live in, Heckly said. In California, they thrive mainly because they have adapted to living in palm trees --and apparently boats in Suisun Bay, she added.

link to full article (http://www.thereporter.com/ci_18298412?source=most_emailed)




Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: PamNY on June 21, 2011, 11:32:00 AM
These are such fascinating stories. Thanks for posting and for the work you do.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on June 22, 2011, 12:31:20 PM
such a gorgeous bird. so glad it is being cared for. Do they feel a need to rescue any of the other animals on that ship?
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 28, 2011, 11:27:26 PM
I don't think they found any other animals on the ship.

From Lindsay's Hot Sheet:

The hospital received 235 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 2869.

One of the patients was a fledgling raven brought to us because it had become tangled in plastic twine that the parents used to build their nest. The raven was found when biologists noticed that the siblings had all left the nest, but this one was still there in distress. Please pick up and properly destroy anything that might entangle wildlife. String, fishing line, plastic material and things with loops like six-pack rings can all be dangerous for wildlife.

In a few days I will post some good news that concerns Lindsay Wildlife Museum and Cascades Raptor Center.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 12, 2011, 10:34:36 PM
The hospital received 224 animals last week, bringing the total to 3325 for this year.

Five of the patients were young white-throated swifts. Swifts spend most of their day aloft, feeding on insects in midair. They commonly nest in cliff crevasses, and under overpasses and other structures in our area. If they land on the ground, they are unable to take off because their wings are long and their legs are short. If they leave their nests before they can fly well, they are likely to end up grounded and unable to get off the ground.

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Other%20birds/white-throatedswift.jpg)
White-throated Swift (not a Lindsay photo)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on July 12, 2011, 10:45:00 PM
224 in one week seems like a lot!  Is it the time of the year, that the numbers are high?
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 12, 2011, 11:31:22 PM
Wildlife hospitals are very busy from April through September.  Baby animal season.  Many baby birds.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 23, 2011, 04:52:21 PM
On Thursday, I worked in the outside aviaries (flight aviaries).  One of the aviaries had a dozen young Scrub Jays who were learning how to fly.  Some were still being hand fed with a syringe.  If they cam to me on one of the branches, fluffed their feathers, and begged, I would feed them.  Jays are easy.  They know when they have had enough and they stop gaping.  They were so excited about the food!  I had them on my head, my shoulders, my arms.  However, I did not feed them unless they were on the branch closest to me.  I didn't want them to fly to land on humans after they were released.

The next thing to do was clean up the aviary, which means replacing the sheets on the floor and providing fresh bowls of food and water.  When I came back into the aviary without the feeding cup and syringe, I got a different reception.  They flew away from me.

Ok, so I did a double shift and fed them again around 5 PM.  I walked in with the syringe and feeding cup and got the friendly reception. 

One of the other aviaries I worked in was the one with our Raven.  As I may have said earlier, he doesn't see well, so he cannot be released back into the wild.  He was brought to us as a fledgling, so he knows he's a Raven.  He's smart and feisty and I am privileged to have been trained to work with him.  Thursday he took a bath and then flapped his wings like mad and gave me a shower.  I am pretty sure he was laughing when he did this.   :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Rajame on July 23, 2011, 06:22:38 PM
Great story! Those ravens and very smart - or should we say smart-alecks?! :hearts 2
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: luvthebirds on July 23, 2011, 06:24:47 PM
Thanks for the post, Beans.  It is wonderful that you are helping so many birds in need.  :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on July 27, 2011, 12:03:28 PM
What a delight! Thanks for relating your day, it took us right with you into the avaries. Thanks for explaining re: feeding the jays, only on a branch and in their begging stance. :)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 02, 2011, 09:47:06 PM
The hospital received 151 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 3847.

If you feed birds in your backyard, remember to keep the feeder clean. Many diseases, such as avian pox, salmonella, mycoplasma and trichomoniasis, can be spread from bird to bird at feeders and because feeders can attract large numbers of birds, the potential for spreading disease is large. Clean your feeder at least once a week. Wash it with soapy water and rinse, and then soak it in a 1:32 bleach solution for 10 minutes. Let it air dry before refilling and hanging it.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 09, 2011, 09:34:03 PM
A new baby Raven came to Lindsay a couple of weeks ago.  His problem:  emaciation.  He has been eating very well since he's been at Hotel Lindsay!  Today I gave him six young mice, each cut up into four pieces, 2 T mealworms, kibble mix (soaked kibble with minced vegetables -- it looks like turkey stuffing), pieces of fruits & veggies, berries and nuts.

Currently, Baby is in a large kennel, and I have to take him out and put him on top of the kennel when it is cleaned.  His kennel is in a closet-sized room, which we normally use for quarantine.  He will be moved into Aviary 1, where our other Raven lives, on Saturday, after it is thoroughly cleaned.  The Aviary is large so he'll have a place to stretch his wings and fly and run around while he's with us.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 09, 2011, 09:44:36 PM
Meanwhile, our Raven who is going to Cascades Raptor Center on Saturday is doing well.  Today I spent about three hours with him, off and on.  Affection training is very important.  He's very relaxed with me and wants to step on my shoulder or hand.  I don't allow this because he will be trained to the glove at CRC, and we don't want him to develop any bad habits before he leaves us.

His new toy is a soft rubber ducky.   I put it in his large, black water dish on the floor.  And now he comes down to the floor to play with it in the water.  He also flew a little today.  While I'm busy changing the sheets on the bottom of the aviary, he likes to sneak up and grab my pants with his beak. 

Here are some pics:

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Ravens/Raven05Aug92011.jpg)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Ravens/Raven04Aug92011.jpg)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Ravens/Raven032011.jpg)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Ravens/Raven02Aug92011.jpg)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Ravens/Raven01Aug92011.jpg)

He's moving around a lot, having had his lunch, so it's difficult to get a clear picture of him.  If you look closely, you may be able to see his new tail feathers. 
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 09, 2011, 09:58:47 PM
The hospital received 179 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 4026.

Forty-five of the patients were brought to us because they were injured by house cats. Please help us save wildlife by keeping cats indoors
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: passerine on August 10, 2011, 07:54:38 PM
Awww, beans love the Raven, TY. :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 12, 2011, 12:57:18 AM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Ravens/RavenAug112011.jpg)

Video:  Raven Says Goodbye! (http://www.youtube.com/user/MyWildlifeVideos?feature=mhee#p/a/u/0/mCKRH5MZqP8)

Well, I'm packed and ready to go to Cascades Raptor Center in Eugene, Oregon. I'll take my rubber ducky and a few toys. I hear the food is great, and the staff is friendly. I can't be released back into the wild because I don't see very well. I'll have my own outdoor aviary with plenty to do because I'm training to be an education bird.

Corvus corax

------------

Today I told him goodbye.  We had a great time together.  He was calm and happy.  While I was there, another member of the "Raven Squad" came in and gave him some mealworms, which he loves.  I fed him some blueberries. 

He was fascinated with the camera and kept an eye on it.  After I turned it off, he ran around the aviary as usual.  When it was time to go, he followed me to the door as if to say, "you're not leaving already?"  I shall miss him, but I'm so glad he will be at CRC, where he will have a good life, with plenty of enrichment and training. 
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on August 12, 2011, 01:18:06 AM
Wonderful story about Raven, Beans.  It is bittersweet to have to say goodbye, while at the same time knowing that he's going to have an even larger role and a good place to live and 'work.'   :heart

He was very interested in what you were doing and your camera!   :nod2
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 13, 2011, 10:59:18 AM
From the Lindsay Wildlife Museum Newsletter:

On occasion even wildlife hospital staff is surprised by what comes through the door. They may think they have seen it all but every now and then something surprises them. Before you continue reading, be prepared for squeamish details of two recent cases.

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/LindsayBarnOwl.jpg)

In late July the wildlife hospital received an immature barn owl in serious trouble. It had been attempting to eat a dead ground squirrel when the leg of the squirrel got caught in the bird's lower beak. The rest of the squirrel was hanging out of the owl's mouth. Unfortunately this presented several problems for the owl. It was unable to eat, unable to fly and the dead squirrel attracted flies which laid eggs on both the squirrel and inside the owl's mouth! By the time the owl was found and brought to the wildlife hospital, its mouth was full of maggots. Hospital staff quickly removed the squirrel carcass and the many maggots crawling in the owl's mouth. The owl was given fluids and was placed on an antiparasitic and an antibiotic. It took a couple of weeks for the inside of the owl's mouth to heal but it has since been moved to one of our large outdoor aviaries!

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/LindsayRedtail.jpg)

Just as staff thought they had seen it all, then three days after the owl arrived, an immature red-tailed hawk was brought in with the knee of a dead ground squirrel lodged in its throat with the rest of the squirrel hanging out of its mouth. Like in the barn owl's case, flies were attracted to the dead ground squirrel and laid eggs on the squirrel and the hawk. The hawk was completely infested with maggots in its mouth and on its skin around its eyes and beak. Hospital staff removed the squirrel carcass, anesthetized the hawk and flushed many maggots out from underneath the hawk's skin. The hawk also had a large laceration over its throat which was cleaned and sutured. The hawk was given a pain medication, an antiparasitic and an antibiotic. The hawk has now fully recovered and is also in a large outdoor aviary.

Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on August 13, 2011, 11:45:45 AM
Wow, sounds like the squirrels were tough little guys fighting for all they were worth. Interesting but yucky!

Glad the owl and red taiked hawk were found in time and helped. Hope they can be releaded soon?  :biggrin6
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on August 30, 2011, 10:21:18 AM
Beans, how are the owl and hawk doing now?  Thank goodness they could be helped.   :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 30, 2011, 10:30:16 AM
I think they are still in their aviaries.  I don't look at them when I pass by (the aviaries have dark green netting on the outside to give the birds privacy) because that makes them nervous. 

This week I'm releasing some birds --  mockingbirds I think.  I'll find out on Thursday.

----------

The hospital received 139 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 4309.

One of the patients was a brown pelican found at a marina in Oakley with fishhooks in its eyelid and bill. We removed the hooks and sutured the wounds. Please pick up discarded hooks and line around fishing areas. Even if you don't fish, be on the lookout for discarded materials that can injure wildlife.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on August 30, 2011, 01:57:25 PM
Beans, thanks for your reply here.  Sorry about the harm done by hooks and fishing line...I don't fish, but I hope people that do will pay attention to their equipment.

I enjoy your wonderful videos.   :thumbup:
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on August 30, 2011, 02:08:29 PM
Thank you :)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on September 08, 2011, 12:06:32 AM
Last Tuesday I transported our young Raven and five Crows to the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley.  One of the five Crows will spend the winter there.  The others will be released at an earlier date, once they have passed their flight tests. 

Baby Raven (fledgling who came to Lindsay emaciated) is very healthy now, but she (or he) needs time with other Ravens to "wild her up" before she is released.  The Ravens will be released together.

http://www.wcsv.org/
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on December 13, 2011, 01:30:46 PM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/tvulture.jpg)

Turkey Vulture Goes Back to School (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9fvh5EkEos&feature=youtu.be)

At the end of October, Lindsay Wildlife Museum's hospital received a phone call about a turkey vulture that flew into the side of a building at Antioch Charter Academy. It was brought to the wildlife hospital suffering a concussion and a sprained wrist joint. After pain medications and rest it was ready for release in early December. Staff drove the vulture back to the school where it was found, and all of the children and teachers from the school came out to watch the release!
A great big thank you to the teachers and the children at Antioch Charter Academy for caring enough to help a turkey vulture in need!
Read the full story Here (http://www.wildlife-museum.org/hospital/stories/?id=65&utm_content=jeaniesa%40gmail.com&utm_source=VerticalResponse&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=Read%20the%20turkey%20vulture%27s%20full%20story%20here.&utm_campaign=WildWildlife%20Connections%20-%20Happy%20holidays!)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on December 13, 2011, 04:49:08 PM
Super that the kids and the school cared enough about a turkey vulture. So glad it was able to be rehabilitated. :ecsmile

Very interesting that other turkey vultures gathered as he was carried out to be released. So much we don't undertand about the communication involved between the birds.  :biggrin3
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Faerie Gardener on December 17, 2011, 09:02:45 PM
What a nice story.  I remember how cute the baby turkey vulture chicks were in an earlier post!
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on December 18, 2011, 11:26:24 AM
That's a heart-warming story, Beans.  I hope the teachers who are part of our chatters/viewers/forum members' family will share it with their students!   :thumbup:
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Cawatcher on December 18, 2011, 11:37:50 AM
Thank You Beans needed this wonderful story :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on January 31, 2012, 05:07:43 PM
The hospital received 32 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 144.

Two of the patients--a black-crowned night heron and a mallard--were brought to us because they were tangled in fishing line. It's important to pick up discarded fishing line and hooks and dispose of it safely. Over the years many animals have come to the hospital because of fishing line or fish hooks, including turtles and many species of aquatic birds. Even if you are not a fisherman yourself, watch for and pick up discarded line when around bodies of water.

We all know this --  but most people don't understand the problems caused by leftover fishing line and hooks.

From WildCare:

CLICK HERE (http://www.wildcarebayarea.org/site/PageServer?pagename=TakeAction_FishingLine)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on January 31, 2012, 05:28:21 PM
Yes , Beans.  And here is the link to our forum thread about fishing line and wildlife:

http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=808.0
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on March 31, 2012, 10:28:08 AM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/LindsayGoldenEagle.png)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/LindsayGoldenEagle2.png)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/LindsayGoldenEagle3.png)

Release of Golden Eagle Newspaper Article (http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_20284639/walnut-creeks-lindsay-wildlife-museum-releases-golden-eagle?IADID=Search-www.mercurynews.com-www.mercurynews.com)

I knew something was up last Thursday when I arrived for my shift at the hospital.  Most of the staff were gone --  they were releasing a three year old Golden Eagle.  He was found in October dragging his wing in a shopping center.  He was probably hit by a car.  Dr. Shannon Riggs, out chief veterinarian, surgically pinned three fractured bone wings. 

I remember him in his large aviary, standing on a low perch.  My task (with another volunteer) was to give him clean water and deliver 4 or 5 euthanized dead mice.  He slightly raised his wings when I entered and kept an eye on me the whole time.

He was banded and successfully released.  As stated in the article, such a golden eagle release is rate in this area because those brought to the animal hospital usually have been injured at the Altamont wind farm and never fully recover…..

I also uploaded a copy of the video to YouTube, just in case the video disappears from the web site:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQBPOuIF_To
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Rajame on March 31, 2012, 10:56:02 AM
Priceless is correct! Sending hugs to all at Lindsay. :hug
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on March 31, 2012, 12:21:33 PM
Fantastic that he could be released after wing fracture and pinning. I don't know if this can be a teaching example of what can be done with some fractured wings. It would be fabulous if more could be pinned, rehabbed and released.  :biggrin6

Jean, why was the Golden Eagle tossed up for release instead of put on the ground? It still was a gentle release.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on March 31, 2012, 12:53:11 PM
Trish was already holding him for half an hour while he was being banded, measured, and having a blood test.  He was anxious to go.  He arrived in a carrier, of course, but had to be held for all of the above.  In that case, she needed to release him directly from her arms.  In that case, I think a launch must be done, for the safety of both the releaser and releasee.

I've seen raptors, including eagles, simply walk out of their carriers.  As for me, the only birds I've personally released are seabirds and songbirds.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on March 31, 2012, 01:42:44 PM
Thanks for explaining. She did well launching him at a comfortable speed for him.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on April 02, 2012, 09:59:30 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NjZ8bwjuwk

Here's another video of the Golden Eagle's release.  The volunteer with the camera did an excellent job of filming his long flight after release.  Bravo!
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on April 02, 2012, 11:41:04 AM
Wow! The long flight is fabulous to see! Checking out the area, exercising his wings.  :ecsmile Jean, do you know what the other bird is who flew over?
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on April 10, 2012, 07:12:36 PM
The hospital received 98 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 704.

Twenty-one of the patients last week were caught and injured by cats. Even though there are many other hazards for wildlife in our neighborhoods, free-roaming house cats cause a high percentage of the damage. Keep cats indoors as much as possible. For information on how to make an outdoor cat a happy indoor cat, check the American Bird Conservancy's website: http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/cats/index.html
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on May 02, 2012, 06:40:47 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7mg9MMOSjY

Baby Great Horned Owl successfully re-nested!
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on May 02, 2012, 07:04:10 PM
Congratulations to Lindsay and the Great Horned Owl parents.  :biggrin3
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on May 16, 2012, 09:42:54 PM
Peregrine falcon release (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQ4fXyFgZXY#ws)

I remember this beautiful falcon in the hospital
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Tigerlady105 on May 16, 2012, 09:57:11 PM
Beans, it was wonderful to 'fly' with the falcon and watch as the owlet was re-nested.  Very good work being done at Lindsay!  :thumbup:
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on May 29, 2012, 09:36:41 PM
The hospital received 291 animals last week, bringing the total to 2119 for this year.

We are starting to see lots of fledgling birds coming out of their nests before they can fly very well. This is a normal and necessary part of growing up for these birds. Keep people and pets away so the parents will feel comfortable coming down to feed their offspring. It usually takes only a couple of days for most birds to master flight skills and join their parents off the ground
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 02, 2012, 10:26:50 AM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/Greatgrayowl02.jpg)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/Greatgrayowl03.jpg)  

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/greatgrayowl01.jpg)

Our Lindsay Great Gray Owl is a hero.  

A Great Gray owlet, who fell out of his nest, was brought to Lindsay Wildlife Museum hospital a few weeks ago.  To avoid imprinting from humans, we isolated him in one of our aviaries.  Staff dressed up like a bush in a special costume when they entered the aviary to bring mice.  Our Great Gray Owl acted as surrogate parent.  And he acted unlike he ever had.  We could hear vocalizations from him that we had never heard before.  

The owlet was successfully put back in his tree with his siblings.  He was “branching” before he we released him.  His parents will continue to feed their youngsters until they are independent.

The Great Gray Owl is an endangered species, with only 200 – 300 in California.  It is vital that we restore wildlife habitats.  If a bird doesn’t have a place to live, what’s the sense in saving him?

 :heart  Story Here (http://www.contracostatimes.com/ci_20753128/endangered-owlet-gets-helping-hand-at-lindsay-museum?IADID=Search-www.contracostatimes.com-www.contracostatimes.com)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Rajame on June 02, 2012, 11:54:23 AM
Thank you for the posting Beans. We all can benefit from this information! :hug
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 04, 2012, 11:31:32 AM
 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9vbcDt2rpC4#ws)

A Great Gray Owlet rescued, examined, and returned to his nest tree.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 13, 2012, 10:22:03 AM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/Kitephoto-3.jpg)

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/Kiterenesting.jpg)

Quote
A party in Antioch Saturday night was interrupted when a baby bird was blown from a tree and hit the roof of the house.When party-goers went to investigate, they discovered a whole nest on the ground with two more babies in it. The babies — white tailed kites — were brought to Lindsay Wildlife Museum. The next day, a fourth baby kite was found at the site of the nest tree. Sadly, the bird that hit the roof and this fourth baby did not survive.

That Sunday, a volunteer went to the home in Antioch to assess the situation. She sent photos to Traverso Tree Service, who later appeared on the scene to help with an emergency nest return. Hospital staff brought a wicker basket to the site to serve as a replacement “nest.” It took Traverso Tree Service only 23 minutes to secure the basket to the nest tree with the two surviving babies in it.

Today, vocalizations were heard from the tree so it appears all is well with the two baby kites. Thanks to Luis, Jesus and Miguel of Traverso Tree Service for making it possible for these baby kites to be reunited with their parents!

I'm glad that three of them could be rescued.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on June 13, 2012, 11:23:37 AM
Love, love, love volunteers like Traverso Tree Service!!  Fantastic that a supplimental nest could be fashioned, attached, and accepted.  :biggrin3 :eclove

Jean, reading the article, think only 2 of 4 kite chicks were able to be successfully saved. The two who rode the nest down to the ground. Whew, what a ride that must have been.  2 is a good number tho.  :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 13, 2012, 11:31:49 AM
Someone who works at the museum thought there were three rescued....  :puzzled2
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on June 13, 2012, 11:38:42 AM
The article says a fourth was found the next day, but didn't survive. Maybe it was brought to Lindsay in an attempt to save it?  Or maybe the article is in error?
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 13, 2012, 11:43:07 AM
I don't think so.  The person I spoke to may have been mistaken about the final count or I misunderstand.  But at least we know two are back in the tree, and that's the good news.  The parents can do a much better job than we can.  :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on June 13, 2012, 12:00:55 PM
Isn't it great that the parents were still willing to accept the man made adaptations  :biggrin3

Can you imagine them watching the crane bring that basket to the nest? Were the chicks calling, were the parents calling.... Oh what a happy reunion.  :eclove :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 13, 2012, 02:18:34 PM
The hospital received 229 animals last week, bringing the total to 2573 for this year.

Fledgling birds of many species are out of the nest now, but do not fly well yet. They spend time on the ground hopping to low branches as they strengthen their wings and improve their flight techniques. These fledglings are vulnerable to predation by house cats. It is vital that cats are kept indoors during this season to give these birds a chance to grow up
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 19, 2012, 07:23:07 PM
Tomorrow morning I pick up a Cedar Waxwing from Lindsay Museum hospital and drive him up to Medford for release.  He came to the hospital with a broken wing.  It took him a while to pass his flying test, and he has been flying for at least two weeks.  We can't release him where we found him because all of his family and friends have flown North.  

Checking with Wildlife Images Rehab in Grants Pass, I learned that there are several places in Southern Oregon where these waxwings are currently nesting.  

A special traveling carrier has been prepared.  It has a little window, so the bird won't be in the dark for the trip, although his carrier will be covered with a pillowcase.  And a special natural sisal perch inside.  The weather forecast for Medford on Wednesday is 91 F.  I'll be releasing him around 5 PM, which will give him time to find food, water, and a place to sleep before dusk.  The release site is Touvelle State Park.  

http://www.oregonstateparks.org/park_106.php (http://www.oregonstateparks.org/park_106.php)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on June 19, 2012, 07:39:41 PM
Jean, you say his family have flown North. Can we dream that he'll find his very own family in Medford?  :nod2

Thank you for taking this several hours long drive for this special little waxwing.  :biggrin3
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Rajame on June 19, 2012, 08:05:14 PM
Perhaps he will find Lithia Park in Asland and live there. Wonderful place! Thank you Beans. You certainly amaze me! :hug
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 20, 2012, 10:04:32 PM
At 4:35 PM today the CEDW was released at beautiful TouVelle State Park, just outside of Medford, Oregon.  It was a gentle release, but I think he was just as relieved to get out of his carrier as I was to get out of the car after 6.5 hours of driving.

When we drove into the Park, I thought I heard a CEDW high up, to my left (thank you, iBird).  I found a nice shady spot, under a large tree and carefully opened the carrier.  He flew up, and away, to my left, to a different tree.  Unfortunately, I was unable to get a picture of him!

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Medford%20Oregon/TouVelle140-1.jpg)
He landed in this tree

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Medford%20Oregon/TouVelle141.jpg)
This is the river that runs through the Park

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Medford%20Oregon/TouVelle144-1.jpg)
Beautiful, old trees

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Medford%20Oregon/TouVelle143-1.jpg)
Many trees for perching and nesting

Tomorrow:  a picture of his carrier with its own "picture window"!
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Rajame on June 20, 2012, 10:18:16 PM
Wonderful Beans! Thank you for all you do. I am in awe! :hug
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on June 20, 2012, 11:16:04 PM
Nice berries somewhere near for the little one?  Thank you sooo much for the love and kindness you continuously give. :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: passerine on June 21, 2012, 02:59:08 PM
Such selfless dedication beans, 6.5 hours. Very kind & giving of you, we know Waxwing is grateful.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 22, 2012, 11:16:55 AM
I'm on my iPhone and haven't been able to post the photo of the carrier. May try again later.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on June 23, 2012, 08:18:07 PM
Here's the carrier for our CEDW.  I took the picture after I released him.  Note the little "picture window" that lets in light.  Just needed to be covered with a white pillowcase.  

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/CEDWcarrier.jpg)

There's a natural sisal perch (you can see the knot on the outside of the carrier).  Attached a half orange to the perch.  Also, food in his plate.  He didn't eat very much, if anything.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: gzebear on July 09, 2012, 03:09:04 AM
Jean, what a lovely park for the waxwing release! And I like the 'picture window' in the carrier - so thoughtful. Thank you for making that long drive so that he would be able to find others of his kind, which I trust that he has by now. Last winter, our rehab center had an ash-throated flycatcher who missed migration because of his injury. When he was well and flying again, rather than keep him all winter, we put him on a plane to Texas where he was received and successfully released by another rehabber there. The things we do to give these sweet birds another chance! Thank you!
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 09, 2012, 09:01:27 AM
Gzebear, I can tell that we are kindred spirits :)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: gzebear on July 09, 2012, 01:31:33 PM
 :nod2
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 10, 2012, 04:03:40 PM
The hospital received 173 animals last week, bringing the total to 3424 for this year.

Many of our backyard songbirds have already nested and raised young, but it's still early in the summer season. Many birds will renest, sometimes more than once. Because we'll have fledgling birds just out of the nest and on the ground for much of the summer, it's still important to keep cats indoors.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: emc on July 10, 2012, 05:00:57 PM
173 in one week!  :eceek. That is a huge amount !
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 12, 2012, 11:30:47 PM
Very busy at the hospital!  We have three new Raven fledglings, and I was asked to clean up and hand feed them on my shift.  One of the three doesn't need hand feeding now.  The second one is self-feeding but likes a little hand-feeding.  The third loves to be hand fed, but he's also interested in the big dish of food, so soon he won't need help.  All three are glossy black and beautiful, with their pink mouths.  The inside of their beaks will turn black as they grow up.  We will probably transfer them to another rehab center which has a very large aviary with other Ravens.  But for now --  I'll enjoy them.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: Rajame on July 16, 2012, 08:51:40 PM
 :eclove
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 17, 2012, 12:21:46 PM
This morning I found this tiny hatchling on the ground, a few blocks from my house.  I immediately picked him up, just in case he was still alive.  But he wasn't.  I don't know whether he died from the fall or the cold.  It has been in the low 50s at night here and around 60 during the day.   :ecsad

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Other%20birds/HatchlingJul172012.jpg)

His tiny crop is empty.  I'm guessing he was hatched yesterday or this morning.  There were no feathers around, no nest on the ground.  He was at least ten feet from the closest tree.  Bless his heart, I will give him a proper burial in my yard.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: beans on July 17, 2012, 07:44:20 PM
I sent the pic to one of the rehabbers at Lindsay, and she says he is probably a House Sparrow.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Post by: gzebear on July 18, 2012, 04:24:27 AM
awww beans, poor little baby. They don't last long without mama's warmth, but it may have been the fall that killed him. We rescued a tiny tiny phoebe a few days ago, the size of a marble - he's still alive, not totally okay but holding his little head up now and just started begging. He's at least three days old now and still so itty bitty - no bigger than the one you found. I learned that what happens sometimes is that something happens to the father and another male will take over the nest, throw out the babies so he can make his own. :ecsad
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on July 19, 2012, 10:38:19 AM
Getting ready to leave for Lindsay.  A few minutes ago, a backyard neighbor came around the block to tell me she had an injured Towhee and could I help?  Well, of course.  Except for the catfood kibble in a small dish (with some water), the basket was perfect.  Towel inside and a place for the bird to hide.  And a net bag around the basket, with a string tie, so he would not escape.  He was calling to another Towhee in a tree, but now he's quiet.  If his injuries can be successfully handled, I will release him in my yard, which has other Towhees and trees.  If it is a broken wing, it will take several weeks to heal.

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Miscellany/Clairesbirdcarrier.jpg)

 
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on July 20, 2012, 01:18:03 PM
Unfortunately, this small Towhee's injuries were more serious and we had to euthanize her.  Five minutes later, another Towhee was brought to us.  This little one was also cat caught and her injuries included a broken leg.  She, too, was euthanized.

Now I have to return the little carrier to my neighbor and give her the bad news about the Towhee she gave me.  When she gave her to me, the youngster was calling to a Towhee in a tree.  A parent?  She called and called, with the other bird calling back. 

I do wish people would keep their cats indoors during nesting season.  :ecsad
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: gzebear on July 22, 2012, 06:21:53 AM
So sorry Beans ... cats, grrrrr.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on July 31, 2012, 09:00:26 PM
The hospital received 201 animals last week, bringing the total for this year to 4033.

As summer heats up, west Nile virus is beginning to be detected across the country. It is spread by mosquitoes and affects wildlife (birds and squirrels mostly in our area) and humans. It is very important that you make sure you don't have standing water on your property. Mosquitoes don't need much water to complete their life cycle, so check plant saucers or other containers that might hold water.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on August 24, 2012, 03:35:19 PM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Other%20owls/Snapshot18-24-20121-01PM.png)

Three Crows Released (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYevf5PBOkE#ws)

Three American Crows from Lindsay Wildlife Hospital passed their exit exams and were released on August 23.  Because they are juveniles, it is important that they be released near an established group of Crows, where they will be accepted and taught how to survive.  Nine more juveniles remain in the hospital, but they are not quite ready.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology:  

American Crows are familiar over much of the continent: large, intelligent, all-black birds with hoarse, cawing voices. They are common sights in treetops, fields, and roadsides, and in habitats ranging from open woods and empty beaches to town centers. They usually feed on the ground and eat almost anything -- typically earthworms, insects and other small animals, seeds, and fruit but also garbage, carrion, and chicks they rob from nests. Their flight style is unique, a patient, methodical flapping that is rarely broken up with glides.

American Crow
Corvus brachyrhynchos
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on September 07, 2012, 10:46:47 AM
I am posting this video in the hope that you will share it with friends.  This week another mangled bird was admitted to Lindsay Wildlife hospital in Walnut Creek, California.  He was hit by a wind turbine at the Altamont Pass.

Bird vs Wind Turbine (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NAAzBArYdw#ws)

Wind farms need more regulation.  While they provide alternative sources of energy, they are killing birds, most of which are federally protected migratory birds (not just in the US, but in other countries as well).  One of the worst offenders is the wind farm in the Altamont Pass in California.  The turbines are located in a flyway where thousands of birds migrate each year.  An environmental impact report was not filed before this wind farm was established. 

Bird Mortality in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California reports the number of birds killed, by species: 

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2193/2007-032/abstract (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2193/2007-032/abstract)

If we all send letters or email to our representatives (maybe with a link to this video), perhaps changes will be made. 
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: emc on September 08, 2012, 12:58:13 PM
Yikes! Seeing it is believing. To tell you the truth, I didn't believe it before. Why don't the birds go around? Do you have this so we can put it on our facebooks? I didn't see how to do it on the video except for emailing, favorites, etc.

Thanks for bringing the facts here.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on September 08, 2012, 04:42:55 PM
I think you can copy and paste the link onto your FB timeline.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: emc on September 08, 2012, 05:11:57 PM
Hmmmmm, I'll try, thanks
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on September 08, 2012, 09:27:37 PM
This video is from 2007 are talks specifically about the wind farm at the Altamont Pass in Livermore, California.  This WF should not have been built with an EIR (Environmental Impact Report).  Had one been filed, the WF permit would probably have been denied as this area is a flyway for migratory birds.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on September 10, 2012, 05:10:07 PM
Vulture accident (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RcTjdY1aN4#)

As you can see, the bird does not realize the turbine is dangerous. Watch until the end of the video --  he is rescued, but I don't know how serious his injury is.  Perhaps yet another bird who has to be euthanized after his meeting with a wind turbine.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on September 17, 2012, 10:47:39 AM
Another reason NOT to use rat poison!

Gray Fox Release (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVjG_gQL6Zo#ws)

A female gray fox was brought to the wildlife hospital in mid-August. She was bleeding from her mouth and passing blood in her stool. After an initial exam, we determined the fox was suffering from rodenticide poisoning. Fortunately the fox came to us just in time and we were able to start treatments that reversed the effects of the poison. By early September, she had improved, her blood values were normal and she was acting more like a healthy fox.

Last weekend the wildlife hospital released the gray fox back to the wild and shared that experience with seven lucky members of the public. If you would like to be invited to a release of a wildlife hospital patient, visit our website (http://wildlife-museum.org/hospital/releases (http://wildlife-museum.org/hospital/releases)) and register your email address to be notified.

I saw this little fox in the holding room.  I am so glad she has recovered and is back in the wild. I don't know why people are still using rat poison. If you want to get rid of rats, use snap traps in your own house. Never use poison. This puts many animals at risk, including pets. Outside, Red-tailed Hawks and Barn Owls are the answer.

When rats and mice eat d-CON, a potent anticoagulant poison, they don't die right away. Deterioration in the blood's ability to clot takes up to a week to become fatal, during which time the animal grows increasingly dazed and sluggish and therefore more vulnerable to predators. The poison can then build up in the bodies of these larger animals, sometimes leading to their own demise as their blood vessels, too, essentially explode. This was found to be the fate of three beloved red-tailed hawks in Manhattan earlier this year.

Read about the hawks here:  http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/81470.html (http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/81470.html)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: emc on September 17, 2012, 11:45:18 AM
So glad to see another rescue. Sad that it was needed in the first place. We need to be smarter about what we are doing that can affect wildlife.   Thank you for the education.

 :heart
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: mishikeenhquay on September 17, 2012, 04:20:19 PM


Miigwetch for the posts Beans....It is such a sad thing the way that humans feel so superior to all of our brothers and sisters.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: gzebear on September 21, 2012, 01:56:25 PM

It is sooo sad, not only for foxes, owls, hawks, but for the mice and rats themselves. It is a horribly painful and senseless way to die. AJL's words which I have repeated innumerable times: Poison anything and you poison everything.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on September 27, 2012, 12:13:44 PM
(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/crows/CrowsonaWire.jpg)

Crows on a Wire (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pRsqlKRBXg#ws)

We've always had crows in our yard.  They come around when we put out the peanuts, sunflower seeds, and pumpkin seeds for the squirrels.  I saw two juvenile crows (they have pink mouths).  These may be two of the three I brought home from the wildlife hospital and released into my yard a few weeks ago.

Music by Kevin MacLeod:  Sneaky
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: Cawatcher on September 27, 2012, 12:41:40 PM
 :eclol thank you beans!!  I hope it was your 3 hanging around!
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on January 02, 2013, 06:13:51 PM
The hospital received 45 animals last week. The total number of animals for 2012 was 5565 (244 more than 2011).

Thinking about making New Year's resolutions? Think about helping wildlife in your backyard in the coming year. Keep cats indoors. Don't use sticky traps or rodent baits. If you use bird netting, make sure it is secure and off the ground. Use pesticides sparingly or not at all. Keep your bird feeders clean. Help the wildlife hospitals by reducing the number of injured and sick wild animals that need care.

(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g38/jeaniesa_2006/Lindsay%20Wildlife%20Museum/VirginiaOpossums.jpg)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on February 25, 2013, 10:50:37 AM
Lindsay uploaded Core 3 Curriculum to YouTube, which compares Mammals and Birds.  This video is an excellent opportunity to see what Lindsay teaches its volunteers!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2_3dnVcGAk

I suggest you watch on YouTube at 480 pixels, large window (or full screen)
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: jeavverhey on February 28, 2013, 01:57:31 AM
Wow Beans  :eceek - that is awesome.  Bookmarked   :thumbup: thank you.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: beans on July 18, 2014, 09:31:52 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdG4unU6nkI

Each evening a mated pair of Mourning Doves enjoys a meal at my bird feeder. 

July 16 I rescued one of them in  my yard.  She had probably been caught by a cat.  I took her to Lindsay Wildlife Hospital.  One of the techs I know checked her in for me.  That evening she called me:   The dove did not make it. The bird had been scalped.  Our vet did some suturing and things looked okay until they took rads.  The skull was fractured and brain was protruding.  She was humanely euthanized.

Her mate returns each evening.  He walks around the grass and then flies up to the platform feeder.  He doesn't eat much.  And then he flies off.

Please keep your cats indoors.  Thank you.
Title: Re: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)
Post by: birdvoyer on July 19, 2014, 07:10:58 AM
What a sad reminder.  I have 4 pair that visit my feeders that I love watching and listening to in the mornings.

When I was young, in he late fifties, we had a Siamese that we would let outside when she "asked".  One day she returned and laid crying on our porch while we were in school.  Mom found her with her shoulder destroyed.  The vet did an amazing job of saving her.  He suspects someone shot her (it was squirrel season) and we never let her out again...not any of our future cats either.

This poor dove's loss is just another reason to add to the list of why to keep cats indoors...for everyone's safety!